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TWT
8th Nov 2018, 00:26
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-11-07/spoons-disappearing-from-the-office-kitchen/10469728

Rather than conduct a study, it might have been easier to accept that people pilfer such items from the workplace and introduce a mandatory monetary contribution to account for it. 80% of the spoons were nicked during the study.

I've never worked in an office and can't understand why people pilfer teaspoons or steal someone else's lunch from the refrigerator :confused:

ExSp33db1rd
8th Nov 2018, 01:19
Travelling to Moscow I was advised to take basin/bath bungs as there were never any in the hotel, which I found to be true - question ... If every new bath is fitted with a bung, why would anyone want to steal one ?

sitigeltfel
8th Nov 2018, 02:09
Disappearing teaspoons ?

It's the Tea Leafs that take them !

flash8
8th Nov 2018, 02:12
I've never worked in an office and can't understand why people pilfer teaspoons or steal someone else's lunch from the refrigerator :confused:
The simple answer likely is because "they can get away with it".... there's nowt so queer as folk (if I can use that in its original sense) and you'd be surprised what lies behind a face of innocence. If there is one thing I have learn't in life it's never to be surprised at anything. Mind you personally I'd draw the line at knicking somebodies lunch... I'm a tad too hygienic and wouldn't know its source...

SpringHeeledJack
8th Nov 2018, 06:47
Perhaps tea spoons being small are more prone to being lost due to unintentional errors when clearing up, thrown in the bin etc ? Perhaps low-paid cleaning staff take them ? As to food in the staff kitchen fridge, often a strange psychological dynamic rears it's head in companies, where a 'family' is formed, however dysfunctional. Staff revert to childhood patterns where the parents fill the fridge with food and the kids take with little thought as to how/where said food came from. Adults would know better, but as above, 'there's nowt so queer as folk'.

ilvaporista
8th Nov 2018, 07:20
Perhaps I can be considered part of the problem. For many years we had a board in the office in Birmingham with our collection of Spoons Of The World. Every airline I have ever flown has been relieved of a tea spoon and most were on the wall,. When SU (of carbs fame) folded I had most of the collection returned to me. I still have one of my desk drawers filled with my spoon memories.
All of the Engineers took a keen interest in spoons and on a night out in a Balti house in Alum Rock we were surprised to find most of the cutlery was stamped Swiss Air.
Other notable spoons were from the plant managers at various automotive plants. These had their special place on the board.

Pontius Navigator
8th Nov 2018, 07:48
In a nurses home my wife had her breakfast tray, plate, toast, milk and jug, teapot and kettle of boiling water nicked.

Milk, sugar and tea are the most likely items to be borrowed.

Pontius Navigator
8th Nov 2018, 07:51
We do have a rather fine gimballed tea strainer from Ellerman Lines. I am just surprised we never had a full canteen.

ExSp33db1rd
8th Nov 2018, 07:59
Can't quite see the attraction of collecting spoons, didn't realise that they were even identifiable ? Now .... when it comes to hotel pens .....

VP959
8th Nov 2018, 08:05
I still have my old work teaspoon, the last survivor from several that were nicked. My solution to preventing this remaining old-timer from meeting the same fate was to get the model shop at work to engrave a large Traffolyte tag with my name, drill a hole in the handle of the teaspoon and get them to crimp a short length of 1/16" stainless steel wire rope as a lanyard to securely fasten the tag to the teaspoon. This worked a treat at preventing the spoon being nicked, a bit like the way some hotels put room keys on very large tags.

ShyTorque
8th Nov 2018, 08:05
Hotel pens? They donít work very well after youíve used them to stir your tea.

UniFoxOs
8th Nov 2018, 08:08
Back in the sixties it was our habit to visit the motorway services late at night after a skinful. We could access them via a country lane and the staff access road. We would eat in the truckers cafe, usually fish and chips or full english, depending on the time. I remember one occasion a cry went up from the serving counter "Who has got the teaspoon?" They only had the one left. Next time we went it was chained to the serving counter.

tdracer
8th Nov 2018, 08:31
No accounting for some people's behavior. Personally, I never had my food disappear from the 'fridge', but at the Boeing Rec Center I once came out of the shower to find my towel had been nicked :eek: Another time at a rather posh resort in Colorado, I got out of an outdoor hot tub to discover my $1 sandals were gone :confused:

However far and away the worst behavior I've heard of at a workplace was roughly 20 years ago. Boeing has a lot of 'community' coffee pots - in a kitchen area there is a coffee machine, a few individuals get together and run the coffee pot - buying the necessary supplies and charging a nominal amount per cup to cover the expenses. Well, at one the coffee pots, people noticed the coffee seemed a little off. Security was contacted and set up a surveillance camera which discovered an employee who was putting urine in the coffee pot :eek::mad:
The employee in question was fired...

blind pew
8th Nov 2018, 08:59
Had dinner with a BEA first officer, horses doures served on first class plates, with cutlery and napkins.
Steward nicked the drapes from vanguards, dyed them and adorned his flats windows.
Another the tape deck that played the boarding announcements.
Father used to nick the large glass ashtrays from banks in the 60s...he didn't smoke.
French will nick anything.. had my old paragliding boots nicked by a club member from Lyon during an emergency course at Annecy but "found"" them next day as too big for him..they have small feet, like their penisis or penii ? ..their noses make up for it.

treadigraph
8th Nov 2018, 09:12
I had quite a few tea spoons in my house 20 years ago - I'm now down to three. I suspect the accidental binning theory is most likely, unless it's the mice.

We had a spate of stuff being nicked from the fridge at work. Mate lost a sandwich and is still wound up about it a few years later "I was really looking forward to it". A pint of milk would last me a week, couple of bowls of cereal and a cup of tea every morning. Then somebody else started using it, my pint would last two days. Doctored one with a lot of salt and sugar - problem solved.

The worst thing about office fridges is the number of people who leave stuff in there to fester. Our lovely cleaner used to despair at the waste and once asked me whether she should really chuck a rather nice expensive looking lunch box - yes, the content was mouldy beyond belief, if they can't be bothered to remember it's there, bin it. Don't wash it up...

Don't get me started on the state of the kitchen sink every evening...

Innominate
8th Nov 2018, 09:23
I did find one of our teaspoons when I emptied the compost bin one spring...

It's a little-known fact that teaspoons are in fact the larval stage of wire coathangers, which when they reach their adult stage nest in wardrobes. Unfortunately the offspring of coathangers have a high mortality rate, which means that few produce viable teaspoons.

Discorde
8th Nov 2018, 09:35
After my parents’ divorce money was tight in our house. My mother could not afford to buy a new crockery set. But one of her friends worked at LHR and “acquired” a set for her. So visitors who came for tea would find themselves eating cake and drinking tea from cups and plates emblazoned with the logo of Argentine Airlines.

RedhillPhil
8th Nov 2018, 09:38
My cutlery drawer has a full (six of each) set of Eurostar cutlery. All retrieved from being dropped on the track or found under coach tables. They're all rather small but perfect for children. Whilst at Gatwick I grew exasperated at people helping themselves to my milk from the communal fridge. A few teaspoonfuls of salt in one container cured that.

Hydromet
8th Nov 2018, 09:42
It's a little-known fact that teaspoons are in fact the larval stage of wire coathangers, which when they reach their adult stage nest in wardrobes. Unfortunately the offspring of coathangers have a high mortality rate, which means that few produce viable teaspoons.Quite true, and the egg from which they hatch is the paperclip. Although there is often an abundance of paperclips, people often unconsciously twist them, which renders them unviable. Hence the shortage of teaspoons.

vctenderness
8th Nov 2018, 10:05
Back in the day when operating LAX to LHR groundstaff came on board and informed me that a very prominent Peer of the Realm and TV mogul was on our flight that night.

He added that I should keep an eye on him as he had been seen slipping the teaspoons from the First Class Lounge into his pockets!

Teaspoonery knows no bounds!!!

Sallyann1234
8th Nov 2018, 10:16
Milk, sugar and tea are the most likely items to be borrowed.They returned them after use? :(

DType
8th Nov 2018, 10:19
RR found that they lost far less cutlery after they stopped stamping the items "RR".
Gosh, what a surprise!

Groundgripper
8th Nov 2018, 11:19
RR found that they lost far less cutlery after they stopped stamping the items "RR".

I sem to remember that in the late 1960s the ashtrays at one of Royce's Derby sites had "Stolen from Rolls Royce" stamped on them.

GG

Krystal n chips
8th Nov 2018, 11:19
I still have my old work teaspoon, the last survivor from several that were nicked. My solution to preventing this remaining old-timer from meeting the same fate was to get the model shop at work to engrave a large Traffolyte tag with my name, drill a hole in the handle of the teaspoon and get them to crimp a short length of 1/16" stainless steel wire rope as a lanyard to securely fasten the tag to the teaspoon. This worked a treat at preventing the spoon being nicked, a bit like the way some hotels put room keys on very large tags.
Clearly, your colleagues lacked the acumen to get hold of a pair of snips......never crimped locking wire however, must be a special technique.
Never understood the kleptomaniacs who nicked the cutlery

I do have a fine collection of those blue pens wot you get from Barclay's however and a pair of sea boot wooly socks redistributed from the foyer of a certain hotel in Aboyne said socks being liberated from a chinless yah yah wonder and hence to a worthy cause ....moi.

double_barrel
8th Nov 2018, 12:43
Quite true, and the egg from which they hatch is the paperclip. Although there is often an abundance of paperclips, people often unconsciously twist them, which renders them unviable. Hence the shortage of teaspoons.


Did you know there are 2 paperclip morphs? Approximately half the population is wound clockwise and half anti-clockwise. Get a handful and take a look. Interestingly, if you sort into piles of clockwise and anti-clockwise and put each pile into a separate box, the 50-50 ratio is restored overnight.

chuks
8th Nov 2018, 13:41
It was often so in Vietnam that a group of guys in a barracks would have a community beer fridge that everyone was expected to keep stocked.

One bottle of beer looks just like the next one so that sometimes suspicions would arise, and one Warrant Officer had the feeling that another one was lagging badly when it came to buying his share. The suspect caught a suspicious glance and answered brightly that no, he'd just bought his very own supply at the PX, when one screw-top bottle of beer looks just like another one.

Another thing that looks just like a bottle of American beer is a bottle of piss, so that after he had emptied one of his own bottles the suspicious guy refilled it and then put it in there with his own supply of beer. Next evening he was sat there when the suspect came in and helped himself to one of "his own" beers, unscrewed the cap, took a deep swig, and ....

belfrybat
8th Nov 2018, 13:58
A place I worked at all the rage was stealing pens. Leave your desk for a pee, and if you'd forgotten to stow your pen, it and any tools and small items would be gone. I never understood the rationale behind it, and management had given up on controlling it.

At a novelty shop I found some pens with ink that evaporated after an hour or so, and bought a few. I left them around for the next couple of days and they duly disappeared. One of the bastards then had the gall to come after me, furious. He had written and signed some cheques, and wanted to blame me for the hot water he had landed in. I blankly denied any knowledge, and demanded positive proof.

Ancient Observer
8th Nov 2018, 14:24
I was on a RTW in J and flew from the West Coast to Sydney via Hawaii. (It was a weekend). UA upgraded me to F for one leg.
When I got home, I found a UA F spoon in one of my pockets. I have no idea how it got there. I have used it ever since for my breakfast cereal. It is bigger than a tea spoon, but smaller than a regular cereal spoon.
On one trip, I met the boss of UA in Europe. I apologised for the long-term borrowing of the spoon, and asked if he wanted it back. He did not want it back.

As to other domestic spoons, at home we do a lot of composting, using fallen leaves, grass and domestic food waste. At least 3 of our grapefruit spoons have spent a year or two being composted.

Bergerie1
8th Nov 2018, 15:08
It happen at all levels of society. Queen Mary had a similar habit. When she stayed with people she used to admire objects she desired and then expected her hosts to give them to her.

BehindBlueEyes
8th Nov 2018, 16:10
I’m guilty of participating in the disappearance of office teaspoons.

In the past, whenever I had a yoghurt in my packed lunch, I would use one from the staff cutlery drawer. Inevitably, the break came to a swift end because duty called, so said teaspoon would end up in lunchbox and then being taken home. Once there, lunchbox and its contents ended up either tipped straight into bin or the purloined spoon would be retrieved, washed and put into my cutlery stash. I had every intention of returning them, but just kept forgetting.

Several years ago, friends of ours travelled to the US on Virgin Atlantic Premium Economy. When their onboard meal was served, it came with two little black plastic salt and pepper shakers in the shape of propeller aircraft. As our son was fascinated by anything aviation based, they brought them home for him. When the shakers were handed to us, it made us chuckle to see that underneath there was an embossed message: Pinched from Virgin Atlantic!

funfly
8th Nov 2018, 16:11
In 1942 my parents ran a pub which was located near South Cerney Aerodrome (Tiger Moths, Prentices etc).
Parents noticed that sherry glasses were on the wane and wondered where they were all going, that is until they were invited to a wedding at the 'camp' and saw the present that the bridegroom's friends had 'bought' for the couple.
Well it was a set of a dozen sherry glasses!

chuks
8th Nov 2018, 16:13
Hotel pens and those little 3-sheet notepads you find by the phone are pretty much just giveaways, I think: small objects of little value with the name and address of the hotel on them. Not like towels and bathrobes, of course, but mainly put there to be taken as a sort of advertising. When you ask at Reception for a map of the town, ask for a pen and see what happens; you will be given one, cost about ten cents.

I remember one trip to Lagos on Lufthansa when a casual sideways glance caught this large Nigerian woman sat next to me industriously scrubbing food residue from her cutlery and stuffing it into her large handbag. (Business Class: stainless cutlery, and cloth napkins too!) Then she shot me that "What you lookin' at, White Man?" almost as if I were expected to apologize.

Safety briefing cards make good souvenirs of your flight, along with the life vest you can find under your seat.

I was on a ferry up in Scandinavia once when this rather obnoxious Yank told me that he, widely traveled, wanted to write a book full of tips for other young tourists come to do Europe. "What sort of tips did you have in mind?" I asked.

"When you go into a supermarket, pick out a nice piece of fresh fruit and eat it while you do the rest of your shopping, because fresh fruit can be expensive in Scandinavia. That sort of thing."

I told him that was actually considered to be shoplifting, a form of theft, which came as news to him. I did read an actual article featuring tips for the motorcyclist abroad which counseled hyper-agressive behavior at police checkpoints, winning through intimidation. Shout and scream at a guy pointing a gun at you, and why not? I guess the author had not thought of this "Hey, free fruit!" thing.

Hydromet
8th Nov 2018, 21:25
I blankly denied any knowledge, and demanded positive proof.
Written evidence, presumably?��

FullOppositeRudder
8th Nov 2018, 22:53
There have been a few references to that other consuming mystery - where the heck do all the ball point pens go to. I'm not referring so much as to what happens in a 'commercial office' situation, just domestically. I buy a pack of ten from Office Works and put it in the desk drawer. Within weeks the pack has dwindled to half the original number. One would expect pens to lying around everywhere, but no. Try to take a telephone message and they all go into hiding. Herself will only use a specific make and model of pen. She has the same problem, and comes in here accusing me of using 'her' pen. I know well enough NOT to even touch any of those!

The underlying mystery remains; where do they go? Do they levitate? Do they dissolve into nothingness? There needs to be a royal commission - or something. We've had them for less important matters after all.

TWT
9th Nov 2018, 00:36
The missing ball point pens are in the same place as your missing socks. I'm not sure where that 'place' is but I'm working on it.

treadigraph
9th Nov 2018, 00:40
My friend tells me scissors and staplers are the mystery disappearing items in her office.

MurphyWasRight
9th Nov 2018, 00:43
My favorite 'borrowed milk' incident was in an office where a slightly obnoxious IT sysadmin kept a cardboard carton of milk in the fridge which he used for breakfast. People would ''borrow" a little for their coffee which when done by a few resulted in lack of breakfast.
To make a point he punched a hole in the 'lips' of the milk carton and put a small padlock on it, within an hour someone had opened the other side.

The reason that stuff gets mouldy in the office fridge is simple, people don't want to accidentally toss someone else's food and it is easy to be uncertain if something is yours, especially after a month or 3 :).

On disappearing pens and pencils at home:
I recently got frustrated with having to hunt down pencils so bought a few boxes to saturate the kitchen and workshop.
When putting a box in the workshop in a 'clever place' where I knew for sure I would remember it I found the prior unopened box bought for the same purpose.

treadigraph
9th Nov 2018, 00:55
I had a rather spiffy chair in the office many years ago and one of our admin assistants, Tim, would often beat me into the office and nick the chair. He was a bit quiet when I arrived one morning and amid much laughter the other AA told us how Tim had breezed in, hung his coat up, waltzed his chair across to my desk, grabbed my chair and as he attempted to waltz it back to his desk had gone arse over tit... a length of cable and a padlock securing the chair to my desk had gone unnoticed and stopped the chair dead as it came up taut... Shame.

RatherBeFlying
9th Nov 2018, 16:18
Attrition became apparent in the home tableware when the younger son was making up and taking lunches to work:bored:

ShyTorque
9th Nov 2018, 20:24
If I'm home alone I make a point of using one teaspoon and one coffee mug, both of which are washed up and left to drain. Next time I re-use both.

If I'm not at home but my wife and daughter are, there are usually no teaspoons left in the drawer and no cups left in the cupboard. My wife will use a spoon, retrieve the tea bag from her cup, place it in the little glass pot she uses for the purpose and lays the spoon over it. Repeated many times during the day. When I get home the dishwasher is full with a queue outside and it looks like a mechanical spider is sitting on the worktop. Sometimes she just absent-mindedly throws the lot away, some spoons included. Drives me nuts.

She also had one of those battery powered, hand held vacuum cleaners. It was very powerful but had a small canister. She never emptied it before it became absolutely jam packed full and then would come complaining that it wouldn't pick up. I told her she must empty it very regularly. A few days later she came to me to say she had emptied it but it still didn't work properly, sounded funny and stank horrible. I took one look and saw that she had thrown away all the innards (filter canister and two washable filters) in the dustbin so the motor was jammed solid with dirt; muck was going in one end and out of the other. The bin men had already emptied the bin. Gone the same way as many of the teaspoons...

chuks
10th Nov 2018, 09:47
Thread drift, but ....

We just visited the States from Germany, when we took along a little plug converter for the phone charger, German to US standard. (Phone chargers don't care about voltage.)

So on our first morning there I walked into the bathroom to find Her Indoors using this weird gadget that looks like a very angry dildo, some sort of wand with bristles, and a fan in the handle. It styles her hair. She had it plugged in using the phone converter, and it seemed to be moaning, but not in the happy way that those actresses in porn films like to do. This was more like "pain and suffering."

She seemed to be not minding that it had been designed to use 220, not 120 volts. I was on the point of giving a lecture about what happens when you drop the voltage like that, but then I thought "What is the use?" and walked away.

Fridays are Trash Days here in the village, and last week I noticed that the dildo from Hell was in the bin. Wonder what happened to it? After a week on 120 volts it blew up the next time she hooked it up to 220 volts, something like that?

Never mind the teaspoons; what happened to my "BMW Motorcycle Training at the Nordschleife 1997" tee shirt. It was a bit ragged, but was that grounds for it disappearing into the rag bag?

TURIN
10th Nov 2018, 10:11
There have been a few references to that other consuming mystery - where the heck do all the ball point pens go to. I'm not referring so much as to what happens in a 'commercial office' situation, just domestically. I buy a pack of ten from Office Works and put it in the desk drawer. Within weeks the pack has dwindled to half the original number. One would expect pens to lying around everywhere, but no. Try to take a telephone message and they all go into hiding. Herself will only use a specific make and model of pen. She has the same problem, and comes in here accusing me of using 'her' pen. I know well enough NOT to even touch any of those!

The underlying mystery remains; where do they go? Do they levitate? Do they dissolve into nothingness? There needs to be a royal commission - or something. We've had them for less important matters after all.

As usual, the late Douglas Adams comes to the rescue...

Hitch Hikers Guide to the Galaxy-Biros (http://www.earthstar.co.uk/biros.htm)

Biros

Veet Voojagig, was a quiet young student at the University of Maximeglon, who pursued a brilliant academic career studying ancient philology, transformational ethics and the wave harmonic theory of historical perception, and then, after a night of drinking Pan Galactic Gargle Blasters with Zaphod Beeblebrox, became increasingly obsessed with the problem of what had happened to all the biros he'd bought over the past few years.

There followed a long period of painstaking research during which he visited all the major centres of biro loss throughout the galaxy and eventually came up with a quaint little theory which caught the public imagination at the time. Somewhere in the cosmos, he said, along with all the planets inhabited by humanoids, reptiloids, fishoids, walking treeoids and superintelligent shades of the colour blue, there was also a planet entirely given over to biro life forms. And it was to this planet that unattended biros would make thier way, slipping away quietly through wormholes in space to a world where they knew they could enjoy a uniquely biroid lifestyle, responding to highly biro-orientated stimuli, and generally leading the biro equivalent of the good life.

And as theories go this was all very fine and pleasant until Veet Voojagig suddenly claimed to have found this planet, and to have worked there for a while driving a limousine for a family of cheap retractables, whereupon he was taken away, locked up, wrote a book, and was finally sent into tax exile, which is the usual fate reserved for those who are determined to make a fool of themselves in public.

When one day an expedition was sent to the spatial coordinates that Voojagig had claimed for this planet they discovered only a small asteroid inhabited by a solitary old man who claimed repeatedly that nothing was true, though he was later discovered to be lying.

There did however, remain the question of both the mysterious 60,000 Altairian dollars paid yearly into his Brantisvogan bank account, and of course Zaphod Beeblebrox's highly profitable second-hand biro business.





http://www.earthstar.co.uk/pics/dontpanic.jpg (http://www.earthstar.co.uk/theguide.htm)

ShyTorque
10th Nov 2018, 10:14
Thread drift, but ....

We just visited the States from Germany, when we took along a little plug converter for the phone charger, German to US standard. (Phone chargers don't care about voltage.)

So on our first morning there I walked into the bathroom to find Her Indoors using this weird gadget that looks like a very angry dildo, some sort of wand with bristles, and a fan in the handle. It styles her hair. She had it plugged in using the phone converter, and it seemed to be moaning, but not in the happy way that those actresses in porn films like to do. This was more like "pain and suffering."

She seemed to be not minding that it had been designed to use 220, not 120 volts. I was on the point of giving a lecture about what happens when you drop the voltage like that, but then I thought "What is the use?" and walked away.

Fridays are Trash Days here in the village, and last week I noticed that the dildo from Hell was in the bin. Wonder what happened to it? After a week on 120 volts it blew up the next time she hooked it up to 220 volts, something like that?

Never mind the teaspoons; what happened to my "BMW Motorcycle Training at the Nordschleife 1997" tee shirt. It was a bit ragged, but was that grounds for it disappearing into the rag bag?

That reminds me - when my brand new, expensive stereo earphones were "just borrowed" for an evening by someone who shall remain nameless, they went missing. I later found them ripped to bits, wrapped around the rotating brush bar of the upright vacuum cleaner, which was "making a funny rattling noise" after said person vacuumed the floor by her side of the bed. No-one had done it though, they must have jumped in there all by themselves.

TURIN
10th Nov 2018, 10:15
There is also of course The Meaning of Liff to consider.

SCULLET (n.)

The last teaspoon in the washing up.

sitigeltfel
10th Nov 2018, 10:31
Every RAF section had its own tea swindle and many of them had a disgusting habit I railed against, to no avail. The teaspoons would stand in a receptacle filled with water, and after stirring their beverage, the user would put the spoon back into the murky water, sometimes without rinsing it, as if this would magically clean it.
I'm not sure who started this bizarre unhygienic habit, but it was prevalent.

Krystal n chips
10th Nov 2018, 10:57
Every RAF section had its own tea swindle and many of them had a disgusting habit I railed against, to no avail. The teaspoons would stand in a receptacle filled with water, and after stirring their beverage, the user would put the spoon back into the murky water, sometimes without rinsing it, as if this would magically clean it.
I'm not sure who started this bizarre unhygienic habit, but it was prevalent.

Siti old boy !

Tis possibly for the best you never graced an engineers crew room....... other than to rebuke for some obscure reason one or more of the inhabitants that is ......the standards of food and beverage hygiene would have traumatised you for life ! .....let alone the dining utensils . Always pristine I can assure you.......well, possibly not always quite as pristine as wot they could have been......cough.

What would be even more traumatising for you however, is to see what ends up deposited behind an aircraft galley...trust me, for those of a sensitive disposition like yourself, the worlds supply of smelling salts would be depleted in less than 5mins.

ShyTorque
10th Nov 2018, 11:24
Point is though, it's just as easy to be clean as it is to have unnecessary, filthy habits.

TURIN
10th Nov 2018, 13:00
K n C has a point. If you think that's bad, I remember watching my old apprentice mentor, ex Vickers airframe fitter, stirring his tea with a GS with only a quick wipe on his dirty overalls before hand. What really got me though was the fact that half an hour earlier he was using the same screwdriver to route out blue ice from the toilet servicing point on a Trident 3b.

G-CPTN
10th Nov 2018, 13:21
It's the hot water that kills 'em (the jarms that is)

What doesn't kill you makes you stronger . . .

Pontius Navigator
10th Nov 2018, 14:07
If I'm home alone I make a point of using one teaspoon and one coffee mug, both of which are washed up and left to drain. Next time I re-use both.

If I'm not at home but my wife and daughter are, there are usually no teaspoons left in the drawer and no cups left in the cupboard. My wife will use a spoon, retrieve the tea bag from her cup, place it in the little glass pot she uses for the purpose and lays the spoon over it. Repeated many times during the day. When I get home the dishwasher is full with a queue outside and it looks like a mechanical spider is sitting on the worktop. Sometimes she just absent-mindedly throws the lot away, some spoons included. Drives me nuts.

She also had one of those battery powered, hand held vacuum cleaners. It was very powerful but had a small canister. She never emptied it before it became absolutely jam packed full and then would come complaining that it wouldn't pick up. I told her she must empty it very regularly. A few days later she came to me to say she had emptied it but it still didn't work properly, sounded funny and stank horrible. I took one look and saw that she had thrown away all the innards (filter canister and two washable filters) in the dustbin so the motor was jammed solid with dirt; muck was going in one end and out of the other. The bin men had already emptied the bin. Gone the same way as many of the teaspoons...
Wrong thread.. It should be in the Grumpy thread. Anyway you owe my some screen wipes.