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ATNotts
13th Nov 2018, 08:33
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-46179175

I'd never heard of these, perhaps because I avoid eating in these chain operated pub restaurants but it begs the question who buys these things, sometimes containing more than 1300 kcal or 65% of our recommended daily calorie consumption?

Parents buying them for their kids are irresponsible beyond belief, and adults buying them clearly have no intention of making any attempt to look after themselves, probably just expecting the the NHS (or in other countries their health insurance) to pick up the tab for the consequences.

Clearly there is a market for them, these big businesses aren't offering them because they don't sell, or have to be sold at a loss.

If we as a society are more than comfortable to ban tobacco advertising, and to ban the sale of tobacco and alcohol to or on behalf of minors as well as tax them to the hilt in the name of public health, why is the government nor prepared to do similar with these beverages? Is the food lobby just too strong?

I'm not generally in favour of the nanny state, but when the consequences of consuming these things and their like is hitting all of us in our pockets through the health costs of looking after people suffering the consequences of their excesses / vices I do believe that taxation / legislation has a role to play - not the usual toothless "codes of conduct" that industry come up with.

G-CPTN
13th Nov 2018, 09:02
Weren't we lead to believe (in the 1950s) that nutrition would be delivered in the form of 'shakes' - how else would space travellers feed themselves?

ATNotts
13th Nov 2018, 09:07
Weren't we lead to believe (in the 1950s) that nutrition would be delivered in the form of 'shakes' - how else would space travellers feed themselves?

I'm not quite old enough to remember that!!

But don't think they were suggesting milkshakes stuffed with sugar, chocolate and the like. More vegetables and proteins - a balanced diet in liquid, not a sugar / fat fest.

bnt
13th Nov 2018, 10:07
The BBC is just using the name of one of the worst offenders as representing a class. But apart from that, "freakshakes" aren't actually a thing ...

ATNotts
13th Nov 2018, 10:20
The BBC is just using the name of one of the worst offenders as representing a class. But apart from that, "freakshakes" aren't actually a thing ...

That's fine, and probably typical of lazy journalism, but if those really grotesque examples do exist, then perhaps they ought to be taxed out of existence. You only have to walk down any high street to see far too many very obese people who haven't got that way through eating a balanced meat and veg diet, and they are / will be costing the rest of us bucket loads of money as they get older.

If they were paying for their own health care, then fair enough - do what you like, it's your life, your health, and your funeral. But in UK it isn't, all of us pay for other's excesses.

Pontius Navigator
13th Nov 2018, 10:32
I can say a sugar tax works. Was out with grandson (13) who went and bought a Coke. He chose the non-sugar version as it was 20p cheaper. When it comes to his money he knows how to save.

gemma10
13th Nov 2018, 13:44
A lot of these so called puddings are indeed for sharing.

racedo
13th Nov 2018, 16:55
I can say a sugar tax works. Was out with grandson (13) who went and bought a Coke. He chose the non-sugar version as it was 20p cheaper. When it comes to his money he knows how to save.

If you go into a pub now the majority do not have "Full fat" drinks on Post mix dispenser, you have to have it from bottle or can............... this is more expensive. Even in McD's the option is page 2 on the auto ordering facility.

SARF
13th Nov 2018, 17:11
Is a non sugar sweet drink good for you? I doubt it ..
if you fancy 1300 calories of crap after a week of exercise or hard work or just because you fancy it, why should you have to pay even more tax because some porker can’t keep a lid on it or say no to their brats..
Just sell them to people who can fit through a certain size gap for their height .. like hand luggage ��
personally I prefer my 1300 calories in booze format .. also taxed to fk

eal401
14th Nov 2018, 13:06
perhaps they ought to be taxed out of existence.

No they shouldn't. You are not obliged to buy or consume them.

Anyone who thinks these are to be consumed on a daily or regular basis is a moron of the highest measurable standard. And guess what, I have never had one, nor has anyone in my family.

ATNotts
14th Nov 2018, 13:25
No they shouldn't. You are not obliged to buy or consume them.

Anyone who thinks these are to be consumed on a daily or regular basis is a moron of the highest measurable standard. And guess what, I have never had one, nor has anyone in my family.

Indeed not, and I imagine that few if anyone on this forum has either. HOWEVER if you live and pay taxes in the UK then you are paying for the consequences of those morons that do, since our health service if paid for by all of us, and delivered free at the point of delivery.

Those of us to drink alcohol and smoke pay tax in the form of excise duties to at least in part pay for the costs that we incur through our use of these substances; why should the customers of these grotesquely unhealthy products not also pay a little more for their "sins"?

fitliker
14th Nov 2018, 15:01
Smoking and Drinking should be made compulsory upon retirement . It will reduce the long retirements that modern medicine has gifted the world with .
Life expectancy has increased to the point where by the time I retire there will be nothing left in the kitty .
The money not paid out to smokers and drinkers in pensions saves more, than their usually short stays in the National Hospice System costs .
Everything in moderation ,including moderation is the secret to a happy life :)

evansb
14th Nov 2018, 19:14
Indeed. Consume 3 pints of beer and a package of crisps and you've taken in 1,000 calories.

Pedant Patrol: The Right Way to Use "Begs the Question". "Begs the question" is actually a term that comes from logic, and it's used to indicate that someone has made a conclusion based on a premise that lacks support.

chuks
15th Nov 2018, 03:15
We were at the cafe by the art museum in Emden, Germany to have a snack after visiting a traveling art exhibit to do with all things America. There was this "American milkshake" on the menu, so I ordered one.

A classical American milkshake, sometimes called a frappé, is made with full milk, flavored syrup, and ice cream. It's sugary, but within limits. In Germany a milkshake is pathetic: cold milk and syrup, mixed, a literal milkshake, so that I was looking forward to the real thing, a part of my culinary patrimony.

What arrived was grotesque: all of that which makes up an American milkshake, plus heaped whipped cream drizzled with caramel syrup and studded with Gummi Bears! It suggested that someone had been challenged to fit as many calories as possible into one large glass, when this was the solution.

If you are young and hyper-active you might be able to get away with consuming such things, but not when you are some old fart with the metabolism of a giant tortoise. If this is really American, when it might be, then it's easy to understand why we have about 30% of our populace that is obese, included in about 75% that is overweight. Anyway, I had ordered the damned thing so that I finished it, but it left me feeling like a python that had just snacked on an American tourist.

eal401
15th Nov 2018, 08:26
Those of us to drink alcohol and smoke pay tax in the form of excise duties to at least in part pay for the costs that we incur through our use of these substances; why should the customers of these grotesquely unhealthy products not also pay a little more for their "sins"?

OK. What taxes will we apply to physical sports with a risk of injury - football, rugby, ice skating, hockey, boxing etc.? What taxes will we apply to cycling to cover for people injured when they fall off?

Or perhaps we can teach people to take responsibility for themselves? Whoa, wait - I am in the realms of stupidity now suggesting that.

ATNotts
15th Nov 2018, 08:54
OK. What taxes will we apply to physical sports with a risk of injury - football, rugby, ice skating, hockey, boxing etc.? What taxes will we apply to cycling to cover for people injured when they fall off?

Or perhaps we can teach people to take responsibility for themselves? Whoa, wait - I am in the realms of stupidity now suggesting that.

Personally, I would advocate that people taking part in "dangerous activities" should have insurance to cover them for rescue / recovery and medical costs. I appreciate it is very subjective as to what is and what isn't a "dangerous activity" but lets face it, climbing, motor sport, skiing for example are all things that you don't need to do in every day life, and therefore could fairly controversially be slotted into the dangerous category.

Top and bottom is that we have to do something to curb the every ballooning demands on the NHS - growing old is something none of us can avoid, since euthanasia is not a legal option in UK, and this alone will put more and more pressure on the service - and something has to change.

TheFiddler
15th Nov 2018, 12:26
But apart from that, "freakshakes" aren't actually a thing ...

They most certainly are a thing. This is just one of the many specialist cafes selling them in Manchester...

I can't post Url's but manually visit here: www.blackmilkcereal.com/menu/

treadigraph
15th Nov 2018, 16:00
Christ, I just looked at those Mr Fiddler - who on earth would want to eat any of that sh... rubbish? Deep fried Mars Bars suddenly sound like an essential part of a weight loss programme...

tdracer
15th Nov 2018, 21:34
If this is really American, when it might be, then it's easy to understand why we have about 30% of our populace that is obese, included in about 75% that is overweight.
Is it American? Well, probably, since you can find such creations in America. But you have to remember the USA is quite large, with over 300 million people, and there is massive variety.
For what it's worth, I very seldom get a milk shake as I don't want or need the calories, but the wife sometimes gets one (she doesn't need the calories either, but I'm not brave enough to mention that to her :sad:). In sit-down restaurants, it's rather common for a milk shake to be served with a 'garnish' of whipped cream - although it's unlikely to be real whipped cream - more likely that stuff that comes in an aerosol can. Fast food places generally skip the garnish. I've never seen the rest of the stuff you mention on a milk shake.

chuks
16th Nov 2018, 07:09
That thing with the Gummi Bears came from Germany, so that I am not sure either if it's all that common in the States. (I never heard of putting Gummi Bears on a milkshake before, but who knows?)

Germany is not far behind the States when it comes to obesity, come to that. The traditional German diet includes a lot of gut-busters, the kind of food you needed to burn as fuel when you were doing hard manual labor, except that nowadays that sort of labor is not usually done.

flyingfemme
16th Nov 2018, 10:13
These "things" are not drinks - they are desserts. I doubt most people have them every day; they are a treat. I trust we are still allowed treats? Would you ban boxes of chocolates on the grounds that they are too big? How about those "yard of chocolate" bars? I have seen doughnuts gussied up in the same fashion - they are meant to be a feast for the senses and you look at them first.
Us oldies were taught to clean our plates or feel bad about the waste. I don't think the younger generation feel much shame about leaving a portion of their meal; after all, they have paid for it all.
It seems the norm to share desserts anyway in restaurants - I was having lunch yesterday and ordered dessert (not usual for me) and the waitress brought us two sets of cutlery as a matter of course. It wasn't even a freakishly big portion - M. Blanc has portion control down to an art!
What is available isn't the problem; the problem is people who have no self control and/or are badly informed. The rich have many opportunities to overeat and yet many of them are still sylph-like.

chuks
16th Nov 2018, 11:59
In Morocco you may be presented with a huge dish heaped with couscous, lamb, and stewed veg, when the whole point is not to be able to eat it all! I nearly capsized myself until someone explained the rules to me, just the opposite of "be a good guest and eat it all, every bit."