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View Full Version : BA777 loses door 2L at Cape Town


Compton3fox
26th Jan 2022, 20:42
https://onemileatatime.com/news/british-airways-777-door-ripped-off/

https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/pprune.org-vbulletin/781x1048/screenshot_20220126_215208_twitter_dfe6866336bf610b359bee755 0e61523ae256415.jpg
https://cimg7.ibsrv.net/gimg/pprune.org-vbulletin/1080x1707/screenshot_20220126_215141_twitter_0a50c827d78a3651ce31ce5e5 a8cda45ae36a015.jpg
Image via @airline_kitty Twitter


Thread title amended from CPT to Cape Town

Senior Pilot

nivsy
27th Jan 2022, 05:34
Gosh why should this ever happen? Surely someone would.bw aware prior to push back? Even noticed! . Sounds like total incompetence.

Locked door
27th Jan 2022, 06:12
I very much doubt this happened in push back. Itís almost certainly a malfunction or error handling the air bridge.

wiggy
27th Jan 2022, 06:14
Gosh why should this ever happen? Surely someone would.bw aware prior to push back? Even noticed! . Sounds like total incompetence.

Could be but I think we need to know exactly what moved, when and why before coming to any judgement.

HOVIS
27th Jan 2022, 06:15
I very much doubt this happened in push back. Itís almost certainly a malfunction or error handling the air bridge.
Self levelling mechanism failure perhaps.

Locked door
27th Jan 2022, 06:18
Itís worth noting no BA staff would have been involved. After the plane is emptied of people (inc flight and cabin crew) it is moved to a remote stand for the day and then brought back in time for the evening return flight. Only local ground crew would have been involved.

the_stranger
27th Jan 2022, 08:53
Gosh why should this ever happen? Surely someone would.bw aware prior to push back? Even noticed! . Sounds like total incompetence.
I think someone thought: surely someone has checked it and nobody did.

From a pushback truck you can't see that bridge/door, you can't really see it from the cockpit. Someone screwed up for sure, but it is easier than you think.

Union Jack
27th Jan 2022, 09:08
I very much doubt this happened in push back. Itís almost certainly a malfunction or error handling the air bridge.
"Doors to manual, sorry - manhandle"!:ugh:

Jack

wiggy
27th Jan 2022, 09:30
I think someone thought: surely someone has checked it and nobody did.

From a pushback truck you can't see that bridge/door, you can't really see it from the cockpit..

Unless you are going to wind open the side window(s) and lean out :ooh: you canít see the door at all from the Flight deck, but you would have an EICAS message if it was open and can also check the dedicated Doors page on the EICAS displayÖ

In any event for all we know (well allI know) so far this may not have been caused by an attempt at pushing back with the door still open, as has been mentioned upthread other options are possibilitiesÖ.

andrasz
27th Jan 2022, 09:38
The damage is consistent with the floor of the jetbridge pushing the door upwards, there are shear bolts in the door to hinge attachment just for this eventuality to prevent even greater damage at the hinge to fuselage attachment . There are three ways this could have happened:

Heavy cargo was offloaded from the rear compartment, causing the nose to settle, with the door pressing on the jetbridge. Normally this should be avoided by a sensor shoe placed under the door which moves the jetbridge down, but if it was forgotten or incorrectly placed, this is the result (been there, seen that, though luckily it was not me who did it)
During bridge positioning, the operator moved the joystick the wrong way, moving the bridge up (rather likely).
During bridge positioning, due to some malfunction the bridge moved upwards unexpectedly (very unlikely).

The solid roof of the jetbridge does not extend to the door top due to the curvature of the fuselage, and the extendable rain cover would not do such damage. Pushback would put sideways load on the door, and the solid sides of jetbridges at CPT do not extend that far, it would be the flexible rain cover catching the side and ripping before the door fails.

deltahotel
27th Jan 2022, 12:01
Phew. When I first read the title I thought it said door lost at Compton VOR.

FullWings
27th Jan 2022, 12:31
Rumour has it that it was being towed off the stand with no crew or passengers, but the tow team at Capetown (CPT, FACT) didn’t notice that the jetty was still attached and it didn’t want to let go of the door...

meleagertoo
27th Jan 2022, 12:45
I too thought there had been a door lost in the London TMA, as, I expect, the great majority of the readership did.
I still have no idea where it actually occurred though.,

FUMR
27th Jan 2022, 13:00
I too thought there had been a door lost in the London TMA, as, I expect, the great majority of the readership did.
I still have no idea where it actually occurred though.,

I really don't understand what all the fuss is. CPT is the official IATA code for Cape Town International Airport.

chinaman1119
27th Jan 2022, 13:48
I think someone thought: surely someone has checked it and nobody did.

From a pushback truck you can't see that bridge/door, you can't really see it from the cockpit. Someone screwed up for sure, but it is easier than you think.

All the ramps of the major airports (that I have seen and worked on) have the "parking spot" of each airbridge wheel assy painted on the tarmac. For certain because it is intended to be parked there (obviously for safe aircraft movement onto and off the stand). Can't vouch, if and where it may be part of pushback SOPs for the tug driver to visually cornfirm before starting to push.

Magplug
27th Jan 2022, 14:37
The two BA morning arrivals into Cape Town remain on the ground all day before departing in the evening. After disembarkation they are moved to remote stands. The groundcrew commenced pushback to remote without noticing that the airbridge was still attached to the aircraft (How you might ask?)

TIA - This is Africa

DaveReidUK
27th Jan 2022, 16:06
I really don't understand what all the fuss is. CPT is the official IATA code for Cape Town International Airport.

IATA codes are not much used in Row 0.

Perhaps the confusion arose from the identity of the OP. :O

wiggy
27th Jan 2022, 16:57
IATA codes are not much used in Row 0.

When in actually in row 0 yep, but rosters, allowance statements, etc certainly used to be in IATA so you had to be bilingual :8

(Stands by for the old chestnut about people bidding for a Christmas trip to LOS……)…

Perhaps the confusion arose from the identity of the OP. :O


You might be onto something with that….

BYveterangirl
27th Jan 2022, 17:35
IATA codes are not much used in Row 0.

Perhaps the confusion arose from the identity of the OP. :O

You must be one of the most prolific posters on PPRuNe Dave. (Sometimes I wonder if you're ever off your keyboard). Your posts are often valid. However, on this occasion you're hopelessly wrong. My rosters throughout my flying career used IATA codes.

DaveReidUK
27th Jan 2022, 21:01
You must be one of the most prolific posters on PPRuNe Dave. (Sometimes I wonder if you're ever off your keyboard). Your posts are often valid. However, on this occasion you're hopelessly wrong. My rosters throughout my flying career used IATA codes.

Fair enough. Come to think of it, I've probably read thousands of tech logs in my time, all showing the sector as IATA codes. I stand corrected. :\

Tom Sawyer
28th Jan 2022, 01:57
Gosh why should this ever happen? Surely someone would.bw aware prior to push back? Even noticed! . Sounds like total incompetence.

Incompetence - maybe? But expect to see and hear a lot more of these kind of events. It has been widely reported in various outlets about pilots losing their skills over the past 18-24 months, well the same goes for those of us on the ground. What was a natural process a couple of years ago, now takes a bit more time and thought. I'm getting back onto A380s in the next few weeks as a Licensed Engineer and expect I'll need a few days, maybe weeks to get back into the groove of where things are, quick resets, processes etc....just hope I don't end up being part of a similar event! Maybe not so quick with the judgement.

Speed_Alive_V1
29th Jan 2022, 18:32
This airframe just got airbourne again from Cape Town - presumably all doors now attached


https://cimg7.ibsrv.net/gimg/pprune.org-vbulletin/644x475/screen_shot_2022_01_29_at_19_20_06_361c83b02e28c74e244b6de0c 290da57c5fda8a7.png

DaveReidUK
29th Jan 2022, 19:43
Non-revenue flight, needless to say.

dixi188
30th Jan 2022, 12:17
It looks like the damage is to the door hinge mechanism only so manually placing the door in the closed position and locking it should be safe for a ferry flight.

procede
31st Jan 2022, 07:20
It looks like the damage is to the door hinge mechanism only so manually placing the door in the closed position and locking it should be safe for a ferry flight.

My thoughts as well. As long as the locking pins are in place the door will stay put. They would just have to use another door. The main constraint would be that the slide attached with this door would be unusable as it would disappear together with the door if you would open it.

hoistop
31st Jan 2022, 08:52
Not that unusual. Had to deal with door damage myself too on A-320 in my previous life. Jet bridge protection malfunctioned, some reckless operation of the bridge and..... door was bent quite badly.

DaveReidUK
31st Jan 2022, 09:59
The B772 in question arrived at Heathrow just after 0700 yesterday.

It was back in revenue service less than five hours later.