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ILS27LEFT
23rd Nov 2020, 13:59
BREAKING A British Airways Boeing 747 caught fire at Castellon Airport, Spain

Somebody forgot a mobile on charge?

lomapaseo
23rd Nov 2020, 15:27
Do they fly the route with a B747 or is it a diversion?

dns
23rd Nov 2020, 15:36
Being stored, all the BA jumbos have been retired

BRISTOLRE
23rd Nov 2020, 15:44
Its CIVD
looks like a fire in cockpit roof above cockpit windows
these two havent been broken yet, engines still on them
videos and clips are around on the net

gas path
23rd Nov 2020, 16:10
Allegedly someone hacked into an oxygen pipe!

Nil by mouth
23rd Nov 2020, 16:19
Here's a video link

https://twitter.com/i/status/1330881634355310601

TURIN
23rd Nov 2020, 16:47
I wonder what was the source of ignition. Someone having a crafty fag while they work or was there any grease around?

Sad sight though. An iconic image for 2020.

ATC Watcher
23rd Nov 2020, 18:06
Reminds me of a similar incident on a brand new A340 in Paris during maintenance in the early 1990's . Someone pulled out some boxes caused an electrical short circuit, resulting in a fire, the guy was alone , by the time time he ran out to get help and a fire extinguisher, the fire was too large to be put out. the aircraft was completely destroyed in the end if I remember. Shit happens .
On another matter , the dense back smoke and the duration of the fire show how retardant the materials around the cockpit are in reality :rolleyes:

LessThanSte
23rd Nov 2020, 18:17
On another matter , the dense back smoke and the duration of the fire show how retardant the materials around the cockpit are in reality :rolleyes:
I thought so too - are they really that flammable? That looks like a fairly intense fire (or smoky, anyway!), and something that would cause absolute havoc in the air. Or would an onboard fire extinguisher put that out in no time in flight?

Hueymeister
23rd Nov 2020, 18:30
Apparently the reg is G-CVID....sounds too good to be true....!

dns
23rd Nov 2020, 18:33
The BCF extinguishers onboard are VERY effective, using more than one on any onboard fire is very rare.

In a flight situation I doubt this sort of thing would have got beyond the smell of burning and a bit of smoke. The pilots would have got straight on to the oxygen masks and PA'd the cabin crew to get in their immediately to run through their drills.

tdracer
23rd Nov 2020, 18:38
On another matter , the dense back smoke and the duration of the fire show how retardant the materials around the cockpit are in reality :rolleyes:

If - as gas path posted - it's being fed by an O2 pipe, just about anything will burn...

dns
23rd Nov 2020, 18:41
Interesting... I'd have thought it would have made sense to drain the oxygen systems for storage, but maybe there's a reason not to

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wub
23rd Nov 2020, 18:43
Apparently the reg is G-CVID....sounds too good to be true....!
The reg is G-CIVD

atakacs
23rd Nov 2020, 18:46
Are those in storage or being dismantled?

Nil by mouth
23rd Nov 2020, 18:51
Quoting from the same source of that video I posted:-

An unused two-story, fifteen-metre-high Boeing 747 aircraft had been parked at the airport on the Mediterranean coast of Spain waiting to be scrapped when the fire broke out.

dns
23rd Nov 2020, 18:53
It's being scrapped, apparently the process hasn't started yet

TitanCadetScheme
23rd Nov 2020, 19:03
It has now.

DuncanDoenitz
23rd Nov 2020, 19:41
https://www.pprune.org/spectators-balcony-spotters-corner/636988-bid-bit-ba-surplus-stock.html

I think we can scratch Lot 169.

TURIN
23rd Nov 2020, 20:21
Makes You wonder who is doing the dismantling and for how much.

ivor toolbox
23rd Nov 2020, 21:18
TURIN

E Cube has been mentioned elsewhere.

OvertHawk
23rd Nov 2020, 21:46
However.

in hindsight i admit that referring to something which people have cared for for a long time as "some hulk" was insensitive. for that I apologise. I myself have seen airframes that i've flown and cared for end up in similar circumstances and it is not easy.

But my point remains the same - I don't want people putting themselves in harms way to protect something that is going to be turned into scrap anyway.

DaveReidUK
23rd Nov 2020, 22:17
Having watched, along with my colleagues, aircraft which one has worked on, or flown, only a few weeks/months/years previously now being torn apart with the help of a JCB, I can vouch for the fact that it's a valuable lesson in Airline Economics 101. :O

old,not bold
24th Nov 2020, 09:13
It's quite reminiscent of the DHL fire at San Francisco in 2008. (https://www.skybrary.aero/index.php/B762,_San_Francisco_CA_USA,_2008)

Here's an extract;

"the initiation of the fire could be traced to internal ignition of a pvc oxygen supply hose in the crew compartment."

SID PLATE
24th Nov 2020, 14:07
I wonder what was the source of ignition. Someone having a crafty fag while they work or was there any grease around?

Sad sight though. An iconic image for 2020.

Crafty fag ?
There's a smoke removal vent on the top of the forward fuselage, operated by a T handle on the overhead panel. When BA got round to banning smoking on the flight deck, transgressions were occasionally reported to management by the cabin crew, which could result in a formal carpeting and a loss of seniority for the transgressor. Die hard tab hounds used to crack the smoke vent in flight, and wedge the T handle with a ten pence piece, so that any cigarette smoke on the flight deck went out of the vent, and didn't filter back to the forward galley.
In the olden days, a few Flight Engineers smoked pipes or cigars on the 747 100's and 200's. If you turned round in your seat to speak to them, you couldn't see them, but you knew they were there.

dns
24th Nov 2020, 15:02
Did the -400 have that vent? I thought it was just the classics...

Heard a great story once about a flight engineer who got fed up with the dust and crumbs being left on the consoles. He bought a length of plastic tube and would attach it to the smoke vent so he could use it as a hoover!

eckhard
24th Nov 2020, 15:29
Did the -400 have that vent? I thought it was just the classics...

My understanding is that it was originally the tube for mounting the sextant on the early models and it was “repurposed” as a smoke vent.

Die hard tab hounds used to crack the smoke vent in flight, and wedge the T handle with a ten pence piece, so that any cigarette smoke on the flight deck went out of the vent, and didn't filter back to the forward galley.

I remember a particular Captain on a Gatwick-Houston trip in 1998 doing almost exactly that! The only difference was that he used a 1 coin. Typical BA Captain; I’m surprised he didn’t use a 50 note to light up........

Shackman
24th Nov 2020, 15:31
Heard a great story once about a flight engineer who got fed up with the dust and crumbs being left on the consoles. He bought a length of plastic tube and would attach it to the smoke vent so he could use it as a hoover!
That's so old - we used all sorts of holes in the (unpressurised) Shack to hoover up rubbish, as taught to FE's and others from their predecessors on aircraft going back to before WWII.

TheWestCoast
24th Nov 2020, 17:57
Isn't the practice of painting over airline livery on retired planes done to prevent this kind of negative imagery getting into the public domain - in this case, smoke belching from a cockpit next to BA logos?

DaveReidUK
24th Nov 2020, 19:07
Isn't the practice of painting over airline livery on retired planes done to prevent this kind of negative imagery getting into the public domain - in this case, smoke belching from a cockpit next to BA logos?

It's a long time since BA worried about such niceties.

https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/pprune.org-vbulletin/1600x1078/british_airways_boeing_737_derelict_at_addis_ababa_29b554a48 f6ba5f0800e435df2075dd639f5d61d.jpg

dixi188
24th Nov 2020, 20:38
Mid '70s a BA One-Eleven landed at Hurn without the nose gear extended. Soon after everyone was off a BA van appeared and a man painted out the name, filmed by local TV crew. Then a crane came along to lift the nose and remove the aircraft from the runway.

MAC 40612
24th Nov 2020, 23:02
Castellon as a location is relatively new to the aircraft scrapping business, one of a number of newer locations that have appeared in recent times to deal with the upsurge of withdrawn airliners. BA had only just started using that location, with in the past BA using Victorville [USA] Kemble and Newquay [England] St Athan [Wales] and Teruel [Spain]

The oxygen system should [hopefully] have been turned off at the bottles but maybe someone missed the two crew bottles that are in a different location to all the passenger bottles or forgot to depressurise the crew system?

Pilot DAR
24th Nov 2020, 23:16
A bit of thread drift, but should I ask why a British Airways 737 has a "5Y" registration?

TWT
24th Nov 2020, 23:41
BA franchise in Kenya with Regional Air

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regional_Air_(Kenya)

Similar deal in South Africa (Comair)

student88
25th Nov 2020, 13:07
TheWestCoast

Until recently, eCube at St Athan were painting out the BA livery on the 747s. The same company are also doing the dismantling at this location in Spain and were harvesting G-CIVD at the time of the incident.

Lew747
26th Nov 2020, 06:46
More footage including the interior...
https://youtu.be/EFjRSpPo90I

procede
26th Nov 2020, 11:28
I'm surprised the engines are still under the wing.

MAC 40612
26th Nov 2020, 13:11
Why are you surprised about the engines? All the BA 747s had quite high hours engines and there isn't a massive market for RB211s, in fact most of the BA RB211s being sold are not even going to the aviation industry.

procede
26th Nov 2020, 13:44
I would think there are still quite a few spare parts and valuable materials for recycling in them and they are fairly easy to take apart.

Check Airman
26th Nov 2020, 18:46
MAC 40612

Where are they going?

MAC 40612
26th Nov 2020, 19:50
Oil/Gas industry, they strip the engines down to the core and are used as pumps/compressors run for a couple of years and then disposed of. Allegedly, the cost of buying up one of these is cheaper than having their existing units serviced

Check Airman
27th Nov 2020, 04:12
Wow. I had no idea. Thanks.

India Four Two
27th Nov 2020, 06:47
Gas turbines have been used in compressor stations for many years.

Avons replaced by RB211s:
https://www.rolls-royce.com/media/press-releases-archive/yr-2007/rr-rb211-gas.aspx


https://cimg9.ibsrv.net/gimg/pprune.org-vbulletin/455x487/screen_shot_2020_11_26_at_23_45_29_62654dc9e117bfde19dc53776 6cdfbf2608a39e5.png