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RedhillPhil
20th Nov 2018, 18:54
I wonder what the collective could offer on this. My sister was born in a military hospital in Nicosia in 1954 whilst Pa was stationed there as he was in the R.A.F. Her birth certificate was signed by a Flight Lieutenant Sharp. Her nationality is shown not as British as might be thought, but English. Would that be a simple error or might be have been a proto English separatist?

Gertrude the Wombat
20th Nov 2018, 19:03
Prob'ly means May will throw her out as a cross between a Windrusher and a queue-jumper. After all, she can always sort out any administrative errors remotely after she's been deported.

RedhillPhil
20th Nov 2018, 22:27
That's what I told her - much to her chagrin.

India Four Two
20th Nov 2018, 23:38
A bluntie named Sharp! :)

Krystal n chips
21st Nov 2018, 07:14
The time to become really concerned about nationality is when......Yorkshire....appears in the options.

ian16th
21st Nov 2018, 09:11
The time to become really concerned about nationality is when......Yorkshire....appears in the options.

Why be worried?

We have 5 grounds that we could host test matches at.

Fareastdriver
21st Nov 2018, 09:49
My sister was born in a military hospital in Nicosia in 1954 whilst Pa was stationed there as he was in the R.A.F.

My daughter was born in Singapore in a British military hospital. She had both a Singapore birth certificate and a British one and there has been no problem with passports etc.

She found out, too late, that up to the age of eighteen she could have applied for Singapore citizenship as well which might have, or not have been useful.

Null Orifice
21st Nov 2018, 14:19
My daughter was born in Singapore in a British military hospital. She had both a Singapore birth certificate and a British one and there has been no problem with passports etc.

She found out, too late, that up to the age of eighteen she could have applied for Singapore citizenship as well which might have, or not have been useful.

Same situation for my daughter - the down side to the Singapore citizenship was that she would have become liable for military service under the rules pertaining at that time (early 70s).

G0ULI
21st Nov 2018, 15:31
At that time there was a distinction over various classes of British citizenship. There still is. Putting "English" on the birth certificate meant that the child would be able to claim full citizenship and residency rights in the UK at any time in the future.

chevvron
22nd Nov 2018, 11:13
Bloke I know was born in India pre 1947 of Irish parents who were working for the UK government. On return to the UK, he did National Service in the RAF including overseas postings. In the late '60s, still living in the UK as he had been since India, he applied for a British passport and was refused on the grounds HMPO decided his nationality was Irish, not Brtish.

Blacksheep
22nd Nov 2018, 13:33
The same happened to Spike Milligan. He was born during his Irish father's military service on the NW Frontier. When he applied for a passport in later years he was told he was either Pakistani or Irish or possibly both - but was not eligible for a British passport. One reason why he emigrated to Australia.

Octane
22nd Nov 2018, 14:22
Nationality of the Father was the key (Grandfather would do I think, I believe things have changed). i.e. I was born in NZ to an English Father, Kiwi Mum. I have a full British passport (and a NZ one) that records the birth place as Wellington, NZ.

ian16th
22nd Nov 2018, 16:51
Nationality of the Father was the key (Grandfather would do I think, I believe things have changed). i.e. I was born in NZ to an English Father, Kiwi Mum. I have a full British passport (and a NZ one) that records the birth place as Wellington, NZ.

Not quite as 'full' as one that says born within the UK. It works for getting in and out of the UK, but I am aware of people having problems getting USA Visa's because they were born in the RAF Akrotiri Hospital.

I also am aware of a guy who had an Irish father, born in Ireland before partition. He opted to be 'British' and signed a document at the time.
He travelled a lot and married. While resident in Argentina, my mate was born there.
My mate joined the RAF and married while serving. His wife had 2 children, one born in Malta and one in Germany.
After his service, c1971, my mate decided to emigrate to Oz.

The Oz authorities asked to see a copy of the document his father had signed in 1922.

Somerset House had a copy!

Octane
23rd Nov 2018, 05:46
Not quite as 'full' as one that says born within the UK. It works for getting in and out of the UK, but I am aware of people having problems getting USA Visa's because they were born in the RAF Akrotiri Hospital.

I also am aware of a guy who had an Irish father, born in Ireland before partition. He opted to be 'British' and signed a document at the time.
He travelled a lot and married. While resident in Argentina, my mate was born there.
My mate joined the RAF and married while serving. His wife had 2 children, one born in Malta and one in Germany.
After his service, c1971, my mate decided to emigrate to Oz.

The Oz authorities asked to see a copy of the document his father had signed in 1922.

Somerset House had a copy!
In my case incorrect. My passport states "BRITISH CITIZEN" code GBR. i.e. bog standard British citizenship...

Tinstaafl
23rd Nov 2018, 06:39
I'm up to four citizenships now. A couple through naturalisation, one through birth, and one through ancestry. Only have three passports, so I should pull my finger out and get the fourth. My son has four as well.

Gertrude the Wombat
23rd Nov 2018, 11:02
I should pull my finger out and get the fourth
If the fourth is the one via ancestry and is Irish (as so many such are), and none of the other three is an EU27 nationality, then yes, you probably should.

ian16th
23rd Nov 2018, 12:20
In my case incorrect. My passport states "BRITISH CITIZEN" code GBR. i.e. bog standard British citizenship...As I said, this gets you into and out of the UK.

But your 'Place of Birth' is not the UK.
This can be problematic if you apply for a visa to enter some countries. In particular the USA.
I am aware of a person who was born at that RAF Hospital Akrotiri who had this problem.

Imagegear
23rd Nov 2018, 12:31
As I said, this gets you into and out of the UK.

But your 'Place of Birth' is not the UK.
This can be problematic if you apply for a visa to enter some countries. In particular the USA.
I am aware of a person who was born at that RAF Hospital Akrotiri who had this problem.

Yes,and you will find that if you have children, they have no entitlement to citizenship or residence.
If they are born in the UK all well and good but your "one time only" entitlement is not inherited, so they will not be able to claim the right if born in another country.

IG

IG

racedo
23rd Nov 2018, 12:40
If the fourth is the one via ancestry and is Irish (as so many such are), and none of the other three is an EU27 nationality, then yes, you probably should.

Aware of quite a few friends who arch Brexiteers who when vote went through all of a sudden remembered they had Irish ancestors so applied for passports there. Calling them full blown hypocrites didn't produce a good response but we friends a long time so being honest is part of that.

.

Gertrude the Wombat
23rd Nov 2018, 13:08
In some cases #brexiteer parents do have to do parts of the paperwork dance in order for their Remainer (or Rejoiner if they're not yet born) children to qualify for Irish passports. But I agree that, whilst they should do the foreign birth registration thing to preserve the rights of their children, it would be hypocritical in the extreme to go the rest of the way and apply for and use the passports.

No parent, however #brexiteer, should decide that their descendants should also be #brexiteers until the end of time, and deny them Irish citizenship by deliberately not bothering with a few hundred quid's worth of paperwork.

Tinstaafl
4th Dec 2018, 15:22
My fourth is indeed Irish citizenship. And the reason for getting that passport is to retain EU access. Same for my son. When he's old enough and wants to travel it will give him a lot options.

wiggy
4th Dec 2018, 15:50
In some cases #brexiteer parents do have to do parts of the paperwork dance in order for their Remainer (or Rejoiner if they're not yet born) children to qualify for Irish passports. But I agree that, whilst they should do the foreign birth registration thing to preserve the rights of their children, it would be hypocritical in the extreme to go the rest of the way and apply for and use the passports.

No parent, however #brexiteer, should decide that their descendants should also be #brexiteers until the end of time, and deny them Irish citizenship by deliberately not bothering with a few hundred quid's worth of paperwork.

I understand what you are saying but TBH I think you are being very forgiving..those brexiteers parents have made life very difficult for many of us who don't have the luxury of an Irish "connection" but still need to ensure our children have continued FOM/right to work/study within the EU27 post Brexit.

Those particular #brexiters have colluded in driving the ship onto the rocks whilst making darned sure their own kids have a place in a lifeboat....

As you can guess it is something that makes me quite grumpy...I'm really not sure hypocrite is a strong enough word.

radar101
4th Dec 2018, 17:45
Those particular #brexiters have colluded in driving the ship onto the rocks whilst making darned sure their own kids have a place in a lifeboat....


What, like Rees- Mogg:

"Prominent Brexiteer Jacob Rees-Mogg (https://www.independent.co.uk/topic/jacob-rees-mogg) has defended the move by a City firm that he helped to found to establish an investment fund in Ireland ahead of the UK leaving the European Union.

The Conservative MP faced questions when it emerged that Somerset Capital Management (SCM) had launched a new investment vehicle in Dublin amid concerns about being cut off from European investors."

Pah!

redsnail
4th Dec 2018, 22:39
I was born in Sydney, Australia. Thus I hold Australian citizenship. My father was born in Glasgow, Scotland. Thus I could and did get British citizenship. I hold a UK passport. It says Sydney as place of birth. I hold Russian and US visas. I haven't had any issues getting those visas inserted into my British passport.

wiggy
5th Dec 2018, 07:36
In the context of Brexit and U.K. vs. Irish passports Visa’s aren’t the issue (though it would be a step back in time) for many it is a h*** of a lot more complex than that.

It is things like the (potential) loss of the ability to simply pick up your U.K. passport and travel at very short notice across EU and EU27/U.K. Border for professional reasons (which by chance my eldest is doing today). There will no doubt be extra paperwork involved for any Brits hoping to stay in full time education in an EU 27 nation post 29th March (something which will effect my youngest,). As far as I know there has been no clarification how/if the Erasmus scheme will be available to U.K. passport holding students..

Now it is fair to say what will happen post 29th March has yet to be hammered out at the U.K. end but given that the ending of FOM is The thickest and reddest of TM’s red lines I’m not optimistic. As a result we and many others with skin in this game have for months now have been involved taking sometimes long winded, time consuming, expensive and tedious measures at a local level to protect our offspring from the consequences of this....storm.

That is why the idea that an #brexiter can contribute to causing this mess, then sidestep the consequences and perhaps even put themselves or family at an advantage by applying for an Irish passport is a bit tough to take..to put it politely.

racedo
5th Dec 2018, 09:58
My fourth is indeed Irish citizenship. And the reason for getting that passport is to retain EU access. Same for my son. When he's old enough and wants to travel it will give him a lot options.

If he has kids then registering them as a Foreign Birth in Irish Embassy will ensure they can have Irish passports as well.

racedo
5th Dec 2018, 10:20
I understand what you are saying but TBH I think you are being very forgiving..those brexiteers parents have made life very difficult for many of us who don't have the luxury of an Irish "connection" but still need to ensure our children have continued FOM/right to work/study within the EU27 post Brexit.

Those particular #brexiters have colluded in driving the ship onto the rocks whilst making darned sure their own kids have a place in a lifeboat....

As you can guess it is something that makes me quite grumpy...I'm really not sure hypocrite is a strong enough word.

Not surprised. Aas all the ones I talked about have a parent born in Ireland so their kids are ok. But even now they still cling to the idea of Brexit, even when I highlight for quite a few how the businesses they work for. moved jobs into EU with some losing their job. Nobody can yet tell me of benefit of Brexit among those who voted for it.

funfly
5th Dec 2018, 23:00
I have a British EU passport which expires next year. Do you think I could apply for an EU passport from Brussels?

er340790
6th Dec 2018, 08:35
I started out as a standard GBR.

Married a Canadian / Italian and became a certified Moose too.

Post Brexit, applied to become a certified Wop.

Our kids are all 3 and were born in NL, so are certified Cloggies = quad nationality.

These days, I feel like a Card Conjurer at Immigration: "Pick a Passport! Any Passport!"