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57mm
1st Nov 2018, 20:56
My 13 year old dog was put to sleep today. He was suffering from arthritis and an eye ulcer which caused his one remaining eye to rupture, together with other ailments that meant it was kinder to let him go rather than keep him going. It felt like losing a child; that's wrong, maybe, but that's how it felt. Farewell, the best Wingman I ever had.....

hiflymk3
1st Nov 2018, 21:04
Sorry to hear that, the loss of a much loved pet is heartbreaking.

Piper.Classique
1st Nov 2018, 22:08
I'm sorry for your loss. I don't know if dogs have knowledge of approaching death, but I do know you did the kindest thing in shortening his suffering. May I suggest you plant a tree in his memory? Maybe somewhere he liked to go for walks?

Super VC-10
1st Nov 2018, 22:16
Sorry to hear of your loss. They leave paw prints on you heart, don't they? Been there, done that - cats, not dogs. Lost my cat last February. Got a new Manx kitten in August. Another chapter in the book of life.

clareprop
1st Nov 2018, 22:22
I feel your pain.

Cheerio
1st Nov 2018, 22:50
Only time a grown man can cry is when his dog dies. It's a horrible feeling and must be something very hard wired. So sorry for you. Wish they lived longer :(

G-CPTN
1st Nov 2018, 22:52
You will meet again:- Rainbow Bridge (https://www.rainbowsbridge.com/Poem.htm)

tartare
1st Nov 2018, 22:53
Had never owned a dog until five years ago when the kids insisted we get one.
I now can't imagine the household without him.
Your grief is entirely understandable.
The idea of a tree is a good one.

BehindBlueEyes
1st Nov 2018, 23:54
Said goodbye to our 15 1/2 year old Lab in August. His back legs were getting so weak and he was losing sensation in his rear end as he was prone to the odd accident - after being such a clean dog for years. Still beating myself up over 12 weeks later as to whether I hastened his end prematurely and the fact that when it came to it, I was so distraught I couldn’t even stay in the room at the end.

Hydromet
2nd Nov 2018, 02:34
I feel your sadness.
Three years ago we adopted a 9yo lab x poodle when his owner got dememtia. He spent 6 weeks in kennels, because no one wanted an 'old' dog, despite the fact that he has been well trained and has a wonderful personality. In desperation, my daughter asked if I would take him. I couldn't resist him, and he has rewarded our hospitality with unconditional love (that's what dogs do, isn't it). Sadly, he's just starting to slow down, but I hope he has a few more years left.

megan
2nd Nov 2018, 02:51
A month ago began your journey 57mm. Our 13 YO Beagle was diagnosed with Anal gland cancer. Given three options, $1,500 or $6,000 operations, or pill treatment. Advice was to go the pill route as operations would be too stressful on the animal at this late stage in his life. Been given 12 months. Has been an absolute joy, and is enjoying, as much as he can in the heat of our outback summer, a caravan trip with we his parents. So sorry for your loss, and not looking forward to ours, even though we've been through it all before.

FlamantRose
2nd Nov 2018, 03:44
I feel very sorry for you as I know what your feelings are in this moment. I have lost quite a few dogs and cats in my life and it is each time a very painful time. For me it is the same as loosing some beloved person, family or friend, as I consider my pets like children. Of course many cannot understand this as they don't love animals. We now have 8 pussy cats at home. The eldest one will be 16 in a few months and the youngest around 5. They were all stray cats (kittens) and they love us as much as we love them. My wife and I will both be 80 in a few months hope to remain in good shape for many more years.

FullOppositeRudder
2nd Nov 2018, 04:57
I'm saddened to hear of your loss. I know how it feels; it's been six years since I had a similar decision to make about my old mate, also of about 13 years. I still miss the head that would come and rest on top of my knee when I was at this desk. It's amazing how these wonderful creatures find a way into our hearts and affections as they do. I will never get another one - sometimes what you had cannot be replaced, and it's easier to live with the memories. Your plan may be different of course, but in the meantime be assured that there are people out here whom you have never met who know just how you feel, and share your emotions at this sad time.

FOR

Krystal n chips
2nd Nov 2018, 07:39
My 13 year old dog was put to sleep today. He was suffering from arthritis and an eye ulcer which caused his one remaining eye to rupture, together with other ailments that meant it was kinder to let him go rather than keep him going. It felt like losing a child; that's wrong, maybe, but that's how it felt. Farewell, the best Wingman I ever had.....
You sum up your loss and emotions perfectly and naturally with your comparison to losing a child. Pets have their own charisma and personalities which enhance and enrich our lives along with responding to the care and affection we give to them.

This is another reason I have been known to less than diplomatically express my sentiments towards those who opine "it's only an animal " or who cause needless distress and harm to animals.


Just like humans, please enjoy the memories and please remember it's only the body that dies, the soul and the spirit remain for when you meet again.

treadigraph
2nd Nov 2018, 08:12
I haven't had a pet for years but I fully understand the emotion. I've always enjoyed the company of pets owned by friends and family and I all but adopted a neighbour's cat and was very sad when they moved away (the neighbour was also rather gorgeous and had a very sunny nature!) - if I wasn't allergic to them I would have a cat...

Just like humans, please enjoy the memories and please remember it's only the body that dies, the soul and the spirit remain for when you meet again.

After a friend died recently, there was some debate with another friend about afterlife and he's adamant there is none. I disagree. I like to think there is a perfect pub there that's always open, it's always sunny and everyone you've known and loved will be there - I will be able to have that pint that a colleague and I promised each other after a mild disagreement at work and which sadly he didn't get the time to enjoy...

57mm
2nd Nov 2018, 11:21
Thank you all.

57mm
2nd Nov 2018, 13:44
Thank you all for your thoughtful and considerate responses. There are good folk on JB.

gemma10
2nd Nov 2018, 14:49
As a German Shepherd owner for the last thirty odd years I feel your pain and grief. I`ve said goodbye to four of them over the years and have wonderful memories of them all. I hope you can look back on your life with him with lots of videos and photographs.

Captivep
2nd Nov 2018, 16:26
All of us who've ever had animals in their lives know exactly how you feel; it's horrible but perhaps you can console yourself with the thought that your dog loved you as much as you loved him...

Mac the Knife
2nd Nov 2018, 17:12
Be glad that you were there to do for him that one act of love and give him peace.

I've had patients who would have envied him.
Keeping some poor guy alive I remarked to the nurse, "If you did this to an animal, you'd go to jail"
"Yes", she said, "and quite right too!"

Sad for your loss, but happy for your dog. Treasure your memories as he did.

Mac

Pinky the pilot
3rd Nov 2018, 09:03
I know how you feel, Mate.:sad:

double_barrel
3rd Nov 2018, 15:02
All of us who've ever had animals in their lives know exactly how you feel; it's horrible but perhaps you can console yourself with the thought that your dog loved you as much as you loved him...

I held my 15 year old black lab on the table and held her foreleg to raise the vein as the vet did the deed. It took far too long as it was a struggle to find the vein and get it done cleanly. When we finally got it in and the dog's head went down, I tried to let go and I realized my arms were absolutely locked solid - I had been so tense without realizing it, just willing that needle to go in cleanly and not to hurt her. I had no doubt that I had made the right decision at the right time, but it was still a very difficult event.

dogsridewith
4th Nov 2018, 01:17
Said goodbye to our 15 1/2 year old Lab in August. His back legs were getting so weak and he was losing sensation in his rear end as he was prone to the odd accident - after being such a clean dog for years. Still beating myself up over 12 weeks later as to whether I hastened his end prematurely and the fact that when it came to it, I was so distraught I couldn’t even stay in the room at the end.

The indoor "accident" may be the most emotionally pain full thing an older dog can experience. Ambulatory dogs that are failing will go outdoors and lay under a bush and stay there, regardless of weather. Might come in if coaxed due to desire to obey, but will leave again if still physically possible.

Nervous SLF
4th Nov 2018, 02:48
We know the pain when a pet departs so much so that we will no longer have anymore as at our age
the heartache would be even worse than in the past. Our last sad event was in 2016,we also are concerned
about what if the pet survived us as we would never know what would happen to said pet and again the worry
is to much.

paulc
4th Nov 2018, 13:21
When my mum's 2nd westie died she was very upset and did get a rescue dog (Nelly) even though the chances were it would outlive her. Mum was fully aware of this so had arranged for the Dogs Trust to take Nelly on if that happened. (which it did but luckily a work colleague was looking for a dog and took her on so i know she is being very well looked after)

ShotOne
4th Nov 2018, 15:43
Sorry to hear of your loss, 57mm.

Dutystude
4th Nov 2018, 16:10
Not for the first time we lost a four legged friend about 8 years ago. We made a pact: no more; it is too heartbreaking.

Mrs Dutystude lasted about 6 months before I found her surfing ‘Puppy Porn’ on the web.

Border Terrior this time. Most affectionate dog we have ever had.

G-CPTN
4th Nov 2018, 17:33
Most affectionate dog we have ever had.
My long-departed Bassett hound that I had when I was a teenager, would bound up the stairs after my mother had let her out first thing for a wee in the garden, jump up onto my bed, tunnel down the bedclothes and return up and lay beside me with her head on my pillow.

tdracer
4th Nov 2018, 21:10
I held my 15 year old black lab on the table and held her foreleg to raise the vein as the vet did the deed. It took far too long as it was a struggle to find the vein and get it done cleanly. When we finally got it in and the dog's head went down, I tried to let go and I realized my arms were absolutely locked solid - I had been so tense without realizing it, just willing that needle to go in cleanly and not to hurt her. I had no doubt that I had made the right decision at the right time, but it was still a very difficult event.
People who haven't had a dog can't understand - they really do become part of the family.
I've had two dogs that passed on - both went quickly and naturally so I've not had to make that decision - same thing with my parents dogs while I was growing up (when one got hit by a car and killed, I doubt my mom could have been any more upset if it had been one of us kids). I hope I never have to make that decision - I have a wonderful Britney right now and we are best buds. He's about 9 years old (got him as a puppy), the idea that he probably has only a few more good years is bad enough. I don't know if I could handle having to make that decision if it came to that.

cavuman1
4th Nov 2018, 23:00
Dear Hurting High Caliber,

Would that I could offer better comfort in your time of loss than to say “I empathize”. Now in my eighth decade with too many canine companions alive in my memory (nine) but gone now and unable to smother me with kisses and icy noses and I them with kisses reciprocated and hugs and pats; I miss them more than most of my bipedal friends who are no more.

I think the beauty and depth of the bond shared between Homo sapiens sapiens and Canis familiaris is an ancient, deep and irrevocable one. Ten or fifty-thousand years ago (depending upon whose paleobiological archeological views one gives credence), an hungry, perhaps curious, certainly brave quadruped stepped forward, probably uneasily, to take a scrap of food from a biped. This happened between one human and one dog, though there might have been numerous representatives of each species present. One thinks of that spectacular scene in Dances With Wolves, but I believe the actuality was even older and more sacrosanct, though bacon might be the Meaning of Life!

The bond was enjoined. The bonding was irrevocable. “I will protect you!” claimed the dog with slightly bared fangs and gentle, unthreatening waggly tail. “I will feed you!” promised the human with a pat and a bite of some Neanderthal delicacy. So at that very moment, we became irrevocably interdependent.

Now we have interbred those wolves to give rise to all sorts of wonderful and beautiful beasties; and they, along the too-short road of evolution, have watched us stand a little more upright with not quite so much hair and arguably more intelligence. Yet they never gave up their immutable trust of us as we never surrendered our intrinsic need of them. And respect...

That is why they rush to us when we come home, wagging their tails. That is why we embrace them with hugs and pats and food and protection. We are, with them, involved in an amazing partnership, a very precious and rare symbiosis. We need one another.

When we lost our thirteen-year old Ozzie Bear, a Skipitapointapotador, nearly two years ago, we wept uncontrollably. O.K. – you want to know the breed. It is one-fifth each: Kangaroo, Pit Bull, Pointer, Hippopotamus, and Black Labrador Retriever - a wonderful and unique beast.

His ashes are in a reliquary, lovingly hand made by a dear friend out of rare and beautiful wood, which is in a place of honor in our living room. Ozzie’s cremains are beside our front door; we pat him still when we go out or return. We miss him (and all of his predecessors) as we shall always. We still weep. No one sees. We feel the light forth-dimensional breeze as he wags his tail.

When we euthanized Ozzie, I e-mailed all of our friends. I told them the truth. I said “His cold nose kept our hearts warm.”

It did.

Thus is the ancient and irrevocable bond.

- Ed

RedhillPhil
5th Nov 2018, 10:25
I'm sorry for your loss and I feel your pain.
I lost Horrible Hairy Harry in February 2017. I still miss him. I will never get another dog, Harry was very special and irreplaceable to me.

https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/pprune.org-vbulletin/640x480/p1000968_33f93eb342136d06ca971fa238a58d6d08a65d25.jpg

Barcli
5th Nov 2018, 15:43
I know your pain my friend.
We have lost Labradors over the years, 3 actually and a Flat Coated Retriever at 3yrs. After losing the Flat Coat , we got a Golden Retriever. He was euthanized last September 24th ( 14 months ago). I held his head until he went. Nothing has been the same since.
Yes, we have now two Goldens ( puppies still) ( from the same father bloodline) but there was something very different in losing Oscar. I have lost my parents and my sister but nothing was as bad as losing Oscar and I really cant answer why !!
Dogs are remarkable animals.

paulc
5th Nov 2018, 20:25
Its the unconditional devotion that dogs give owners that is hard to replicate in a person to person relationship. Dogs are far more empathic, they know when you are upset or sad and do their best to divert your attention away from such thoughts by dropping a toy in your lap or just being close to you.

BehindBlueEyes
5th Nov 2018, 21:27
You are so spot on paulc. A dog never judges you or has an ‘off’ day. He’s always pleased to see you. There’s that old joke about how to test whether your dog loves you more than your wife. Lock them both in the car boot and when you open it, see who’s the happiest to greet you. We always used to joke about our Lab being in charge of both the welcoming committee and security; both roles he took most seriously. He was all bark until the door was opened and then his tail was like a fast moving rudder. He wagged so much that his body from the waist down was sometimes at right angles to his chest. As has been said on the ESP thread, I definitely had a psychic connection with him. I only had to think about perhaps taking an extra walk and he was there - ready to go. He was the softest animal and tolerated children climbing on him, lifting his lips to look at his teeth and being dressed in a bonnet but one afternoon when Mrs BBE was alone in the back garden, a chap came through our side gate because there was no answer at the front door. The Lab stood his ground, rumbled and raised his hackles and bared his teeth. The interloper turned tail and left pronto. I’ll never know if he would have carried out his threat but he was definitely protecting a family member.

In his later years, he used to have vivid dreams in which he would run and bark, sometimes waking us up. For weeks after we lost him, I would wake in the early hours convinced for a few seconds that I had heard him again. Such a huge gap in our household at the moment.

Hydromet
6th Nov 2018, 01:37
BBE, our late Kelpie/Lab was also OIC welcoming & security. If anyone came to the front door, she would bark until they were let in, then be all friends. However, if anyone entered the property by the side gate, they would continue to be barked at and have their heels nipped until they left - uusually quickly.

Sir Niall Dementia
6th Nov 2018, 12:46
When my time comes I hope my chat with St Peter goes a bit like this:
https://cimg4.ibsrv.net/gimg/pprune.org-vbulletin/552x411/19601094_1479761698713778_6158418411900392527_n_bcd23bdf0d61 a3e4a27ab2f0acc0de31c6a76a72.jpg
SND

double_barrel
6th Nov 2018, 14:08
I think the beauty and depth of the bond shared between Homo sapiens sapiens and Canis familiaris is an ancient, deep and irrevocable one. Ten or fifty-thousand years ago (depending upon whose paleobiological archeological views one gives credence), an hungry, perhaps curious, certainly brave quadruped stepped forward, probably uneasily, to take a scrap of food from a biped. ......

Thus is the ancient and irrevocable bond.

- Ed

And then dogs shamelessly evolved to exploit our deepest, hardwired emotions, the crafty little buggers
https://cimg2.ibsrv.net/gimg/pprune.org-vbulletin/369x532/frisbee_0602096ff4a23a50d12a58fcffcbd1b4f72df8b7.jpeg

I believe its frisbee time

treadigraph
6th Nov 2018, 14:21
I believe its frisbee time

The vacuum cleaner wheel just fell off... honest!