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Prawn2king4
12th Nov 2018, 03:50
I was recently at a cinema in Beijing and at the end of the film the auditorium, still dark, was half illuminated by light from the audience’s mobiles as almost all were simultaneously activated, and I thought, as heads scanned their screens, how vaguely threatening was this scene … almost as if these, mainly young, people were under the influence of some unseen force. My companion smiled as I voiced these thoughts, adding that it wouldn’t be long before unseen chips in these mobiles would slowly taking control of their owners, or even worse, these chips could be embedded in their bodies.

And now, a few days later I see it’s actually bloody happening! And in UK of all places (what price those critics on here sounding off about China’s face recognition policy)!

“Britain’s biggest employer organisation and main trade union body have sounded the alarm over the prospect of British companies implanting staff with microchips to improve security.

UK firm BioTeq, which offers the implants to businesses and individuals, has already fitted 150 implants in the UK.”

Maybe I should update my comment “vaguely threatening”.

Bob Viking
12th Nov 2018, 05:16
Have you seen the movie ‘Kingsman: The Secret Service’?

I’m not here to recommend it as a film (I very much enjoyed it but it may not be everyone’s cup of tea) but if you have seen it the plot will resonate with your thoughts in this thread.

Since we have young children I make a point of not taking my phone out when we go out as a family. My wife has hers for photos (we want to buy a small camera to obviate this need) but doesn’t check it for other reasons.

I know its a brave new world and we should not judge the changing times too harshly but I hate the sight of groups of people glued to their phones when they could just be chatting. I mean really, are the friends on the end of the phone more important than the friends sat in front of you?!

I just hope I can raise my kids to not care about social media. Slim chance perhaps.

BV

sitigeltfel
12th Nov 2018, 06:21
I remember a BBC radio play from decades ago and the plot revolved around a future society where everyone had an explosive implant in their brain linked to a central government control centre.
To stay alive people had to accrue credits through work or wealth and if you failed to keep up your credits a signal was sent out that triggered the explosive.
The central character was running low on credits and had sourced some on the black market but was rapidly running out of time as the gangsters closed in.
Can't remember how it ended though! :confused:

Chesty Morgan
12th Nov 2018, 06:47
I know its a brave new world and we should not judge the changing times too harshly but I hate the sight of groups of people glued to their phones when they could just be chatting. I mean really, are the friends on the end of the phone more important than the friends sat in front of you?!

They probably are the friends on the end of the phone. So they are chatting. You know just not in that old fangled way of speaking out loud. Like. Init.

double_barrel
12th Nov 2018, 07:01
It's probably worse than you think. The big providers - Google, Facebook, instagram etc etc are constantly conducting experiments on the human population that would not be permitted if a psychologist requested ethical permission. But is not illegal because they are not described by FB as experiments. But seriously, that is quite literally what they are doing. They use analytics to categorise people in a bunch of different ways, then expose them to different types of messages, then examine the effect on their behavioral metrics. eg find people with incipient racist tendencies, expose them to stories, messages, signals that encourage or reduce such tendencies, reclassify them on the basis of their subsequent postings, see which messages had the biggest effects. And if you are a politician and you want someone's vote, you micro target to individual touch-points - simple example, identify gun users and send them messages about how candidate A will protect their rights to arm bears. Or indeed how candidate B threatens their rights - there is a simple experiment in its own right - ask which is most effective.

FB would deny that is experimenting. It's true that marketers have been doing fundamentally the same for decades, but with nothing like the same scale, reach and power.

SpringHeeledJack
12th Nov 2018, 07:02
The dystopian future of Huxley et al is coming, we're on the path already. Perhaps in the not too distant future we'll be experiencing trans-humanism, rather than just in sci-fi tomes. Chapeau to Mr Viking for his efforts, sadly King Canute found out the hard way.

Krystal n chips
12th Nov 2018, 07:18
My preference has always been for chips covered in salt n vinegar, or mayo, or other sauces rather than embedded under my skin....

However, it does beg a few more than vague concerns should this practice suddenly start to become widespread.......at which point, m'learned friends will be queuing up regarding Employment law and Human rights....so it may take a while to become a standard "Ts and C's " practice .....along with being chipped at birth which is probably already under consideration by some " alt. right thunk tank " somewhere anyway, .

Of course, it should, hopefully follow those other great innovations associated with the "dot com " world.......straight into the recycling bin.

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/nov/11/alarm-over-talks-to-implant-uk-employees-with-microchips

There again, as the UK is one of the most surveillance obsessed societies......" only for public protection " in the world, we'll probably be the first to embrace this wonderful new addition for breaching our privacy.

denachtenmai
12th Nov 2018, 09:27
[QUOTEOf course, it should, hopefully follow those other great innovations associated with the "dot com " world.......straight into the recycling bin.[/QUOTE]
And that is exactly where this is going.:E
https://www.theguardian.com/technolo...ith-microchips (https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/nov/11/alarm-over-talks-to-implant-uk-employees-with-microchips)

cattletruck
12th Nov 2018, 10:37
Fear not, these human robots are here to help you, and all they want in exchange is a means to renew their monthly mobile phone plan.
Generation Zombie are obsessed with mundane popularism on instruments that are meaningless which makes it easier to avoid them or take them for a ride - take your pick.

Pontius Navigator
12th Nov 2018, 11:35
They probably are the friends on the end of the phone. So they are chatting. You know just not in that old fangled way of speaking out loud. Like. Init.
At a big band entertainment a mother and daughter spent much time texting each other.

flash8
12th Nov 2018, 20:38
I was recently at a cinema in Beijing and at the end of the film the auditorium, still dark, was half illuminated by light from the audience’s mobiles as almost all were simultaneously activated, and I thought, as heads scanned their screens, how vaguely threatening was this scene … almost as if these, mainly young, people were under the influence of some unseen force.
My mate owns and runs a chain of Guest houses in the UK, plenty of Chinese visitors, he states (seriously) if he needs to contact one of his chinese guests all he has to do is turn the WiFi off and the Chinese are down into the lobby in a flash asking "where WiFi?"

Also at breakfast the staff have to almost force them away from their smartphones to order... all heads down.. they don't even speak to each other!

Lest I am accused of racism, this isn't intended as a slight, but mate told me that they are far and away the most common....

Fareastdriver
12th Nov 2018, 20:51
I was in conversation with somebody in the mobile phone business on a flight from Heathrow to Beijing in 2004. She informed me that there were 750,000 mobile phones registered in China.

That was then.

G-CPTN
12th Nov 2018, 20:56
In 2015, China recorded 1.3 billion mobile subscribers in its domestic market.

SpringHeeledJack
12th Nov 2018, 21:35
For reasons perhaps due to culture, it seems to the casual observer that total immersion in smartphone utopia is very prevalent with all Oriental countries.

Prawn2king4
13th Nov 2018, 03:45
..... and the implantation of microchips?

Art Smass
13th Nov 2018, 03:50
They probably are the friends on the end of the phone. So they are chatting. You know just not in that old fangled way of speaking out loud. Like. Init.

They're probably texting the person sitting next to them:ugh:

Ken Borough
13th Nov 2018, 05:28
At least in Oz it would seem that we've a way to go. I just hope I'm not around to see it as part of daily life.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-03-16/opal-card-implant-man-pleads-guilty-transport-offences/9555608

radarman
14th Nov 2018, 21:19
Microchip humans - just like dogs. Great idea, the ultimate proof of identity. No need for passports, ID cards etc. So what would there be to stop me kidnapping that rich bastard up the road and transplanting his chip into my body? (Obviously a friendly vet or quack would be helpful). I would then legally become him, and have full access to his Ferrari, his yacht and his Swedish au pair. And unless I put my microchip into him, he would become a non-person. I bet the crims from some of the shadier parts of the world would quickly be on to this one.

G-CPTN
14th Nov 2018, 21:27
Whilst the concept of an implanted microchip might seem a good idea, the above p*st shows that there is a flaw.
Fingerprints are infallible (unless you indulge in some complicated surgery and skin grafting).

racedo
14th Nov 2018, 21:37
I remember a BBC radio play from decades ago and the plot revolved around a future society where everyone had an explosive implant in their brain linked to a central government control centre.
To stay alive people had to accrue credits through work or wealth and if you failed to keep up your credits a signal was sent out that triggered the explosive.
The central character was running low on credits and had sourced some on the black market but was rapidly running out of time as the gangsters closed in.
Can't remember how it ended though! :confused:

There is a movie of this with Cillian Murphy, Justin Timberlake and Amanda Seyfired called "TIME" from 2011.

Katamarino
16th Nov 2018, 16:31
The typical demographic of aviation is certainly showing itself here! Would you also all like these young whippersnappers to get off your lawns? :}

Mac the Knife
16th Nov 2018, 18:29
"...unless you indulge in some complicated surgery and skin grafting..."

You can't CHANGE fingerprints. But you CAN totally eliminate them.
But grafted skin on fingertips doesn't work that well (poor grip, poor sensation)
And no, you can't use someone else's fingertip skin (rejection)

Mac

{OTOH, faking fingerprints on objects is relatively easy if you have the original pattern}

Sam Asama
16th Nov 2018, 19:01
double_barrel's post (#5) sums up what I believe is THE biggest threat to democratic society -- or any kind of human society as we now know it. The gadgets and services we use (and can see and touch or otherwise consciously experience) are far less of a threat than what we DON'T actually see or use. Manipulation at a level not understood, or even contemplated, by most of us is at the crux of where we are all going. En masse. Like lemmings.

Ogre
17th Nov 2018, 10:02
At least in Oz it would seem that we've a way to go. I just hope I'm not around to see it as part of daily life.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-03-16/opal-card-implant-man-pleads-guilty-transport-offences/9555608

I recall reading a letter to a London news paper which went along the lines of "to the man who got on the number XX bus dressed as a wizard, and who apparently implanted the chip from his oyster card into the end of his wand, I salute you".

G0ULI
20th Nov 2018, 01:33
Fingerprints are not the answer. Years of working with abrasive and corrosive substances have rendered my prints unreadable by electronic devices. DNA is similarly not a complete answer as identical twins share the same DNA. Then there are organ transplant recipients, transfusion recipients and chimera syndrome sufferers to mention just a few conditions that can corrupt DNA readings. Basically it all comes down to trust and people believing that you are who you say you are. Everything else can be fabricated.