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WingNut60
24th Oct 2018, 02:51
Quote from US Today via Microsoft News

Hurricane season is most powerful on record this year

By Doyle Rice - 24 Oct

I was wondering just how many hurricane seasons one should expect in one year?

sitigeltfel
24th Oct 2018, 06:13
I presume each region has its own hurricane season?

Old 'Un
24th Oct 2018, 06:35
Does Doyle Rice mean "This year's hurricane season is (the) most powerful on record".

Putting words in the wrong order, he is.

Thanks Yoda.

Uplinker
24th Oct 2018, 12:44
Hurricanes that form off West Africa and make landfall in the USA generally appear between mid August and mid November. They form at the end of summer when the sea water gets warm enough.

WingNut60
25th Oct 2018, 00:40
Let me re-phrase that --

Hurricane season is most powerful on record this year ?? WTF???

Of such things GCC is made.

ORAC
25th Oct 2018, 08:00
That it is the strongest this year is a fact, that it is the strongest on record is not.

DaveReidUK
25th Oct 2018, 08:08
Does Doyle Rice mean "This year's hurricane season is (the) most powerful on record".

Putting words in the wrong order, he is.

But isn't that one of the strengths of the English language - that you can change the order of words and only a few dimwits fail to comprehend the meaning ? :O

Mostly Harmless
25th Oct 2018, 17:26
https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTcA5UXxNtwbfABVCrJFFm6rLvaJw1g-0N3UdjRnvK84ymvHFxr

dook
25th Oct 2018, 17:30
But remember the Americans do not speak English and do not understand it.

G-CPTN
26th Oct 2018, 14:44
I was in some foreign place where a small independent shop had a sign in many languages declaring that they spoke that particular language.
After the English declaration was written "We also understand American."

Trossie
26th Oct 2018, 16:00
But isn't that one of the strengths of the English language - that you can change the order of words and only a few dimwits fail to comprehend the meaning ? :O
You should say what you mean accurately and not be the sort of dimwit who cannot put words in the correct order! (Accurately dimwit mean should cannot order correct say who you sort order you of and be in the put what words not.) "But isn't that one of the strengths of the English language" Unless you have the power of the force with you...

However, to the rest of us that statement clearly says that there is more than one hurricane season in a year. Or that the person making the statement is a dimwit, especially if 'English' is his home language.

But then the points about that transatlantic quaint version of the language are very valid.

Sam Asama
26th Oct 2018, 16:24
...But then the points about that transatlantic quaint version of the language are very valid.

Oh Trossie... You've given us a superb example of why people should refrain from pedantry on Internet forums (fora, if you prefer...) https://www.pprune.org/images/infopop/icons/icon7.gif

A thing is valid or it is not valid. It can not therefore be "very valid". Nevertheless, I suppose you'd be offended if I called you a dimwit -- as you did to DaveReid.

Sam

Trossie
26th Oct 2018, 16:30
Not offended! Just happy to stir up a valid debate! (See, I avoided being a 'dimwit' there!!)

Yes, I prefer 'fora'..

Gertrude the Wombat
26th Oct 2018, 17:58
But then the points about that transatlantic quaint version of the language are very valid.
I do luuurve recursive jokes! :D

But why "transatlantic quaint" is wrong and "quaint transatlantic" is right (... on this side of the Atlantic anyway ...) is beyond my knowledge of grammatical jargon to explain.

Trossie
26th Oct 2018, 19:18
I do luuurve recursive jokes! :D

But why "transatlantic quaint" is wrong and "quaint transatlantic" is right (... on this side of the Atlantic anyway ...) is beyond my knowledge of grammatical jargon to explain.
"Quaint" is referring to the 'version of the language'. "Transatlantic" is referring to the 'quaint version of the language'. Or summa' li' 'a'.