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rotornut
26th Oct 2018, 22:33
https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2018/10/25/york-police-charge-toronto-woman-with-witchcraft-and-fraud-over-600000-evil-spirit-scam.html

N707ZS
26th Oct 2018, 23:13
Didn't know Theresa May was visiting Toronto.

CoodaShooda
27th Oct 2018, 06:31
Interesting. Pretending to practise witchcraft was supposed to have been removed as an offence from the Canadian statutes last year. I am not aware that being an actual witch is proscribed by law.

But I guess "Fraudster poses as witch", although more accurate, doesn't cut it as a headline.

ORAC
27th Oct 2018, 08:08
Did she float?

rotornut
27th Oct 2018, 08:15
N707ZS - lol - my wife will love that as she hates Theresa!

Criminal Code of Canada:


365 Every one who fraudulently

(a) pretends to exercise or to use any kind of witchcraft, sorcery, enchantment or conjuration,
(b) undertakes, for a consideration, to tell fortunes, or
(c) pretends from his skill in or knowledge of an occult or crafty science to discover where or in what manner anything that is supposed to have been stolen or lost may be found,
is guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction.

sitigeltfel
27th Oct 2018, 08:45
(a) pretends to exercise or to use any kind of witchcraft, sorcery, enchantment or conjuration.

Does that include turning bread and wine into flesh and blood ?

ORAC
27th Oct 2018, 09:07
The offence would have to be independently transubstantiated.....

Blues&twos
27th Oct 2018, 10:35
"Crafty science" - love it!

That would be all of it, then!

charliegolf
27th Oct 2018, 10:45
Does that include turning bread and wine into flesh and blood ?

Only if one 'fraudulently' turned the bread and wine into flesh and blood.

CG

Krystal n chips
27th Oct 2018, 12:19
The last recorded case of witchcraft in the UK was between 1979-1990

Sadly, Pendle Hill was never included in her travel itinerary.

chopper2004
27th Oct 2018, 20:02
Burning at the stake ??

So are all the locals coming out with their pitchforks lol

cheers

rotornut
28th Oct 2018, 00:37
No only the media. They'll take the ball and run with this one!

Tankertrashnav
28th Oct 2018, 11:28
Sorry to darken the mood of a so far light-hearted thread but a belief in witchcraft is still widespread in certain parts of Africa and other parts of the world, and it can lead to tragic results. In the trial reported here the couple were not convicted of witchcraft, but murder, plain and simple, but their beliefs obviously lead to their actions. Incidentally contrary to popular belief witches were not burned at the stake in England but hanged. Burning was the punishment for treason in England, although I believe that they burned witches in Scotland.

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2012/mar/01/couple-guilty-boy-murder-witchcr (https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2012/mar/01/couple-guilty-boy-murder-witchcraft)

cdtaylor_nats
29th Oct 2018, 00:36
A Scottish woman Helen Duncan was imprisoned in 1944 for pretending to be a witch.

There was a 1951 Fraudulent Mediums Act which produced several prosecutions.
In 2008 it was replaced by general consumer protection laws.

ORAC
29th Oct 2018, 07:42
Presumably they are now prosecuted for not operating within the spirit of the law?

Ibanez001
29th Oct 2018, 13:50
If they are then prosecuted, jailed but escape we could see the headline "Small Medium at Large".

Ancient Observer
29th Oct 2018, 19:02
Wot? No mother in law jokes?

ORAC
30th Oct 2018, 07:42
I presume those convicted are sentenced to a spell inside?

meadowrun
30th Oct 2018, 09:18
I have known a couple.
Mercurial and things are good, sometimes., somewhere

sitigeltfel
30th Oct 2018, 10:01
Incidentally contrary to popular belief witches were not burned at the stake in England but hanged. Burning was the punishment for treason in England, although I believe that they burned witches in Scotland.

https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2012/mar/01/couple-guilty-boy-murder-witchcr (https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2012/mar/01/couple-guilty-boy-murder-witchcraft)

It's much colder up there, they appreciate a warm fire.

Mac the Knife
30th Oct 2018, 19:48
Well, over here of course, I would say 99.9% of the Black population believe in witchcraft and the power of the ancestors. Really truly scarily believe.
Even wealthy black businessmen in their top BMWs pop into the local sangoma before an important meeting or contract signing.
De rigueur before a job interview. Ads. all over the place, some of the hilarious. Cure anything, fix anything, love, business, aphrodisiacs, AIDs.
Big business. A top witch can (and does) earn a fortune. Much better bet than medical school!

Very deeply embedded part of the culture, so no jokes please.

Every now & then someone is identified as a 'bad' witch and gets 'necklaced' with petrol and an old tyre rammed over the shoulders. Smells terrible!

Mac

eko4me
30th Oct 2018, 20:43
I remember one bad one in Kwa Zulu - children's body parts were involved. Local Zulu police hesitant to get involved due to the 'strength' of this sangoma. Eventually the local Parks Board personnel effected an arrest because they had educational qualifications/degrees and were immune from his 'power', and he was handed over to the community. Slowly impaled on a stick up his rectum I believe. This was the mid 1980's.

eko4me
30th Oct 2018, 21:30
On a lighter note, my mate's father at the time owned a chicken processing factory in Eshowe in the Natal midlands - all Zulu staff. He was having terrible problems with stock shrinkages with chickens disappearing out of the system such that it was jeopardising the whole enterprise. After failing with normal security measures, he took a trip up to Nongoma - near the Zulu Royal Kraal - and engaged the most expensive*, and thus most powerful sangoma in the whole of Zululand, and had him come down to Eshowe for a little assembly in front of the entire workforce of the chicken factory. Ceremonies were performed, spells cast, and the great wizard proclaimed that if there was any further shrinkage, the perpetrators would die! No further losses were experienced and business blossomed. A Master Stroke of South African industrial relations.

*Most expensive, because you didn't want the union to engage an even more powerful sangoma to overturn the curse.

Mr Optimistic
30th Oct 2018, 22:24
Think I married her.

jimtherev
31st Oct 2018, 00:13
Well, over here of course, I would say 99.9% of the Black population believe in witchcraft and the power of the ancestors. Really truly scarily believe.
Even wealthy black businessmen in their top BMWs pop into the local sangoma before an important meeting or contract signing.
De rigueur before a job interview. Ads. all over the place, some of the hilarious. Cure anything, fix anything, love, business, aphrodisiacs, AIDs.
Big business. A top witch can (and does) earn a fortune. ..........terrible!
Mac
A modified version exists in London with some black-led churches. I've watched a number of times the ceremony when a brother from the church across the road buys his new beemer. The pastor brings his elders out to the street and they gather round the front of the car and call down blessings on the cylinder block.
The pastor himself has a new 7-series of course...

Haraka
31st Oct 2018, 09:04
African Albino children continue to be very much at risk, since their body parts are thought to be strong muti in many local cultures.

chuks
31st Oct 2018, 09:49
One of my colleagues in Nigeria had some stuff go disappear-oh from his room, when the steward was the suspect. Our man hired a local ju-ju man and fired up a couple of mosquito coils for a properly smoky atmosphere in the room. Then he had the ju-ju man confront the steward under threat of some sort of supernatural retribution, when justice was achieved.

Another time I read an article in a local paper, about a fellow who had been hit and killed by a falling tree branch during a rain storm. The article was a quite reasoned inquiry into how this man, a person of seeming good character with a wife and children, could have hidden his wicked nature such that Shango had seen fit to do away with him. It was taken for granted that this was not some random death due to accident. Shango, the Yoruba deity of thunder and lightning, had to have killed him because of his wickedness, so that the only questions were "What had he done?" and "How had he hidden what he had done?"