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nomorecatering
7th Dec 2018, 09:18
Every car magazine, article about cars, the news, current affairs TV, car shows, press launches. All they, and governments talk about is Autonomous Driving. Many pomus TV presenters state that it will reduce the number of cars on the road by 80%. No one will want to own a car they breathlessly claim.

Most countries cannot fill in pot holes or paint lines on the road let alone maintain road infrastructure to the standard required for self driving cars.

I'm actually sick of hearing about them. A car is a status symbol, an extension of your personality. I have no interest in being picked by a self driving, silent egg.

atakacs
7th Dec 2018, 09:23
I'm actually sick of hearing about them. A car is a status symbol, an extension of your personality. I have no interest in being picked by a self driving, silent egg.
I hear you but I'm afraid you are fighting a lost battle.

Self driving is already here (just a matter of cost) and the writing is in the wall. I'd say within a generation human driving will be forbidden.

Cheltman
7th Dec 2018, 10:33
I am not sure I get the plan to solve the really difficult challenge of autonomous driving in towns and the country. Seems very difficult and not cost effective. However given how packed motorways/freeways (or whatever they are where you live) are autonomous driving must be an approach. Particularly in places where public transport is not used or available. Basically the driver is paying to be part of a train. The driver getting to the motorway, selecting destination and letting the wireless get them to the off ramp seems inevitable.

Tankertrashnav
7th Dec 2018, 10:40
A car is a status symbol, an extension of your personality

Mine is a 17 year old Volvo V70 automatic estate so in that case I am both low status and boring! My only criteria for cars are that they should be easy to drive, start every time and not break down and the old Volvo fits all the bills. If I could teach it to drive itself I would!

surely not
7th Dec 2018, 10:52
Self driving is already here (just a matter of cost) and the writing is in the wall. I'd say within a generation human driving will be forbidden.

The opportunity for mammoth queues is huge as the small side roads are no longer used with everyone being sent down major routes. Not sure how this new technology will cope with the myriad of small lanes and farmers dirt tracks that are still required for access in many areas.

Who will pay the speeding fine if the autonomous vehicle hasn't been updated with a temporary restriction or has just plain been incorrectly programmed?

Pontius Navigator
7th Dec 2018, 10:59
Cheltman, a perfect example. Go further. Your motorway no longer needs to be a strip on concrete 3-4 lanes wide. It can be discrete lanes like a railway.

An autonomous pod is fine for running around a city from park and ride, but my car is a luggage carrier. I have umbrellas, rainwear, footwear and luggage. It is also a mobile safe. I would not want to take all just-in-case stuff with me and use a left property facility - remember them?

jolihokistix
7th Dec 2018, 11:03
Why the Obsession with Autonomous Driving ?

Oh, come on, it's obvious. (Even Lemmings know the answer.)

cattletruck
7th Dec 2018, 11:04
Recently a motoring lift-out that I regularly read did something quite remarkable and critically investigated the truth about autonomous driving systems. The went through the systems of all the major manufacturers of this technology picking at features and flaws even looking at it from multiple points of view including legal ones.

In the end they concluded that all these autonomous driving systems are nothing more than marketing fluff as they all required human supervision to comply with all legal aspects of being in control of a moving vehicle. As driving is not particularly difficult then you got to agree with their final conclusion.

hiflymk3
7th Dec 2018, 11:21
Mine is a 17 year old Volvo V70 automatic estate so In that case I am both low status and boring! My only criteria for cars are that they should be easy to drive, start every time and not break down and the old Volvo fits both bills. If I could teach it to drive itself I would!
I'm with you on that, except mine's a Saab 95 auto estate and I love it.

I remember the 60/70s the AA published a magazine which had features about cars and living in the 21st century. There were illustrations of driverless pod like cars with happy occupants cruising down motorways that weaved between mile high skyscraper cities and a landscaped countryside. It looked sanitised and very boring and thankfully that vision hasn't happened in the UK yet. Electric cars yes but completely driverless on all our roads, I can't see it here in the near future.

PS, with the O2 meltdown yesterday imagine the chaos if similar occurred on autonomous roads.

I only need a car to get me from A to B, trouble is I live in Kew and work in Wye.

A_Van
7th Dec 2018, 11:22
Even if autonomous vehicles market appears to be a minor part of the whole market, it is still a multi-billion business. Hundreds of market research volumes have written covering various of use cases, risk analyses, etc. The bell started tolling some 10-12 years ago after successful DARPA Grand Challenge 2005. No way to reverse this trend.

But what a problem? Those who do not like (or even simply hate) driverless cars may not use them. Like those who "conceptually" do not use public transportation and prefer a "door-to-door" driving.
I will hardly imagine the situation when I would prefer not have a car and enjoy robots serving me, but maybe for my grand-grand kids this would not sound ugly...

meadowrun
7th Dec 2018, 12:29
Nanny State concepts.

...although looking at the masses, your average, LCD, few skills drivers, get worse every year.

They will bring all sorts of new types of accidents.

G0ULI
7th Dec 2018, 12:56
Autonomous trains operate in strictly controlled environments and yet even they are few and far between. All the great inventions that have taken off are those that grant people greater individual freedom, or the illusion of freedom. Cars themselves, motorcycles, light aircraft, smart phones and home computers to give just some examples. The demand just doesn't exist for driverless cars outside of crowded cities and even there a decent and efficient mass transport system would suit many people. While the ability to create a driverless car exists, most people see it as taking something away from their personal freedom. That is why they are unlikely to succeed in the marketplace.

Blacksheep
7th Dec 2018, 13:30
They will bring all sorts of new types of accidents.Autonomous cars are very few and far beteen but they have already managed to kill quite a few people.

racedo
7th Dec 2018, 13:31
Mine is a 17 year old Volvo V70 automatic estate so in that case I am both low status and boring!!

Kind of difficult to argue against you on that. :p

FakePilot
7th Dec 2018, 13:39
I think fools read "Golly Gee Technology" and believe it. I don't think it's impossible, but I think the actual self driving car you can sleep in on your way to work will be very different from expectations.
Wait, what was that about a glideslope in Hong Kong? Do you know how inaccurate sin/cos functions in computers are?

racedo
7th Dec 2018, 13:43
Personally think that increasing use of Public transport could eliminate the personal posession of a car. Many people in London do not own a car as have zero need, same with other major cities. We are all wedded to chucking 10-15k on a car and spending 1-2k a year just to have posession.

Make public transport FREE, increase it massively and use constant feeder services to hubs.

Yup you want to go to Bluewater Mall in Kent and spend a day shopping............ then pack it all in car and drive home. Why not change the dynamic, go shopping decide what you want, pay for it, store will deliver it next day along with every other thing you bought at the Mall. You go and have a nice meal, go to cinema and take transport home knowing that tomorrow everything you saw instore will be delivered right to your door.

Now you have changed the dynamic completely and maybe even better for the stores as you want X of which they have 5 on show, instead of you picking up what is instore they fulfil it from a logistics warehouse. Means they keep 5 instore on display, same in every store BUT crucially they don't replenish the store unless someone buys and takes it with them.

TURIN
7th Dec 2018, 13:54
A car is a status symbol, an extension of your personality. I have no interest in being picked by a self driving, silent egg.

It may well be an extension of your personality. For the rest of us its a means to an end. Unless everyone has the personality of a five door hatchback as those seem to be the most common.

Sultan Ismail
7th Dec 2018, 14:08
I recently transferred through Changi Airport Singapore and saw a train of driverless wheel chairs. The lead chair was occupied, followed by 10 other chairs some occupied others not with a 6" gap between each chair.
No physical connection between the chairs but absolutely even spacing, they came through at more than walking pace and were weaving through the pedestrian traffic. The image of empty wheel chairs weaving through the terminal is still with me.
I must say I think it is a good idea for airport terminals, Changi T3 is a good candidate venue for the Marathon.

racedo
7th Dec 2018, 14:26
It may well be an extension of your personality. For the rest of us its a means to an end. Unless everyone has the personality of a five door hatchback as those seem to be the most common.

I rent a car when I need one, this year for 4 months I used a car on 6 days, course if I had it I would have used it even more. But now if I need stuff I walk a mile to the shops and bring back what is needed.

Ancient Observer
7th Dec 2018, 14:31
TTN,
are you the one that always sits in the outside lane of any motorway I am on at 69.9 mph?

Volvo estates are generally driven by teachers who long to teach their version of driving to everyone else on the road.

Tankertrashnav
7th Dec 2018, 17:39
Nope, I'm the one in the inside lane at 60 mph, quaking as the 40 tonne HGVs thunder past. Fortunately I live 102 miles from the nearest motorway, and nowadays always take the train for journeys of over 100 miles, so the problem doesn't arise. I did use to be a teacher as it happens, but I don't like to be reminded of the fact!

racedo - dont worry, I'm not arguing either!

Pontius Navigator
7th Dec 2018, 23:03
Yet again a good case for autonomous vehicles on trunk roads - crash on the A1 at 1030 and cleared by 1530. Traffic was flowing but the tail back was 15 miles.
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Mechta
7th Dec 2018, 23:25
People still want to go places even after their health deteriorates to the point that they can't drive themselves there. Not everyone lives in a city with buses passing every few minutes.

Pappa Smurf
8th Dec 2018, 00:17
One of Aussies big miners has autonomous trucks and trains,but at least that's in an offroad environment.Miserable pricks trying to save a $

racedo
8th Dec 2018, 00:42
People still want to go places even after their health deteriorates to the point that they can't drive themselves there. Not everyone lives in a city with buses passing every few minutes.

It is why making it free changes the dynamics very easily. Many countrys have Transit style vans providing Public transport but UK insists on huge more expensive buses.

racedo
8th Dec 2018, 00:45
One of Aussies big miners has autonomous trucks and trains,but at least that's in an offroad environment.Miserable pricks trying to save a $

What is the casualty rate in mines ?

currawong
8th Dec 2018, 00:53
One of Aussies big miners has autonomous trucks and trains,but at least that's in an offroad environment.Miserable pricks trying to save a $

Believe that has not worked out quite as well as they had hoped.

Know some folks whose "semi autonomous" vehicle tried to kill them. Senses where one is on the road and auto corrects errors. Driver moves over for an oversize load travelling in the opposite direction, vehicle promptly steers them back into harms way. Exciting stuff.

n5296s
8th Dec 2018, 02:50
We had a street party in our street a few weeks back. Turns out two of my neighbours are in the autonomous vehicle industry - one runs the California research lab for a major manufacturer, the other founded a startup in the field. We had a long chat and they are both firmly of the opinion that AV technology is fine for highways and the like, but will never be able to handle urban streets like the one we were standing in. There are just too many false cues and strange things going on. If I had to routinely drive say I-5 to LA, or the M6 to Manchester, I would be delighted to have something that would drive up and down those highways. But the first and last mile of every journey, no thanks. Which is fine, as long as you don't buy into the whole AV Kool-Aid of autonomous taxis replacing private cars and so on.

Gertrude the Wombat
8th Dec 2018, 09:39
Know some folks whose "semi autonomous" vehicle tried to kill them. Senses where one is on the road and auto corrects errors. Driver moves over for an oversize load travelling in the opposite direction, vehicle promptly steers them back into harms way. Exciting stuff.
Is that the Oz scenario where the oncoming road train takes up the entire width of the tarmac so you pull over and drive on the sand to get past it?

currawong
8th Dec 2018, 11:24
Is that the Oz scenario where the oncoming road train takes up the entire width of the tarmac so you pull over and drive on the sand to get past it?

Not so much the width of the vehicle, but the width of its load that overhangs either side. Often some large piece of mining equipment or plant.

Katamarino
8th Dec 2018, 12:45
A car is a status symbol, an extension of your personality. I have no interest in being picked by a self driving, silent egg.

Maybe if you have a very fragile ego and nothing else interesting about you.

Shandy52
8th Dec 2018, 14:28
TTN,
are you the one that always sits in the outside lane of any motorway I am on at 69.9 mph?
Volvo estates are generally driven by teachers who long to teach their version of driving to everyone else on the road.

I feel this stereotype is due for retirement, as it dates back to the days of the Volvo 144 at least. Speaking for myself, I'm the one in lane 3 at 80-85mph, or doing 50mph along narrow Gloucestershire lanes in my 2002 Volvo automatic. Wonderful car, 3000rpm with 90 on the clock, but the MPG on trips to the shops is diabolical.

Pontius Navigator
8th Dec 2018, 15:10
Speaking for myself, I'm the one in lane 3 at 80-85mph.
Not behind me you're not 👼

Pontius Navigator
8th Dec 2018, 15:18
Many countrys have Transit style vans providing Public transport but UK insists on huge more expensive buses.
In our last District we had Call Connect. Basically a smaller bus that you could call and would connect you to the main route.

We also had the 'ghost ' bus. The problem is the bus needed to taken shoppers in in the morning, usually full, has gone out empty. Having brought shoppers and workers home at 5 returns to depot empty. During the day there will be early returning shoppers. Now utilisation crops up. Ideally you will use a small bus during the day but this means the larger bus is standing empty. Or you could run two small buses early and late but this might need more drivers.

Nothing is simple.

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JCviggen
8th Dec 2018, 16:30
The problem is that we're a long way from fully automated cars that work wherever you want to go. Everything until then is a solution that needs human monitoring but humans, particularly those armed with nothing more than a regular driving license, get bored and have little discipline when it comes to constantly keeping en eye on what HAL is doing. If it works fine three days in a row odds are they'll start reading the newspaper with a cup of coffee instead.

Pontius Navigator
8th Dec 2018, 18:50
Viggen prompts a thought. How would an autonomous vehicle cope with snow and ice? Would it need to know the tyre spec or would it base its commands on feedback? Would it learn from previous feedback?

G-CPTN
8th Dec 2018, 19:05
How would an autonomous vehicle cope with snow and ice?
I grew up (and now live) adjacent to a rural area that is subject to significant winter weather conditions. Some roads have no 'boundaries' - just open countryside (no kerbs or definable edges - just snow-posts to show the snowplough driver where to aim.
And conditions can vary immensely ove a short distance - we can have no snow where I live whilst the road can be blocked by drifts a couple of miles away (up the valley side).

Pontius Navigator
8th Dec 2018, 19:53
G-CPTN, and?

Would the autonomous vehicle give up as it has no road feed back or would it assess its position on Sat Navs?

A real driver might stay at home or make a decision to press on. It might have a sensor suite that could see through the snow.

G-CPTN
8th Dec 2018, 19:59
What happens if (when?) an autonomous vehicle gets stuck - whether on an incline or by confusion over no identifiable limit to the highway?

Would it keep trying? - or shutdown?

A human driver could utilise a shovel and/or grit to regain traction.

In the 1950s, I would swap the drive axle wheels for ultimate traction tyres and fit chains to the removed wheels.
In extremis I could fit the chained wheels.

Pontius Navigator
8th Dec 2018, 21:19
I think our metro innovators haven't thought that one through.
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Mechta
8th Dec 2018, 21:56
There are a few scenarios which should be made more entertaining with an autonomous car:

Launching a boat.
Parking, say, a glider trailer, between two others.
Entering a car park with a height restrictor with a couple of bicycles on the roof.
Travelling around and parking in the typical boggy field which constitutes a car park at festivals, airshows etc.
Getting up on wheel ramps.

racedo
8th Dec 2018, 22:00
In our last District we had Call Connect. Basically a smaller bus that you could call and would connect you to the main route.

We also had the 'ghost ' bus. The problem is the bus needed to taken shoppers in in the morning, usually full, has gone out empty. Having brought shoppers and workers home at 5 returns to depot empty. During the day there will be early returning shoppers. Now utilisation crops up. Ideally you will use a small bus during the day but this means the larger bus is standing empty. Or you could run two small buses early and late but this might need more drivers.

Nothing is simple.

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If you run a continuos service through the day people will use. Double up if needed at peak times or different buses. Make public transport profits untaxable and or invest Govt money in it.

WingNut60
8th Dec 2018, 22:20
There are a few scenarios which should be made more entertaining with an autonomous car:

Launching a boat.
Parking, say, a glider trailer, between two others.
Entering a car park with a height restrictor with a couple of bicycles on the roof.
Travelling around and parking in the typical boggy field which constitutes a car park at festivals, airshows etc.
Getting up on wheel ramps.



Am I missing something, or is it really intended that these autonomous vehicles will not have a "manual" mode?
Maybe even a "limp" mode or "alternate law"?

racedo
8th Dec 2018, 22:30
Am I missing something, or is it really intended that these autonomous vehicles will not have a "manual" mode?
Maybe even a "limp" mode or "alternate law"?

Porsche and BMWs will have limp D**k mode.............. oh wait that is just the driver. :E

Tankertrashnav
8th Dec 2018, 23:53
...or doing 50mph along narrow Gloucestershire lanes in my 2002 Volvo automatic.

Please advise me if you ever come to Cornwall on holiday, and I will avoid the narrow Cornish lanes for the duration. I don't want my 2001 Volvo automatic to be hit by your 2002 Volvo automatic! Trouble, is the 6' "hedges" that line these single lane roads are actually thinly disguised stone walls and there will be nowhere for me to go when you come around the corner doing 50!

Rush2112
9th Dec 2018, 01:51
Well, I live in Singapore and the standard of driving here is so poor, I think it would be an improvement to stop them driving themselves. Given the population is about 5.6m, land area less than 300 sq miles, they routinely have 150,000 accidents a year here.

tdracer
9th Dec 2018, 02:11
There are a few scenarios which should be made more entertaining with an autonomous car:

Launching a boat.
Parking, say, a glider trailer, between two others.
Entering a car park with a height restrictor with a couple of bicycles on the roof.
Travelling around and parking in the typical boggy field which constitutes a car park at festivals, airshows etc.
Getting up on wheel ramps.



Ford already has a 'backing assist' available on their pickup trucks that can do a better job of those first two than many human drivers. Eventually you'll see sensor equipped trailers that talk to the vehicle to tell it where the trailer needs to go - at which time they'll be able to equal even the best human driver (and they won't need a spotter to tell them where to go). For the third one, the sensors at the car park will warn the vehicle that it's too tall - which would be a dramatic improvement over today's idiot drivers who regularly smack car park roofs (and overpasses) when they neglect to check clearances.
Many of you are making the common error of basing the future on current technology, not what's going to be developed by clever people. How many people predicted 30 years ago what cell phones have morphed into? I recently took delivery of a new BMW - I passed on getting any of the optional driver's aids, but it still has impressive capabilities to tell me if I'm messing up (a few of which I'm not even sure how it does it - and my expertise is in control systems!)
After decades of steadily improving road safety, the accident and death rates have started going back up due to distracted drivers paying attention to their phone instead of the road.
We're just scratching the surface of what autonomous vehicles will be able to do. Soon we'll have vehicles talking to each other - doing things like warning that the leading car is slowing or turning, or that there is some sort of problem ahead. When you have a group of vehicles talking to each other, they'll be able to do things such as follow much more closely since they don't need to account for reaction times - and the traffic carrying capacity of the major roads will increase dramatically.
It's going to take a while for the infrastructure catch up, but I foresee a future where non-autonomous vehicles will be considered a hazard and will be banned from major roads.

FullOppositeRudder
9th Dec 2018, 02:26
I look forward to viewing the traffic flow around the Arc de Triomphe when driverless vehicle are the norm. It's already highly entertaining (as a pedestrian innocent bystander).

Factually - as we seem to be discovering in aviation - as automation moves in, human skills become rusty and may even totally desert whoever is at the controls (or steering wheel) it all turns to porridge. I'm already aware of one situation which could have turned out very badly when friend's expensive 4WD's automatic safety features and cruise control went their own ways, leaving him to go for the brakes to avert a potential catastrophe.

jolihokistix
9th Dec 2018, 06:13
How will the different systems interact with each other I wonder, say when a Chinese AI car and a German AI car come face to face at 50 mph down a wet country lane? How will blame be apportioned?

layman
9th Dec 2018, 06:19
Perhaps we should agree on which level of autonomous vehicles we are discussing - there are 5 levels defined. Level 5 is probably only suited for motorway / urban use. Level 4 for most other environments & lower levels for more regional & remote area use.

Savings to society as a whole are projected (in Australia alone) to be in the billions of dollars a year (about a 90% reduction in road fatalities for starters).

30 years (?) from now only the wealthy will be able to afford to drive - insurance premiums will to too expensive for us plebs

Pontius Navigator
9th Dec 2018, 08:26
From time to time a feature in my car stops working. Sometimes is is trivial such as the clock has reset the hours to 12. Then you notice the sat nav bug is tracking South as I drive north.

Now that could be entertaining if I was in a car train. The solution is to stop and reboot the computer.

I had another sat nav issue around Southampton. It would lock up. It might have been a general mapping error or a glitch in the downloaded data but the only consistency was Southampton and not a particular spot.

And somewhere in the thread above was talk of totally autonomous pods. At least in a single city coherence should not be an issue.

We have all come across routed down steps, through bollards, over walls etc. I accept that better AI systems will know when one car finds the error or new one way street and informs all local traffic and updates a central server. That will make Brexit seems as simple as a walk in the park.

tdracer
9th Dec 2018, 08:42
How will the different systems interact with each other I wonder, say when a Chinese AI car and a German AI car come face to face at 50 mph down a wet country lane? How will blame be apportioned?

You mean like the internet? Or radios? Or ATC? There are countless systems that work seamlessly across international borders - all it takes is some smart people to agree to a basic framework. That is one of the more trivial issues to be solved.
Besides, it's not going to be that hard to come up with autonomous cars that are better than most human drivers - the bar is currently pretty low...

Oh, PN, 90% of what's making Brexit a mess is egos and politics. The actual technical stuff is fairly straight forward.

Pontius Navigator
9th Dec 2018, 08:55
You mean like the internet? Which is broadly compatible but treated differently in a multitude of platforms.

Or radios? Provided the all use the same transmission protocol - AM, FM, digital and have sufficient channel separation or bandwidth.

Or ATC? With huge human interaction.

There are countless systems that work seamlessly across international borders - all it takes is some smart people to agree to a basic framework. For instance military Link systems. The major problem there is system upgraded developed by a wealthy country which creates major improvements at a cost that can not be afforded by a poor country.

That is one of the some of the issues to be solved. But progress will be extremely slow and cautious. One solution, as in aircraft, is zoned in which only compliant vehicles are permitted.

I will just end with two examples of global incompatibility 110v/220v AC or DC and LHD/RHD.

Gertrude the Wombat
9th Dec 2018, 09:59
Trouble, is the 6' "hedges" that line these single lane roads are actually thinly disguised stone walls and there will be nowhere for me to go when you come around the corner doing 50!
And my car had a dent to prove it. Even though the person driving at the time knew perfectly well that that particular bit of vegetation on that particular corner contained that particular rock.

G-CPTN
9th Dec 2018, 10:16
I have zero experience with autonomous vehicles (not even 'park assist' other than the beeping proximity sensors - which seem possible to confuse).
How does such a vehicle receive instructions?
Does one input a postcode?
My satnav is vague when the actual destination is reached (no doubt because postcodes are not pinpoint specific but area specific).
What - after reaching the destination? Does the vehicle attempt to return to base for further instructions?
Perhaps the autonomous vehicle selects a random route and destination that it fancies? Or does it just shut down and await further instruction?

I think we should be told . . .

hiflymk3
9th Dec 2018, 10:46
I've had autonomous driving for years. I receive instructions from Mrs H and off we go.

Used to drive up and down to London frequently, I'd get home and think, I don't remember driving through X. It was as if I had an internal auto pilot that got me home. Anyone else experience this?

mikemmb
9th Dec 2018, 10:55
I have zero experience with autonomous vehicles (not even 'park assist' other than the beeping proximity sensors - which seem possible to confuse).
How does such a vehicle receive instructions?
Does one input a postcode?
My satnav is vague when the actual destination is reached (no doubt because postcodes are not pinpoint specific but area specific).
What - after reaching the destination? Does the vehicle attempt to return to base for further instructions?
Perhaps the autonomous vehicle selects a random route and destination that it fancies? Or does it just shut down and await further instruction?

I think we should be told . . .

Try googling "What3Words" for a different perspective?
It may not be perfect but sheds a light on what may be possible.

treadigraph
9th Dec 2018, 11:01
Used to drive up and down to London frequently, I'd get home and think, I don't remember driving through X. It was as if I had an internal auto pilot that got me home. Anyone else experience this?

Quite often cycle familiar routes on auto pilot and not particularly remember the boring bits but deal perfectly safely with junctions, helping traffic overtake, unexpected hazards, etc; and if anywhere near Biggin Hill have an ear cocked for the sound of a Merlin engine. Don't drive that much these days so tend to concentrate more because I am aware I'm a bit rusty and usually not familiar with the car I'm driving.

hiflymk3
9th Dec 2018, 11:09
I might have passed you a few times en route to Hastings.

Blues&twos
9th Dec 2018, 14:00
The internal auto-pilot/not remembering parts of a journey is very common, particularly if you frequently drive the same route at the same times of day (i.e. commuters, delivery drivers with a 'round' etc).
While not ideal (!), it's interesting that it's possible to navigate complex road junctions, roundabouts and multi-lane one way systems apparently without noticing you're doing it, and having only a sketchy memory, if any, of it afterwards

racedo
9th Dec 2018, 14:35
Used to drive up and down to London frequently, I'd get home and think, I don't remember driving through X. It was as if I had an internal auto pilot that got me home. Anyone else experience this?

Yup.
20 plus years ago doing a 140-150 mile commute where would stay over some of the time. Long long work hours and drove home rather than stay sometime. Couple of occasions I had no recollection of which route as there were 2-3 I had used.
On one occasion woke up think I was in hotel and wondering how I had got home, as didn't remember it but in kitchen sink were items where I had clearly cooked and eaten dinner.

dogsridewith
9th Dec 2018, 17:47
There are a few scenarios which should be made more entertaining with an autonomous car:

Launching a boat.
Parking, say, a glider trailer, between two others.
Entering a car park with a height restrictor with a couple of bicycles on the roof.
Travelling around and parking in the typical boggy field which constitutes a car park at festivals, airshows etc.
Getting up on wheel ramps.

I don't know more than the Ford truck TV ad, but there's some button the guy twists on dash to back the boat trailer towards the ramp. (Where the ad discusses a couple other things Hal assists...maybe parallel park.) Maybe the larger trailer/boat would hide the view of rear facing sensors integral to full autonomous?

Pontius Navigator
9th Dec 2018, 18:59
Used to drive up and down to London frequently, I'd get home and think, I don't remember driving through X. It was as if I had an internal auto pilot that got me home. Anyone else experience this?
Some years ago I had a long boring commute. About half way on a 5 mile straight I would drink the rest of my breakfast tea. On foggy days I would often arrive at work not having drunk my tea. It was not the effort required to drive in fog but the lack of a visual cue to start drinking.

Yes, occasionally having missed some route cues I become aware at a particular point but, as it is not a normal 'check point' , can not remember exactly where I am on the route, 'have I passed X?'.

ShyTorque
9th Dec 2018, 20:44
Used to drive up and down to London frequently, I'd get home and think, I don't remember driving through X. It was as if I had an internal auto pilot that got me home. Anyone else experience this?

Well, I once woke up at 7 a.m. and noticed I had slept under the kitchen table next to the the dog's basket and that I was still wearing my traditional German felt hat. I blamed the Oktoberfest as much as anything. But I'm sure I hadn't driven there.

FullOppositeRudder
9th Dec 2018, 23:04
I'd get home and think, I don't remember driving through X. It was as if I had an internal auto pilot that got me home. Anyone else experience this?

I've been through this experience in my younger days (well back in the last century) coming home from dances and associated activities where just occasionally one needed to first detour to deliver an interesting and delightful passenger to her abode. I'd arrive back on the farm, having no recollection of coming through the local village, and yet, somehow I must have done so... I never actually totally dozed off, but I must have been very close to it.

Tankertrashnav
10th Dec 2018, 00:06
Bit of thread drift but who remembers the magic taxis in Limassol? You got in the back of an old Merc 190D in Limassol, closed your eyes, opened them, slid across the seat and got out at the guardroom at Akrotiri.

Never could work out how they did it :confused:

Loose rivets
10th Dec 2018, 01:29
Autonomousnessness is a great thing. I got my pal his first taste of it when his throttle cable bust. It was in Ireland.

Junction, slacken string from my position in the rear seat. Look both ways, gently open the throttle and we're on our way. Everything was going so well - until a Trabant with a redfaced local came around the bend on the wrong side. My pal calmly passes him with the twigs brushing the right side of his Rover 3.5 V8 . Little garage mends cable and we're driving back with me now in the front and the Trabant appears in front of us. My pal moves to the right without a word.

"It was the same bloke!!!!" Screams I.

"Ah, I know. He always does that."

I later got complimented on my accelerative anticipation.

jolihokistix
10th Dec 2018, 03:53
I woke up at my desk at work.

As on any other day, my trusty robot Jeeves had gently done the 3xsh for me, dressed me, walked my legs, put me in my autonomous car, and carried me here.

"In yer dreams!" did I hear you say?

Imagegear
10th Dec 2018, 06:38
I cannot even begin to imagine being driven autonomously by anything on the roads down here. Just driving myself up to Gourdon or Isola has me quivering on every bend in case I meet an oncoming truck, bus, motorbike, flock of hikers/hunters, donkey, horses, tractors, rockfall, lost tourists from the UK on the wrong side of the road, river running across the road, landslip (including the road), escaped criminals, illegal immigrants, etc. I shall await the development of said vehicles with interest.

IG

jolihokistix
10th Dec 2018, 07:10
Sounds wonderful. Drone taxi anyone?

Pontius Navigator
10th Dec 2018, 08:47
Bit of thread drift but who remembers the magic taxis in Limassol? You got in the back of an old Merc 190D in Limassol, closed your eyes, opened them, slid across the seat and got out at the guardroom at Akrotiri.

Never could work out how they did it :confused:
Worked the other way too. After a lunch time session in the Mess, went to go to bed. Woke up in Niazziz.