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xclozano
30th Nov 2018, 06:46
I'm really interesting in coming down to Australia and flying for a bit. I have quite a few mates in Brisbane and Melbourne. Very familiar (and in love) with the country.

I know you guys, much like the US, are experiencing a "pilot shortage". I know recently Australia has opened up visas for pilots so they can be recruited from overseas.

What are some Australian regional carriers that will sponsor an American on a visa ? What are some things I should know as an American coming into the aviation profession in Australia ?

I would love to come fly to QantasLink and move on to Qantas mainline. My goal would be to settle in Australia and carry out the rest of my career down there.

And before you get on your soapbox...I realise Aussie airline pilots make less than their American counterparts. Thats not important to me.

Thank you for your time and input.

mattyj
30th Nov 2018, 09:21
In theory there’s a pilot shortage..in practice, the airlines are refusing to deal with it. There’s also a misguided notion that Australia trains superior pilots to anywhere in else in the world so by definition, that makes you inferior. You’re facing an uphill battle, however...if you have training experience and time on type you may find a home in Australia. QantasLink and Qantas will be a bridge too far though..that’s Astronaut territory. Your best bet is a second tier operator..you don’t have a Saab 340 rating by any chance? TRE even?

to be honest, if you’re really serious. Find one of the Aussie corporate jet operators that have chosen to leave their aircraft on the FAA (N) register. Especially if you have a global or gulfstream rating

rep
30th Nov 2018, 09:23
Wheres the popcorn :8

bafanguy
30th Nov 2018, 10:13
I'm really interesting in coming down to Australia and flying for a bit.

Perhaps if you gave your audience a rundown on your current quals and background, they could give you more specific advice ? Just a thought...

xclozano
30th Nov 2018, 14:05
Perhaps if you gave your audience a rundown on your current quals and background, they could give you more specific advice ? Just a thought...

As it stands right now, 3000hrs TT/fixed wing/multi engine/turbine/instrument

Have spent the last few years flying as a captain for a regional airline flying the Bombardier CRJ.

4 Holer
30th Nov 2018, 15:03
ARE YOU INSANE STAY IS USA ........... Australia is a remote, 3rd world Socialist Island in the Southwest Pacific. The Aviation regulator is worst in the world....

clear to land
30th Nov 2018, 16:57
Come on over-just realise that things are very different. There is a belief in Australia that they know everything about aviation. It is an entrenched belief. Anyone who has flown overseas is considered inferior-somehow lacking. Australia is unique. Qantaslink is bringing in lots of 'Instructors' especially from Sth Africa on Visas with a path to PR. My Sth African friends tell me that most of these pilots are not Instructors on Type-just that at some point in the past they have held an Instructors Rating. The thing is this allows the Australian companies to not increase pay as it should. Good luck to the individuals as they are leaving a beautiful country that is rapidly becoming uninhabitable. I wish them well. I also wish they were not being hired under false pretences and that the Australian Pilot representative bodies would actually challenge this. Of course I also wish to win lotto!

Capt Fathom
30th Nov 2018, 19:00
Looks like the right bait has been used! :E

hoss
30th Nov 2018, 23:33
Mate, I had to check it was the 1st of December not April!

4 Holer (#7) nailed it, we are a third world country but have safe drinking water.

You would be crazy to leave. Stay a proud American.

xclozano
1st Dec 2018, 00:04
I’ve been to Australia many times over the years and have found Australian living standards far superior to American ones.

Wages might not be as good for pilots as they are in the US, but you guys have a better healthcare system, better education system, much more liveable cities, no mass shootings, better worker protections.

I’d like to raise a family and Australia is a much better place than America to raise kids.

Bend alot
1st Dec 2018, 01:02
There are only (currently) a limited number of visas for pilots that give access to Permanent Residency. I expect that there will be more allocations depending on political donations.

If you have a partner that has a skill that is in the shortage, that may also be a thing to look at. Keep in mind some skilled shortage occupations do not have a path to PR.

Your reasons to move are valid.

Orange future
1st Dec 2018, 01:06
“Australia is a remote”
It is.

“3rd world”
No, far from it. Higher standard of living than the US.

“Socialist”
Not really.

“The Aviation regulator is worst in the world....”
No worse than the FAA although the standard of the regulator has zero to do with the decision.

But yes, you would be insane to move to Australia.

Berealgetreal
1st Dec 2018, 04:31
All the reasons you listed are valid. Australia is however in someways moving toward the American model so don’t expect it to last forever. The socialist/marxist thing is gaining momentum, it’s everywhere particularly in the media. A lot is very very subtle and most people don’t notice it. It’s becoming embedded in the thinking. You will also see some of it emerging as early as preschool level.

The pilot wages give a basic middle class living in the suburbs. Sydney and Melbourne are expensive.

With your experience you will have no trouble. I’d recommend trying for Qantas mainline first. Best of luck.

Seagull201
1st Dec 2018, 06:52
I'm really interesting in coming down to Australia and flying for a bit. I have quite a few mates in Brisbane and Melbourne. Very familiar (and in love) with the country.

I know you guys, much like the US, are experiencing a "pilot shortage". I know recently Australia has opened up visas for pilots so they can be recruited from overseas.

What are some Australian regional carriers that will sponsor an American on a visa ? What are some things I should know as an American coming into the aviation profession in Australia ?

I would love to come fly to QantasLink and move on to Qantas mainline. My goal would be to settle in Australia and carry out the rest of my career down there.

And before you get on your soapbox...I realise Aussie airline pilots make less than their American counterparts. Thats not important to me.

Thank you for your time and input.

Responding to your mail Sir, starting from line 1:

Quote: I'm really interesting in coming down to Australia and flying for a bit.
A bit?
A little, what ever you want to call it, you might as well stay here, once your here.

Quote: I have quite a few mates in Brisbane and Melbourne. Very familiar (and in love) with the country.

Australia gives out about 200,000 residency visas a year ( all categories), it will reduce to 160,000 next year.
There are 30,000 Australians per year, that aren't in love with OZ anymore and leave the country permanently.

Quote: What are some Australian regional carriers that will sponsor an American on a visa ?
Talk to REX airlines and Qlink (Qantas regional), if you can fly a Saab 340 or Dash 8, these are the people to talk to.

Quote:I know you guys, much like the US, are experiencing a "pilot shortage".

There's no pilot shortage here, only a shortage for flight instructors, nothing here compared to the U.S.
The general aviation charter sector (companies with piston twin engine aircraft), in Australia, are shrinking each year, companies are being forced to close.

Quote:I would love to come fly to QantasLink and move on to Qantas mainline.

Nobody is telling you not to come here, you could be good at all those psychometric testing at Qantas and extra medicals needed, just to get a job,
they will take you, BUT nobody on this website, CAN help you to get a visa to come here.
It's got to be your OWN work, to get the required visa.
It can be done.

Quote: And before you get on your soapbox

Soapbox?

You know something, i enjoy watching the "bold and beautiful", and Monday's show, will be the cream episode, since the show started.

Look, rent is about $450 a week for a 3 bedroom unit in the western suburbs of Sydney, a house, not under $550 a week.
A unit costs $430K in Sydney's west (1 hour drive to airport), a house costs $650K in the west to 1 million, a little bit closer and upwards.

I read the rest of your posts, it's really NOT worth being here, the tax system is high, dollar isn't worth much when travelling.
If your partner isn't working, you will get nowhere financially, on a single income here.

You can do much better in Aviation and financially,staying where you are, in the short and long term!

Capt Fathom
1st Dec 2018, 09:31
Seagull201.
Any chance you could provide a summary?
:bored:

dr dre
1st Dec 2018, 10:04
You know what mate, you’re spot on with what you’re saying here:

I’ve been to Australia many times over the years and have found Australian living standards far superior to American ones.

Wages might not be as good for pilots as they are in the US, but you guys have a better healthcare system, better education system, much more liveable cities, no mass shootings, better worker protections.

I’d like to raise a family and Australia is a much better place than America to raise kids.

I’ve studied the American way of living and think our standards and lifestyle here are much better. Most commentators here probably don’t realise a lot of basic facts about the United States and things like how little annual leave you receive or how costly the healthcare system is. That alone would cancel out any benefit with lower taxes.

The two places where housing is overvalued are Sydney and Melbourne, the rest of the country is more sensible. Those two cities will undergo a correction over the next few years anyway. The current government is reducing migration numbers but there’s a 98% chance they will be replaced early next year so that probably won’t last.

Anyone here saying Australia is a “third world country” or “socialist/Marxist” needs to go to an actual 3rd world or Marxist country. You’ve even said it yourself that after doing your own research you believe Australia is a better place to raise your family. I’d contact the major regional airlines or try looking at the “Latest Jobs” section on the AFAP website to look for opportunities you may be eligible for.

Australians can’t complain too much as there are plenty of Aussies working in airlines in the US at the moment, we should at least be reciprocal.

Seagull201
1st Dec 2018, 10:18
Seagull201.
Any chance you could provide a summary?
:bored:

Summary?

If a Saab 340 Captain earns $120K annually, 10K a month, the ato (tax office) pay as you go website, says, take home is $7,140 a month (It's good money).

If a Dash 8 Captain earns at least $150k annually, $12,500 a month, the ato pay as you go website says, take home is $8,665 a month (partner doesn't need to work).

If the gentleman wants to come here and work as a pilot, there are opportunities for persons possessing his skills, now and in the future.
The cost of living is quite high here.

It's up to the gentleman to make enquiries, on his own behalf, to REX, Qlink, or applying for migration to Australia.

Personally, i see better opportunities in the U.S in terms of aviation work progression to bigger and better things and cost of living,
also housing affordability.

If you're talking about immigration numbers, they're figures i've heard throughout the year, on the radio and talk back, and have come across
news articles.

4 Holer
1st Dec 2018, 16:32
Seagull the USD is approx 0.70 USD $4900 per month after he pays rent in Australia and his first electricity bill the guy is better off staying in USA at Walmart....

hoss
1st Dec 2018, 20:50
To assist the decision making process.

You mention you would like to raise a family. Great you will probably want to live in a house. Assuming SYD, the average price is just north of 1 million.

A house at that price is probably 1.5 hour drive each way. Expect to do this 4-5 times a week, there is probably a podcast you could listen to that teaches Arabic.

You will start on FO pay so reduce those figures by 30%.

I’m guessing your lifestyle is better where you are. Just remember if you end up in SYD it will be tough.
In my opinion you need to be on $250K minimum to live comfortably in SYD anything less would be a ‘battle’.

If your arriving with about 3-4 million ready to settle down. Then relax, disregard all the above, enjoy the beers that will alleviate the frustrations of aviation over here.

Welcome.

WannaBeBiggles
1st Dec 2018, 21:13
but you guys have a better healthcare system

Yes we do, but as a non-permanent resident you will be required to hold private health insurance. Unlike the States, companies in Australia do not provide medical insurance beyond loss of licence and mandatory workplace accident insurance.

Make sure you have a look at the cost of private health insurance without the Medicare Rebate applied, especially if you are over 31 and factor that into your take-home pay.

Unless you have a whole heap of command on a regional turboprop and possibly check and training quals, you will be hard pressed to get a 457 visa. Also, even if you got into QLink, I'm pretty sure your visa will be held by QLink and not Qantas, so there is no way to transfer to Qantas as they do not have approval for 457 visa pilots.

Bend alot
1st Dec 2018, 22:32
I actually know a fair bit about Australian visas.

Fact - you do not need permanent residency to access Medicare.

Fact - The reduction of issued visas recently is due to the reduction in "Skilled Worker" applicants. The planning level remained the same as other years (actually slightly increased) just not enough applied.

Fact - if you are serious in moving to Australia you need to consult with a Registered Migration Agent. I know of around 6 that I would happily recommend as very good.

Fact - There are far better places to live than Sydney. But for the unlucky, many companies have a "Sydney Allowance" that assist a bit.

Bend alot
1st Dec 2018, 22:40
Seems the average exchange rate over last 10 years is $0.86652831
Dec 2009 - $ 0.79211631
Dec 2010 - $0.91969131
Dec 2011 - $1.03385331
Dec 2012 - $1.03593731
Dec 2013 - $0.96791531
Dec 2014 - $0.90281331
Dec 2015 - $0.75212431
Dec 2016 - $0.74366431
Dec 2017 - $0.7668301
Dec 2018 - $0.750338

maggot
1st Dec 2018, 22:56
If you want to come over for the lifestyle etc, do it. Come on in, the waters warm. It is pricey and the industry is kinda inbred. Property is silly but if you're not high maintenance you'll find a nice spot for yourself depending on your job location and what you like to do.
welcome

dr dre
2nd Dec 2018, 00:14
I’m guessing your lifestyle is better where you are. Just remember if you end up in SYD it will be tough.

There is much more to Australia than Sydney. And America isn’t always the cheaper option. If the OP is based in a major city like New York or San Francisco they’ll either have a more expensive lifestyle than they would have in Australia or they’ll be undertaking a considerable commute to live somewhere cheaper.

Bend alot
2nd Dec 2018, 01:23
Every year for as far back as I could check the migration "Planning Level" numbers have been meet within a handful of the published levels.

Last year the number fell short by around 30,000 in the Skilled Migration sector, the other targets were reached. The general opinion for this reduction is the uncertainty of our governments and the policies they keep changing. Things like the "Backpacker Tax" and the 457 abolishment have made the prospective applicant consider other countries for migration. Many people in large city's like Sydney and Melbourne are of the opinion that our migration levels are too high - the reality is it is too small and while these two city's get a disproportionate number of migrants compared to the rest of Australia neither city has put in the required infrastructure/policy to grow. Simply take a look at Sydney, single airport and the restrictions on that - no infrastructure (2nd airport) and a curfew (a restriction on types that can be used 146 only I think) a policy that is political suicide to touch.

"While the headline planning figure has not changed since 2012–13, a number of recent policy decisions are changing the composition and actual size of the Migration Program. The planning level itself has changed from a target to a ceiling, as noted in Minister Dutton’s media release for the 2017–18 Budget. In 2016–17, for the first time, there was a large discrepancy between the planning level and the number of permanent residency visas granted. It may be the case future discrepancies exist for 2017–18 and into the forward estimates period."

There is actually an increase of around 2,000 places but they don't count the humanitarian numbers in these figures.

While many of you have posted Australia is not all roses, it is still a pretty good place to live and bring up a family. While many see allowing pilots in on visas is a bad thing and is driving down wage growth, I think many other factors are controlling wage growth even within the industry. If you look at the difference in pay for pilots between Qantas and Jetstar (owned by Qantas) you could say because Jestar pilots are working for less than the Qantas counterparts they stopping the wage growth of the Qantas pilots. I see having good people come here with good intentions is a good thing.

Lead Balloon
2nd Dec 2018, 08:10
<snip>Anyone here saying Australia is a “third world country” <snip> needs to go to an actual 3rd world <snip> country.The generally-agreed statement is that Australia is the only third world aviation nation where you can drink the water. The word “aviation” in that statement is important. Anyone here saying it is not needs to fly in an actual first world aviation nation.

Bend alot
2nd Dec 2018, 09:00
The generally-agreed statement is that Australia is the only third world aviation nation where you can drink the water. The word “aviation” in that statement is important. Anyone here saying it is not needs to fly in an actual first world aviation nation.

Adelaide - Lead Balloon?

Lead Balloon
2nd Dec 2018, 21:25
Too cryptic for me, Bend.

Bend alot
2nd Dec 2018, 22:33
When comments like " Nothing wrong with Adelaide water as long as you chew it properly" are made, maybe drink bottled water!

And this from the tap water championships-

We're definitely in Marysville. So, I've got to ask, how do you feel about Adelaide's tap water?
David: Well, having been brought up with Adelaide water, we think it's quite drinkable. Therefore, everything else is theoretically an improvement on that.
June: We're hardened. It's got to be pretty bad before we refuse to drink it.

https://www.greenleft.org.au/content/murky-truth-about-adelaide-water

https://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/taste-of-our-tap-water-to-improve/news-story/9b1edc94b2b897f6c6d28538ff64037b

Lead Balloon
3rd Dec 2018, 01:03
Got it! Yes, the saying would be more accurate if it said: Australia is the only third world aviation nation where you can drink the tap water at many places...

oicur12.again
3rd Dec 2018, 17:14
There is a lot of misinformation flying around this thread regarding the lifestyles enjoyed by pilots in the US compared to Australia.

An apples to apples comparison would see Australian pilots fair much better than most expect.

“The generally-agreed statement is that Australia is the only third world aviation nation where you can drink the water. The word “aviation” in that statement is important. Anyone here saying it is not needs to fly in an actual first world aviation nation.”

I am interested to know what exactly constitutes “third world” in the aviation sector down under as apposed to the “first world” to which you refer. Can you provide some detailed examples?

“The socialist/marxist thing is gaining momentum”

Interesting, can you provide some examples?

Lead Balloon
3rd Dec 2018, 19:01
I could provide many, many detailed third world examples.

But let’s start with the ‘jewel in the Australian crown’: YSCB.

The capital city.

An inexorably diminishing and decrepit collection of GA aircraft banished to the grass.

A decades-old portable building decorated with coiled razor wire and a panoramic view of the ground support equipment graveyard is the ‘facility’ for GA plebs.

One AVGAS bowser - bad luck if it breaks down or is empty. There used to be three different suppliers and even delivery by truck on the line.

One flying training organisation with merely a ‘satellite’ presence rather than ‘head office’. One. There used to be half a dozen.

One GA maintenance organisation, but mainly for rotary wing aircraft. One.

And don’t arrive too early in your big jet: Sleepy hollow G airspace.

YSCB is a living, physical manifestation of what’s been done to GA and aviation infrastructure in Australia.

Throw a dart at a map of the USA and do a comparison of the GA facilities, businesses and activities in whatever happens to be the nearest city - forget capitals.

WannaBeBiggles
3rd Dec 2018, 21:31
I actually know a fair bit about Australian visas.

Fact - you do not need permanent residency to access Medicare.


From 14 September 2009, if you apply for Visa Subclass 457 you will be required to make arrangements for a minimum level of health insurance prior to the grant of the visa. You will need to maintain this insurance for yourself, and your family if they are joining you on the same visa, for the duration of your stay in Australia. For details of the required minimum level of insurance, you can refer to the Department of Home Affairs - information on Visa 457 (http://www.homeaffairs.gov.au/Trav/Visa-1/457-).

The only caveat is if you come from a country which has a reciprocal health agreement. Which are;

Belgium (https://www.humanservices.gov.au/individuals/services/medicare/reciprocal-health-care-agreements/visitors-australia/medical-care-visitors-australia/visiting-from-belgium)
Finland (https://www.humanservices.gov.au/individuals/services/medicare/reciprocal-health-care-agreements/visitors-australia/medical-care-visitors-australia/visiting-from-finland)
Italy (https://www.humanservices.gov.au/individuals/services/medicare/reciprocal-health-care-agreements/visitors-australia/medical-care-visitors-australia/visiting-from-italy) – you don’t need to have been living in Italy, but you must be an Italian citizen and meet the other agreement conditions
Malta (https://www.humanservices.gov.au/individuals/services/medicare/reciprocal-health-care-agreements/visitors-australia/medical-care-visitors-australia/visiting-from-malta)
Netherlands (https://www.humanservices.gov.au/individuals/services/medicare/reciprocal-health-care-agreements/visitors-australia/medical-care-visitors-australia/visitors-from-netherlands)
New Zealand (https://www.humanservices.gov.au/individuals/services/medicare/reciprocal-health-care-agreements/visitors-australia/medical-care-visitors-australia/visiting-from-new-zealand)
Norway (https://www.humanservices.gov.au/individuals/services/medicare/reciprocal-health-care-agreements/visitors-australia/medical-care-visitors-australia/visiting-from-norway)
Ireland (https://www.humanservices.gov.au/individuals/services/medicare/reciprocal-health-care-agreements/visitors-australia/medical-care-visitors-australia/visiting-from-republic-ireland)
Slovenia (https://www.humanservices.gov.au/individuals/services/medicare/reciprocal-health-care-agreements/visitors-australia/medical-care-visitors-australia/visiting-from-slovenia)
Sweden (https://www.humanservices.gov.au/individuals/services/medicare/reciprocal-health-care-agreements/visitors-australia/medical-care-visitors-australia/visiting-from-sweden)
United Kingdom (https://www.humanservices.gov.au/individuals/services/medicare/reciprocal-health-care-agreements/visitors-australia/medical-care-visitors-australia/visiting-from-united-kingdom)

I don't see the States on there, which is where the OP is from.

So I showed you mine, now show me yours :E

(Happy to be corrected, but the above has been my experience)

Bend alot
3rd Dec 2018, 22:10
Firstly the 457 visa system has been scrapped, so it is a little hard to apply for one (some applications are still in the pipeline).

Secondly the reciprocal health agreement we have with those countries is not Medicare and there are limitations on what is provided.

Thirdly, and the important bit is the requirement to be eligible is to have applied for a Permanent Visa - the exception is Parent Visas.

There is no restriction on countries, you simply go to Medicare with receipt of payment for a PR visa, your Medicare application form and the current visa you have to be legally in Australia such as a Visitor Visa or a Bridging Visa E. A short time later they will give you your Medicare Number and tell you your "Blue Interim Card" will turn up in the mail in around 2 weeks, you stay on the "blue card" until PR is granted often a few years later. There is no difference in what is provided between the Blue and Green and I see Ukraine is not on that list!




https://www.humanservices.gov.au/individuals/services/medicare/medicare-card/eligibility/who-can-get-it

https://www.seekvisa.com.au/visas-eligible-for-medicare/

This one also covers Temp visas and a statement of a time limit for Reciprocal Health cover.

https://www.immiaustralia.com.au/blogs/are-you-eligible-for-medicare/

I can also direct you to a forum where many had/have Medicare on temporary residence visas.

Bend alot
3rd Dec 2018, 22:54
Throw a dart at a map of the USA and do a comparison of the GA facilities, businesses and activities in whatever happens to be the nearest city - forget capitals.


I threw the Google Maps pin - ended up in Mexico first, so had another throw.

St. Paul Downtown Holman Field

2014 was 66,475 aircraft operations 74% being GA

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Paul_Downtown_Airport

Oriana
4th Dec 2018, 02:02
One thing this joint ain't, is, Socialist. It's still run by a bunch of clowns like a [email protected] penal colony. With probably less privacy laws than the US.

We might even let you become an Austronaut!!

Your colleagues will be friendly to you. It's casually racist place, even for white people, worse if you are 'of middle eastern appearance', asian or a native. You won't get shot by police during a routine traffic stop.

PS Live your life the way you want. If you want to have a go, come over and try it. Looking through a different set of lenses can make this place what you like. Especially if the girl is worth it. For the rest of us here, familiarity breeds contempt. You can always go back to the US if it goes bad. Plan on AUD$10,000 to apply for permanent residency.

PSS If you get here, and you end up flying, whatever you do, do not bust a CTA step.:hmm:

Bend alot
4th Dec 2018, 03:16
Oriana - these guys say $6,000 - $8,000 using a RMA, I don't know them but seems close to the mark.

https://migrateoz.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=45

$10,000 is more like an Australian citizen bringing in his foreign partner in on a Partner Visa without using an RMA, more like $15,000 if you use an RMA.

With the American taxation system - "can always go back" phrase rolls off the tongue a bit fast!

Seagull201
4th Dec 2018, 03:33
I actually know a fair bit about Australian visas.

Fact - you do not need permanent residency to access Medicare.

Fact - The reduction of issued visas recently is due to the reduction in "Skilled Worker" applicants. The planning level remained the same as other years (actually slightly increased) just not enough applied.

Fact - if you are serious in moving to Australia you need to consult with a Registered Migration Agent. I know of around 6 that I would happily recommend as very good.

Fact - There are far better places to live than Sydney. But for the unlucky, many companies have a "Sydney Allowance" that assist a bit.

Quote: Fact - you do not need permanent residency to access Medicare.

I know a person that had Australian citizenship and passport ( due inheritance from their parents), the person visited OZ for the first time in their life.

Medicare told the person, they cannot be covered by Medicare, until, they have been in the country for a continuous 6 month period.
Although the person had AU citizenship, it didn't help in that instance.
The person needed personal health or travel insurance during their 6 month stay.

Bend alot
4th Dec 2018, 04:13
Quote: Fact - you do not need permanent residency to access Medicare.

I know a person that had Australian citizenship and passport ( due inheritance from their parents), the person visited OZ for the first time in their life.

Medicare told the person, they cannot be covered by Medicare, until, they have been in the country for a continuous 6 month period.
Although the person had AU citizenship, it didn't help in that instance.
The person needed personal health or travel insurance during their 6 month stay.

I know of dozens that have been told they are not eligible for Medicare, speaking to the supervisor or going to another branch often rectifies the problem of the poor staff training in some Medicare offices other offices are excellent. We were done and dusted in less than 10 mins inc wait time.

I asked a very simple question in a very basic way via email to the concerned department (at the time) in relation to eligibility of Medicare on a certain Temporary Visa - it took 3 replies to get the simple basic answer of yes they will be eligible.

A good chance that that Medicare person that told the person you know now works at CAsA or they will soon be poached now you let the cat out!

P.S. It is citizenship by descent, and I will warn 2 of my 3 kids about that trap.

morno
4th Dec 2018, 07:04
Hell, those of us who have been overseas for more than 5 years are no longer eligible for Medicare!

Bend alot
4th Dec 2018, 07:18
Actually Morno - that is correct you need to be onshore to get Medicare they don't cover overseas doctors or hospitals.

morno
4th Dec 2018, 13:10
Actually Morno - that is correct you need to be onshore to get Medicare they don't cover overseas doctors or hospitals.

What I mean Bend Alot, is that even as a citizen born in the country, once we’ve been overseas for 5 years as a non-tax resident, then even when we come back to Australia, we’re not eligible for Medicare until we become tax residents again.

morno

Bend alot
4th Dec 2018, 22:48
It has been some years for me morno, but I do not recall having to do anything to become a resident for tax purposes again.

Ticking the box on the incoming passenger card that you intend to live in Australia for the next 12 months, may make lodging of a tax return a requirement - but I don't know.

I think you just decide to become a resident again, and that instantly makes you eligible for Medicare.

Oriana
5th Dec 2018, 02:40
BENDALOT: One has to factor in a bunch of medical examinations etc etc as well. This figure is a quote from a neighbour of mine.

Bend alot
5th Dec 2018, 03:53
BENDALOT: One has to factor in a bunch of medical examinations etc etc as well. This figure is a quote from a neighbour of mine.
Yep medical worked out to $1,000 USD for the missus and 2 kids. Ranges from around $150 AUD - 480 Euro for a single adult.
our docs required translations @ $1,000 AUD wont need any from the USA.

Just saying that is a High Quote and will cover more than the application for PR. It would at my guess cover the application fee, medicals, character certificates (police clearances), skills assessments, migration agents fees and airfares.

$10,000 is what is banded around for a total Partner Visa cost excluding airfares - Skilled migration is far cheaper, it is also easier and faster.

Happy to give you a few names of excellent Registered Migration Agents for your neighbour to get second quotes. FYI the RMA's need to supply their registration numbers - the first 2 digits are the year they first became registered.

fudwinkel
5th Dec 2018, 06:50
Doesn't look like anyone mentioned the costs of ticking all the CASA boxes for licensing. I don't know the latest on conversions but getting those ATP subjects done and the instrument rating is expensive and time consuming. Anyone want to chime in on how overseas pilots get that completed without going broke or what assistance, if any, is offered by any operators in Oz.

Bend alot
5th Dec 2018, 07:05
Doesn't look like anyone mentioned the costs of ticking all the CASA boxes for licensing. I don't know the latest on conversions but getting those ATP subjects done and the instrument rating is expensive and time consuming. Anyone want to chime in on how overseas pilots get that completed without going broke or what assistance, if any, is offered by any operators in Oz.
Hi Mate,

That all depends entirely on the visa type and then the contract you sign - but first is the visa type.

Some visas (with exceptions) require every cost to be paid by the employer and they can not get any part of that back ever (no bonds).

This is where it get complicated and you need the services of a good RMA - this to check the visas you can apply for cost around $230-$250 AUD (one is online) outlining conditions. If you have a contract then I expect the cost to give you the full details with the above cost to be around $500 for a good RMA.

Generally the company get RMA agencies to do visa applications - you best bet is to pay the $500 and have your RMA check it is in your favour, not the employers.

fudwinkel
5th Dec 2018, 09:13
Bend
So it looks like the best bet is to ensure you have an employer lined up to assist with the visa and it will assist with all conversion costs and exams. If you don't need a visa you will probably be on your own to get everything done to be employable.

Looks like a lot of the minimums are coming down eg Qantas and Rex, but regardless of your experience you still need the CASA instrument rating and ATP subjects completed. Most foreign pilots don't appreciate what is involved.

I often have FAA qualified pilots asking me about working in Oz because they hear the stories on the alleged pilot shortage but when I explain they will need to do ATP exams that are more comparable to JAA than FAA and the potential costs of the MECIR their interest fades a lot. I don't think anyone has nominated any airlines that will sponsor pilots.

Bend alot
5th Dec 2018, 10:09
Bend
So it looks like the best bet is to ensure you have an employer lined up to assist with the visa and it will assist with all conversion costs and exams. If you don't need a visa you will probably be on your own to get everything done to be employable.

Looks like a lot of the minimums are coming down eg Qantas and Rex, but regardless of your experience you still need the CASA instrument rating and ATP subjects completed. Most foreign pilots don't appreciate what is involved.

I often have FAA qualified pilots asking me about working in Oz because they hear the stories on the alleged pilot shortage but when I explain they will need to do ATP exams that are more comparable to JAA than FAA and the potential costs of the MECIR their interest fades a lot. I don't think anyone has nominated any airlines that will sponsor pilots.
No your best "bet" is a good RMA.

pilotchute
5th Dec 2018, 10:10
Fundwinkel you are giving flawed advice. If you have a foreign ATPL (or ATP) you don't have to complete all 7 ATPL exams. You only need to do IREX and,

The ATPL Human Factors exam (AHUF) and
The ATPL overseas conversion exam (either AOSA or AOSH).

josephfeatherweight
5th Dec 2018, 11:37
And ATPL Airlaw?

B772
5th Dec 2018, 11:52
Bend alot. You are correct about Medicare. If you get a knock back from a Medicare office just go to a different one and leave with a temporary card ( actually a piece of thermal paper )

atr-drivr
5th Dec 2018, 11:58
I’ve been to Australia many times over the years and have found Australian living standards far superior to American ones.

Wages might not be as good for pilots as they are in the US, but you guys have a better healthcare system, better education system, much more liveable cities, no mass shootings, better worker protections.

I’d like to raise a family and Australia is a much better place than America to raise kids.


How about moving out of your socialist state of CA first, then re-evaluate. If you think that Australia is “much better” then just GTFO....

oicur12.again
5th Dec 2018, 17:35
Lead Balloon,

“banished to the grass.”
“panoramic view”
“One AVGAS bowser”
“One GA maintenance organization”
“Sleepy hollow G airspace”

Not really sure these things constitute third world. More likely simply responding to the small demand for GA that exists in CB

However I was more referring to the airline industry as the OP stated that was his/her intended destination.

“How about moving out of your socialist state of CA first, then re-evaluate. If you think that Australia is “much better”then just GTFO....”

You’re a real thinker aren’t you.

Lead Balloon
5th Dec 2018, 19:11
More likely simply responding to the small demand for GA that exists in CB.You’ve mixed up cause and effect.

The small demand for GA that exists in CB is caused by a combination of the delivery of a monopoly public airport into the hands of a private individual who’s charged GA tenants and users to their knees, CASA over-regulation and ASIC nonsense.

But let’s talk about how the ‘airline industry’ is treated at CB. Don’t divert there without having a briefcase full of cash or a credit card with a high limit. You’ll be blocked from pushing back until you’ve paid the ‘special’ charges for having had the temerity to divert there. There’s a description of the kinds of places in which these kinds of things happen in aviation: Third world.

At least we can all get some consolation from the fact that we’re all contributing to the owner’s continuing ascent of the Rich List.

Bend alot
5th Dec 2018, 19:40
Bend alot. You are correct about Medicare. If you get a knock back from a Medicare office just go to a different one and leave with a temporary card ( actually a piece of thermal paper )
I actually forgot - you also need to take in your foreign passport too. Yes thermal paper.

fudwinkel
6th Dec 2018, 11:09
Pilotchute/featherweight
I was aware there were concession for the exams for ATP conversions, I did think that Airlaw was the one you had to do. However I understand Qantas group, and perhaps others, still require all exams to be completed. I did FAA CPL to CASA CPL years ago and from memory it was only Air law exam for that.

That still leaves you with the instrument rating which can be challenging for anyone who hasn't flown in Australia, hasn't flown a duchess (or whatever) for who knows how long and who may never have flown NDB approaches. That is of course unless you can find an employer willing to assist with all that.

A lot of discussion here about Medicare and cost of living etc but for the average non Australian pilot I would think the time, expense and effort to convert from FAA certificates to CASA would be the thing to look at after figuring out the visa.

Bend alot
6th Dec 2018, 11:22
A lot of discussion here about Medicare and cost of living etc but for the average non Australian pilot I would think the time, expense and effort to convert from FAA certificates to CASA would be the thing to look at after figuring out the visa.

But I clearly said the visa will determine cost (to you) and that varies from everything to nothing then secondary will be the contract you sign.

So step 1 is what visa can/do you qualify for - after that effort and expense can be worked out.