PDA

View Full Version : This guy used to be CFO at Qantas .. arrested today!!


whatever6719
11th Dec 2018, 07:12
https://amp.smh.com.au/business/companies/businessman-peter-gregg-in-custody-after-being-found-guilty-of-falsifying-records-20181211-p50lkp.html

whatever6719
11th Dec 2018, 07:13
And some background
https://www.smh.com.au/business/qantas-cfo-gregg-resigns-20080819-3y2q.html

gordonfvckingramsay
11th Dec 2018, 07:33
1 down! shame he’ll probably be released from jail with his wealth intact. How about stripping him of the assets he gained while he was committing fraud.

virgindriver
11th Dec 2018, 07:50
It’s probably all in his wife’s name. I’m sure he is probably broke.

Isnt that how it works?

Be great to see some of these criminals brought to justice but this is probably just a token conviction.

tio540
11th Dec 2018, 09:10
How is this possible, with all that pre employment testing?

Rated De
11th Dec 2018, 10:58
How is this possible, with all that pre employment testing?





Like attracts like.
It is by design a neat system

Students of the corporation might note the Pete will know where the bodies are buried.
He was involved in JQ Asia.
He had material interest in several aircraft leasing ventures with his old friend Geoffrey Dixon and the usual cohort.
He simultaneously sat on Leighton Holdings whilst also at Qantas while the two companies 'tendered' for maintenance.
Apparently all it took was to walk out of the room change hats and bazinga, no conflict of interest.

Given a conviction then presumably all other ventures he was associated with ought be scrutinised.

neville_nobody
12th Dec 2018, 00:55
Or he cuts a deal to stay out of gaol and drops some information. I would say that if the regulator was smart they figure out what they want to know then go have a chat. The US justice department still wants people over the freight cartel, so there might be some negotiating to come.

Rated De
13th Dec 2018, 00:28
Or he cuts a deal to stay out of gaol and drops some information. I would say that if the regulator was smart they figure out what they want to know then go have a chat. The US justice department still wants people over the freight cartel, so there might be some negotiating to come.

With the departure of Mr Medcraft, one might hope.
Those with knowledge of Mr Shipton, despite his father's impeccable connections may advise not to hold breath

LeadSled
13th Dec 2018, 01:52
Those with knowledge of Mr Shipton, despite his father's impeccable connections may advise not to hold breath

Oh! Ye of little faith!!??
Tootle pip!!

PS: Read the book "Game of Mates". ISBN: 978-0-6480611-0-6

CurtainTwitcher
13th Dec 2018, 02:35
PS: Read the book "Game of Mates". ISBN: 978-0-6480611-0-6
Haven't read the book, but on my To Read list. Based on the concept in the book: Codes of the Underworld: How Criminals Communicate by Diego Gambetta.

You only need to look at how ASIC protected senior ANZ executives in a recent interest rate manipulation scandal to see how corrupt corporate governance and regulatory oversight is: Documents reveal knowledge of ANZ's rate-rigging program went right to the top (https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-13/anz-management-knew-of-bbsw-rigging/10600590).

In essence, the Australian corporate scene is organised along the lines of the Mafia, you need to have committed a serious crime to become one of "The Club".

From book blurb
How do criminals communicate with each other? Unlike the rest of us, people planning crimes can't freely advertise their goods and services, nor can they rely on formal institutions to settle disputes and certify quality. They face uniquely intense dilemmas as they grapple with the basic problems of whom to trust, how to make themselves trusted, and how to handle information without being detected by rivals or police. In this book, one of the world's leading scholars of the mafia ranges from ancient Rome to the gangs of modern Japan, from the prisons of Western countries to terrorist and pedophile rings, to explain how despite these constraints, many criminals successfully stay in business.


Diego Gambetta shows that as villains balance the lure of criminal reward against the fear of dire punishment, they are inspired to unexpected feats of subtlety and ingenuity in communication. He uncovers the logic of the often bizarre ways in which inveterate and occasional criminals solve their dilemmas, such as why the tattoos and scars etched on a criminal's body function as lines on a professional résumé, why inmates resort to violence to establish their position in the prison pecking order, and why mobsters are partial to nicknames and imitate the behavior they see in mafia movies. Even deliberate self-harm and the disclosure of their crimes are strategically employed by criminals to convey important messages.


By deciphering how criminals signal to each other in a lawless universe, this gruesomely entertaining and incisive book provides a quantum leap in our ability to make sense of their actions.