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Shaman
24th Jan 2020, 20:04
On the 31st March 1992, a B707 lost two engines (literally) near the top of climb over France.

The a/c was 5N-MAS. The Captain was Swedish, the FO and FE were British.

The FO had the presence of mind to take a photograph of the wing with the two missing engines. Anyone able to post a copy of it?

Does anyone know the crew involved and what they went on to do after this?

The accident report can be found here (https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&ved=2ahUKEwiE-rKViJjnAhWOYMAKHVVTCYEQFjAAegQIARAB&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.bea.aero%2Fuploads%2Ftx_elydbrapports% 2F5N-MAS-EN.pdf&usg=AOvVaw2BlzBJoniJ-7r6yyQ5ukS4)

treadigraph
24th Jan 2020, 20:19
First Officer was Martin Emery.

Herod
24th Jan 2020, 20:49
The stuff of nightmares. IMC to boot. Brilliantly handled by all the crew. I hope someone has a picture.

The Banjo
24th Jan 2020, 21:31
https://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19920331-0

capngrog
24th Jan 2020, 21:40
I was able to find this link to an overhead photograph of the aircraft (after it landed) and the CVR transcript. There's not much left of the right wing.

The link:

https://www.tailstrike.com/310392.htm

Cheers,
Grog

capngrog
24th Jan 2020, 21:56
Here's a link to the entire accident report in French. If you scroll down to near the bottom, you'll see a series of 21 photographs of the aircraft, details of the fire damage and closeup photos of classic metal fatigue in engine pylon attachment points. The crew and passengers of 5N-MAS were both VERY lucky and VERY skilled. Although I realize that much, if not most, of the fire damage shown on the right wing was post-landing, I don't think that wing would have been able to produce enough lift to prevent a loss of control for much longer. There are also pronounced scorch marks on the right(starboard) aft fuselage and the right(starboard) horizontal stabilizer tip.

The link:

https://www.bea.aero/docspa/1992/5n-s920331/htm/5n-s920331.html

Cheers,
Grog

Flexable
24th Jan 2020, 22:32
Quite a story, thanks for sharing.

tdracer
24th Jan 2020, 22:37
There was a 'single engine' 707 during a Boeing Flight Test back in 1959. Doing severe Dutch Roll maneuvers they managed to rip off three of the four engines. With only one engine, they couldn't make an airport and did a crash landing along the Stillaguamish River near Oso, Washington (~50 miles north of Seattle). Four fatalities (all on the flight deck), four survivors who moved to the tail in preparation for the crash landing.

https://www.historylink.org/File/20411

megan
25th Jan 2020, 02:25
Aircraft was over 30 years old with 60,000 hours, ex PanAm, Iran Air, Uganda Airways, Dan Air, converted to freighter and passed through a number of hands on North Atlantic freight runs. Finally with Nigerian Trans-Air Limited. At the time carrying 40 tons of mining equipment bound for Esso in Lagos.

Captain Ingemar Bergelund, 25,000 hours, 10 years 707
F/O Martin Emery, 16,000 hours, 50% on multi jet
E/O Terry Boone, over 18,000 hours on the 707

Just the sort of experience you need. Notable that the F/O took a photo of the wing, he didn't expect they were going to survive, with the hope the film would survive the crash and investigators would have evidence of accident cause. Talk about cool under pressure.

rog747
25th Jan 2020, 06:41
Built 1964 as N794PA for Pan Am, she served with them until 1973. Aries Air Cargo & Iran Air leases followed; then in 1977, she went to Uganda Airlines.
she then went onto the UK register with Scimitar Airlines, IAS Cargo and Tradewinds.
Her final stop was to Trans Air Services of Nigeria, as 5N-MAS in February 1992. She was W/O on 31/03/92 flying Frankfurt - Kano. She made an emergency landing in Istres, France when her No. 4 engine separated during flight.

DaveReidUK
25th Jan 2020, 06:45
There was a 'single engine' 707 during a Boeing Flight Test back in 1959. Doing severe Dutch Roll maneuvers they managed to rip off three of the four engines. With only one engine, they couldn't make an airport and did a crash landing along the Stillaguamish River near Oso, Washington (~50 miles north of Seattle). Four fatalities (all on the flight deck), four survivors who moved to the tail in preparation for the crash landing.

https://www.historylink.org/File/20411

Acceptance flight for Braniff.

FlexibleResponse
25th Jan 2020, 07:02
You might get lucky here:

The first officer First he just noticed the loss of the outboard engine. He was in charge of the radio traffic and guided the captain to the intended runway thanks to the headings given by the ATC control and asked the flight engineer for the execution of the "emergency operating procedure" checklist. Finally, when he saw the Istres runway, he asked for information on the nature of the ground and the length of the runway. Conscious that the aircraft had limited manoeuvring, he suggested operating a counter QFU circuit to the left. He advised the captain to keep a minimum 200 kt speed and helped during the landing by holding the left engines power handles. For the completion, he also had time to take a picture, in flight, of the right wing leading edge where engine n4 had disappeared ...(Flight International 4/10 November 1992).

https://www.bea.aero/uploads/tx_elydbrapports/5N-MAS-EN.pdf

Shaman
25th Jan 2020, 10:32
Thank you to everyone who has posted replies. The skill shown by the crew was outstanding and a great example of CRM before I had even heard of CRM!

HolyMoley
25th Jan 2020, 13:09
I remember shortly after it Martin coming into the flying club at Biggin and showing us the photo he’d taken. Interesting chap.

Caboclo
25th Jan 2020, 15:10
]Aircraft was over 30 years old with 60,000 hours,

Hmm, I’m currently flying 50 year old planes with 70,000 hours. :eek:

TCU
25th Jan 2020, 18:10
Didn't know about 5N-MAS. What a splendid outcome.

The loss of an engine and the outer part of the starboard wing of Boeing 707 N761PA, operating Pan Am 843 in June 1965, was rather impressively captured by passengers, Mr & Mrs Richmond

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-fNahas8Ro

Shaman
25th Jan 2020, 19:21
TCU - thanks for the info and link - I did not know about that one at all; and to have a video of the event as well long before the introduction of smartphones etc etc......

tdracer
25th Jan 2020, 23:45
Didn't know about 5N-MAS. What a splendid outcome.

The loss of an engine and the outer part of the starboard wing of Boeing 707 N761PA, operating Pan Am 843 in June 1965, was rather impressively captured by passengers, Mr & Mrs Richmond


I remember seeing the passenger video on the nightly news back when it happened - stunning stuff for a 10 year old kid (that was years before I decided to go into aero engineering for a profession).
There are stills from that video in one of my aviation textbooks.

GreekPilot747
26th Jan 2020, 08:18
Ingemar Berglund was hired by a greek start-up charter airline in Summer 1993. The name was Ikaros Airlines.
I was also hired by this outfit at the time. The airline unfortunately never started operations.
We did the training for the A320 at the same time in Toulouse. Ingemar went through the training for the A320
with success. As the airline never took off, I lost track of him. He showed me pictures and told me the story first hand.
That was one admirable feat to get that airplane on the ground without fatalities. He also had an aerial view of the wreckage,
as they touched down at very high speed and departed the runway into the grass.

DaveReidUK
26th Jan 2020, 10:32
The loss of an engine and the outer part of the starboard wing of Boeing 707 N761PA, operating Pan Am 843 in June 1965, was rather impressively captured by passengers, Mr & Mrs Richmond

CAB Aircraft Accident Report:

olympus
26th Jan 2020, 11:42
Anyone know what became of Martin Emery? I remember he checked me out in a Cherokee that I was hiring from Blackbushe in the early seventies.

Shaman
26th Jan 2020, 11:57
Some additional information about the flight and Martin here (https://mutleyshangar.com/forum/index.php?/topic/13925-one-doesnt-get-closer-to-crashing-than-this-a-true-story/)

tspark
26th Jan 2020, 20:22
The full story was in article/interview by Bob Grimstead with Martin Emery in the October 1994 edition of Pilot magazine !

Harry Wayfarers
29th Jan 2020, 06:46
The full story was in article/interview by Bob Grimstead with Martin Emery in the October 1994 edition of Pilot magazine !

I doubt that it was the full story but Martin Emery's somewhat imaginative version of events, I knew Martin as long ago as 1979 at Laker, I met him again in Ostend in the 90's, he hadn't changed, mmm ... I wonder why he never got a command!

As per a previous PPrRuNe thread of this flight, years ago, a post was made that Martin hadn't stop talking about the story ever since, there were five personnel on board with Martin literally being the radio operator, Martin tells the story to anyone that will listen, he's had his five minutes of fame, the remainder of the crew were telling more truthful accounts and normally over a beer, I heard the account in an Irish bar in Ostend.

Fly.Buy
11th Feb 2020, 06:57
From memory the stranded passengers on Panam flight 843 waited for a replacement fight. It duly arrived but either the nose gear collapsed or the tyres burst on landing within their sight. Some of the passengers decided that they had enough flying for the day and elected to get a coach home!