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spekesoftly
23rd Oct 2018, 10:45
I've received a letter from DVLA inviting me to renew my UK driving licence which expires in just under three months from now. If I apply now, will the the new licence expire three years from the date of issue, or three years after my 70th birthday?

I passed my driving test back in the 1960s and still have an original valid paper licence, so it will be my first photocard application, which I intend to do online.

I understand that I will lose some 'Grandfather Rights' to drive certain categories of larger vehicles, but is there anything else I need to be aware of?

I've checked my driving licence information held on the GOV.UK website, and I will keep a photocopy of my exisiting paper licence.

This may seem a little over cautious, but I've read about instances of problems in the past.

I'd especially appreciate replies from anyone who has recently renewed their licence approaching age 70.

jolihokistix
23rd Oct 2018, 11:01
A little birdie tells me that it will run from your 70th birthday for three years. Your basic categories will also run for those same three years. It should be pretty straightforward, although the DVLA bullied my wife out of hers. Just make sure all the paperwork is in order first time.
(Despite her taking the risk and sending her Freedom Pass by post, which on the form was deemed acceptable, they would not accept it and wanted proof of residence at address. We sent a gas bill, but they said it had an initial and surname, not her complete first name, so that was rejected too. By this time the window had passed and they rejected her application. Unfortunately she had by then lost the will to fight any further for it.)

spekesoftly
23rd Oct 2018, 11:26
Many thanks for the replies, much appreciated. :ok:

ian16th
23rd Oct 2018, 14:17
You also cannot renew from an address outside of the UK.

er340790
23rd Oct 2018, 14:33
My old man is still happily driving at 85 and remains accident free for 68 years (he's SEEN hundreds!!! :E)

I think his GP had to approve his licence renewal after (heart) issues a decade or so ago. Apart from that, it's all been plain sailing. :ok:

UniFoxOs
23rd Oct 2018, 15:18
I decided to forego the large vehicle rights as I thought I wouldn't need them any more, just to make the application easier. Three weeks after renewing - I needed to drive a 7.5 tonne truck and couldn't. Had to do the job with several trips in a smaller truck. Pain in the neck, and two days hire of the smaller truck was more than the one day I would have needed in the bigger one.

Flypro
23rd Oct 2018, 17:00
A mate decided he wanted to retain all the benefits of his original licence when he hit 70 and it wasn't easy. A lot of form filling plus another form required from his GP for which he was charged. The GP messed up his form and it was returned to mate to sort out. As far as I know, he still hasn't sorted the problem out.

ShyTorque
23rd Oct 2018, 18:47
A few years ago I was told the tale of a chap who had renewed his licence, as required at the age of 70. When it came back to him, DVLA had removed category 'A' from it (motorcycles). It was very awkward because although he had passed his car test many years before, he didn't own a car and never had - he was a dyed in the wool motorcyclist. DVLA wouldn't accept that they had made a mistake.

My advice is to ensure you keep photocopies of both sides of the licence and the paper counterpart where applicable, if you still have it.

VP959
23rd Oct 2018, 19:02
A few years ago I was told the tale of a chap who had renewed his licence, as required at the age of 70. When it came back to him, DVLA had removed category 'A' from it (motorcycles). It was very awkward because although he had passed his car test many years before, he didn't own a car and never had - he was a dyed in the wool motorcyclist. DVLA wouldn't accept that they had made a mistake.

My advice is to ensure you keep photocopies of both sides of the licence and the paper counterpart where applicable, if you still have it.

I had the opposite experience when I passed my motorcycle test, in that I was issued a pink slip, sent it off with my red provisional licence and received a full licence that included motorcars, despite never having driven one and only being 16 years old. When I got a car a couple of years later I just drove it for a few years, then in my early twenties started feeling guilty, so applied to take a car test. The test went OK and I passed, then the examiner asked to see my licence as he was filling in the paperwork. It took a lot of explaining to convinced him that I wasn't pulling a prank. He also asked if I'd driven to the test centre alone, but thankfully I'd had the foresight to get my then girlfriend to accompany me, and she had a "proper" full licence.

Worrying to hear that they can take categories away at 70. I'm a few years off, but do still ride a motorcycle, regularly tow a boat trailer under grandfather rights and have hired a 7.5 tonne truck a few times. Seems like caution is needed when renewing the licence.

Pontius Navigator
23rd Oct 2018, 20:17
We three kings of orient are
One in a taxi
One in a car
One on a scooter
Blowing his Hoover
Towing an armoured car

Now I know who was on the scooter

ShyTorque
23rd Oct 2018, 20:18
Here's a relevant link, albeit some eight years old:

https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/removal_of_entitlements_and_lack

Interesting to see how many "lost" categories related to motorcycle licence renewals, bearing in mind the likely numbers of car and motorcycle licence holders compared to those renewing "car only" licences. DVLA must have had a lot of careless operatives on their staff between 2008 and 2010.

chevvron
23rd Oct 2018, 22:02
I've received a letter from DVLA inviting me to renew my UK driving licence which expires in just under three months from now. If I apply now, will the the new licence expire three years from the date of issue, or three years after my 70th birthday?

I passed my driving test back in the 1960s and still have an original valid paper licence, so it will be my first photocard application, which I intend to do online.

I understand that I will lose some 'Grandfather Rights' to drive certain categories of larger vehicles, but is there anything else I need to be aware of?

I've checked my driving licence information held on the GOV.UK website, and I will keep a photocopy of my exisiting paper licence.

This may seem a little over cautious, but I've read about instances of problems in the past.

I'd especially appreciate replies from anyone who has recently renewed their licence approaching age 70.
Did it a few weeks ago. You don't need to photocopy the old paper licence; they send it back.
It would appear I can ride more powerful motorbikes with 'L' plates now although I haven't got round to converting 'Kw' to 'hp' so I don't know how powerful; it used to be max 12 hp and max 125 cc when I last rode one.

Gertrude the Wombat
23rd Oct 2018, 22:43
they send it back.
Unless they don't, and it is presumably to guard against this risk of a cock-up that one takes a copy first.

happybiker
23rd Oct 2018, 23:00
They did not send my licence back when I reached 70 in July 2017, I retained a copy and recommend all should do so. The DVLA is not in England and if this may be a problem if you are not in Wales!!

ExSp33db1rd
24th Oct 2018, 00:12
You also cannot renew from an address outside of the UK.

Which was when I finally gave up trying to pretend that I still lived in the UK. I kept a UK licence going for many years using a family UK address, not being sure that I would never need a UK licence again, and not wishing to have to undergo another test, maybe ? When the photo licence came along, then I would have had to tell too many lies, so finally gave it up.

I " believe" that one can only hold one driving licence from any agency at any one time, one is allowed to use the existing one for a short time when moving to live in a different country, but must eventually obtain the new one.

He also asked if I'd driven to the test centre alone, I recall the Australian wife of a friend presenting herself for a UK driving test to obtain her new licence. She failed the test, so just removed the "L" plates and drove off, still being within the period allowed to drive on her Aus. licence !

Loose rivets
24th Oct 2018, 00:16
I've posted before about a bobby puffing after us on his bicycle. I pulled up in our high street and mum got off the back of my Matchless still sporting L plates. "It's okay, I've got a full licence for bikes and cars." And so she had, never having taken a test on either.

cavortingcheetah
24th Oct 2018, 00:22
The grandfather rights privilege is not as clear as it might sound. I think that you will lose them unless you specifically apply to have them included in your new licence. The grandfathering items can be quite useful in civilian life, once in a blue moon or so. If you do apply for the categories concerned (I cannot remember what they are) then the DVLA might send you a D4 medical form which your GP can complete, for a charge I suppose.
The sleight of hand seems to lie in the fact that the rights to drive a lorry or bus are not granted automatically. You have to specify that you want them and then comply with any further requirements such as a medical. You will not though, have to take a specific driving test on the categories in question.

Pontius Navigator
24th Oct 2018, 09:11
ExSpdBrd, it was fairly routine for some of my less law abiding colleague in Cyprus to run both UK and Cyprus licences and collect penalties on the one or the other.

On renewal and types, we changed addresses and thus renewed our licences in February. My new licence now expires on 1_Feb next year almost 3 months prior to my 76th. I must also check categories as it appears I can now ride a motorcycle under Category A but modified by 79(3) which is tricycles only.

ian16th
24th Oct 2018, 11:51
Which was when I finally gave up trying to pretend that I still lived in the UK. I kept a UK licence going for many years using a family UK address, not being sure that I would never need a UK licence again, and not wishing to have to undergo another test, maybe ? When the photo licence came along, then I would have had to tell too many lies, so finally gave it up.

I " believe" that one can only hold one driving licence from any agency at any one time, one is allowed to use the existing one for a short time when moving to live in a different country, but must eventually obtain the new one.

A further problem; in theory a UK licence can be obtained in exchange for an approved foreign one.
So I can have a 'new' UK one for my SA one, can't I?

Err, maybe.

I obtained my SA one in exchange for a UK International Driving Permit, from the AA. This was on the strength of my legal UK Licence.
Now if I return to the UK and try to get a licence for my SA one, on the website I have to fill in a drop-down for the country where I passed my driving test.

UK, where I passed my test, is not an option!

The system assumes that one took ones test in a foreign country.

Well I do have a Cypriot M/C licence, but it ran out in 1965.

olympus
24th Oct 2018, 16:37
I've posted this before...

When I went to live in Dublin and once I was settled with an address that wasn't an hotel, I applied for a Republic of Ireland driving licence by submitting my UK licence in exchange. In due course my new Irish licence arrived accompanied by my UK licence which had been returned to me!

For a number of years I kept both licences going; after leaving Ireland I used a friend's Dublin address until my friend moved to China (she was a diplomat) and it all became too much of a hassle.

funfly
24th Oct 2018, 16:47
I see a lot of 'older' drivers who should never be allowed on the road. In my case I have just got a 'First' in the Advanced Driving Test so there might be many of us over 80 still able to drive OK.

DType
24th Oct 2018, 17:04
That 80+ yo couple who drove 8 miles wrong way on M40 in broad daylight - they must both have been totally incapable.
Except, of course, that the driver must have been able to declare him/herself fit to drive within the three year window..
Still don't know why DVLA don't ask the driver's GP instead of the driver, the questions are all yes/no, no opinions.
And self certification is a farce in all situations.
Grumpy old man, me???

PS Unless.of course, the driver has concealed his condition from his GP!!!

Pontius Navigator
24th Oct 2018, 18:53
DType, some years ago I almost entered the M180 in the wrong carriageway. The exit lane was not far from my planned exit road and not well sign posted. I am sure more than a few here will have been confused on large roundabouts.

DType
24th Oct 2018, 19:19
Yes, but with horror one quickly realises one's mistake, and sorts it out.
Not done that particular one yet myself (as far as I am aware!)

Pontius Navigator
24th Oct 2018, 20:22
Yes, but with horror one quickly realises one's mistake, and sorts it out.
Not done that particular one yet myself (as far as I am aware!)
​​​​Agree, I know of two recent incidents, one, after a number of hours she pitched up at the start point. She had forgotten where she live d which was 100 miles away. Another , 90, driving down A1 missed her turn, eventually stopped and daughter had to drive down and find her.

You don't need to drive to get lost. Friend's parents caught wrong National Express coach. Had no clue where they were or how to reach destination.

Perhaps we need regular lost peoples' places

ExSp33db1rd
24th Oct 2018, 22:58
Now if I return to the UK and try to get a licence for my SA one, on the website I have to fill in a drop-down for the country where I passed my driving test.

UK, where I passed my test, is not an option!


Ain't the digital age wonderful ? Can you print out the page, amend, it, scan it and send it back ?

My only ever driving test was also UK. ( probably even before it was UK, Great Britain and Northern Ireland seems to ring a bell ?

In the RAF, at an RCAF flying school, the local butcher issued local licences in exchange for English ones, and conducted tests for those with nothing. Having bought a couple of local cars, a group of us attended his shop on a Saturday morning, and of course he was too busy to break off serving his customers for the w/end, come back on Monday. Cannot, on the camp etc. Oh, well I guess you all have English licences haven't you ? Rhubarb,rhubarb, muttered some of the group, OK just fill out these applications and I'll sign them off. Forms signed we then took some of the gang back to camp, giving them their first driving experience on the way !

I see a lot of 'older' drivers who should never be allowed on the road. In my case I have just got a 'First' in the Advanced Driving Test so there might be many of us over 80 still able to drive OK.

Just taken the local AA free offer of a " Mature Driver " assessment. Not a pass or fail issue, but I was told that I would have passed. Don't mess about with old folk.

Pontius Navigator
25th Oct 2018, 08:20
Drove up the A1 yesterday, absolute pleasure. Doing 70, allowed about 50 yards to car ahead, BMW keeping station 50 yards behind, occasional truck would pull into the gap, overtake a slower mover, pull back in. No need for braking and very fluid.

As I approached my junction I pulled into left lane and slowed to 60 and started to pass the slower movers in the outer lane.

davews
25th Oct 2018, 09:42
DType, some years ago I almost entered the M180 in the wrong carriageway. The exit lane was not far from my planned exit road and not well sign posted. I am sure more than a few here will have been confused on large roundabouts.

Indeed, so did I (A18/A15 junction near Scunthorpe). Admittedly it was dense fog at the time, wanted the A15 and almost realised too late that the M180 exit was not the A15.... Yes, mistakes happen.

And reading this thread with interest as I reach the wonderful 70 next year.

jolihokistix
25th Oct 2018, 10:21
Borrowing a friend's TomTom for a first-ever trip to a garage near Stansted I came off the M11 to a series of connected roundabouts. Foolishly I listened to the unfamiliar voice and its timing was all off and confusing. I found I would have done better to trust my old instincts. You need to learn what to accept and what to ignore from your navigation system. That reminds me of a track day when a professional driver took me round the circuit in the Skyline GTR. "You need to jiggle the steering wheel round the corners a split-second faster than the computer can dictate!" he said.

Even so, I can see the day when extensions of the driving license might bring conditions, for example when you hit 80 you can only drive a car which is fitted with automatic braking, or at 90 any car you drive car might have to be semi-autonomous. In fact I feel that these new semi-autonomous vehicles are more suited to the very new driver and extremely aged markets.

funfly
25th Oct 2018, 11:12
Drove up the A1 yesterday, absolute pleasure. Doing 70, allowed about 50 yards to car ahead, BMW keeping station 50 yards behind,
Safe distance at 70 is just under 100 yards, i.e. around 2 seconds gap.

PDR1
25th Oct 2018, 11:44
Safe distance from a following BMW is around 7 miles...

PDR

Pontius Navigator
25th Oct 2018, 12:46
Safe distance at 70 is just under 100 yards, i.e. around 2 seconds gap.
i didn't want to seem a road hog. It was probably nearer 150-200 and certainly a huge gap in relation to many.

And an observation: I noticed today that cars, having overtaken me, slow down as they pass trucks ahead if me. Are they checked by slip stream or 'caution' thinking that slowing is safer?

funfly
25th Oct 2018, 15:46
PN,
didn’t want to be a smart ass.
I have recently become a bit of a ‘good’ driver for reasons I need not go into here, however keeping to speed limits and maintaining a good distance from the car in front (which I do) does mean that I am followed by a procession generally with one right on my bumper and the gap between me and the car in front is often filled by a less patient driver.
Interesting fact the driving down a motorway at 70 results in me often having the inside lane to myself!
FF

Pontius Navigator
25th Oct 2018, 16:06
interesting fact the driving down a motorway at 70 results in me often having the inside lane to myself!FF
And going faster than the lemmings in the outer lanes? Just have to watch out for the inswinger.

Saw one yesterday, came in from the slip, balls out, straight to outside lane cutting up the car that had just joined ahead of him (imagine it). Then brakes on as he slowed to lane speed. I then cruised past him in lane 1. Our hero was only 100 yards ahead 15 minutes later

dook
25th Oct 2018, 17:39
Well, I'm 71 and some years ago did the IAM test.

I was taught by a volunteer police class1 driver and for one trip the briefing started with:

"Today we are going to learn to drive two cars at once. Yours and the one behind you."

A lesson never forgotten to this day.

G-CPTN
25th Oct 2018, 18:25
I was taught by a Police 'Class 1' instructor and was taught 2/3rds frd and 1/3rd behind (observation) - and always to have an identified 'escape route' in case of emergency (ie where you would have your 'accident' avoiding others - this doesn't sound positive, but it is).

dook
25th Oct 2018, 18:51
I was also taught that.

VP959
25th Oct 2018, 18:57
The thing I found most useful during the advanced driving course (not anything to do with the IAM, just a work-related thing) was commentary driving. I still find myself doing it now, years later, much to my wife's displeasure. There's something about voicing everything you observe that makes you far more aware of what others are doing, or likely to do, than just looking. I've often thought that it would be a good technique to use when teaching people to fly; get the student to keep a running commentary on everything they observe.

dook
25th Oct 2018, 19:51
This is no longer recommended by the IAM and is considered a distraction.

Speaking as a retired RAF QFI the student is never asked to do this for the same reason and is potentially dangerous.

Pontius Navigator
25th Oct 2018, 19:51
I was taught by an armoured car driver in a Hillman Minx. None of this nonsense driving low powered mini cars ☺

ExSp33db1rd
25th Oct 2018, 22:46
One thing I remember from my IAM test was that overtaking is TED time Time Exposed to Danger, i.e. get out and back in as fast as possible, within sensible bounds of safety of course. Unfortunately the NZ Police are aware of this, and position themselves around corners just past obvious stretches of roads where drivers will finally have the chance to pass - a rare event in NZ - and your momentary excess speed will enable them to swell the coffers of their Christmas Party Fund. At Public Holiday times the advertised "margin" of 10 % over any posted limit is reduced to 4 Km. and vigorously applied, so if wishing to overtake someone driving at 90 Km on a 100 km stretch of road, you will need XX days ( can't be hassled to do the maths ) to complete the manouevre.

Gertrude the Wombat
25th Oct 2018, 22:57
if wishing to overtake someone driving at 90 Km on a 100 km stretch of road
Yeahbut why would anyone care about that? - at best it'll get you to where you're going a couple of seconds earlier. and when I've been driving around NZ I've been much more interested in looking at the scenery than staring at the boot of the vehicle in front for tens of miles hoping for a chance to overtake.

Loose rivets
26th Oct 2018, 02:29
G-C said,

. . . and always to have an identified 'escape route' in case of emergency (ie where you would have your 'accident' avoiding others - this doesn't sound positive, but it is).

Hmmm . . . my pal did that, bein' a Class I and all, on the M4 I think. Quick escape onto the hard shoulder only to have the screeching driver do the same thing. It was all paid for, but still spoilt his weekend away.

For the most part, Class I police drivers are expected to have zero accidents. Or it used to be so when the roads weren't so crowded. Same mate had a car come around a corner on a housing estate and hit him head on. No problems, his boss was with him and agreed there was nowhere to go.

I was driving, I confess, a 7 series BMW, factory spec 5 on the floor and lowered suspension. (one of the few cars the Rivetess hated driving - a great Germanic tank.) Anyway, just about to go over the brow of a half mile long dip and I become aware of a white car passing my rear right quarter. Flippin' 'ek, thinks I. He can't see what's coming from there.
I put two wheels on the grass to make room and took in a young bobby being bellowed at by the equivalent of a QFI. He looked just like a teenager with a cross dad. I was so glad I'd really shoved over hard as stuff was coming up the hill.

Another time I left the Colchester traffic headquarters on a blue and white Suzuki super-bike. I was wearing the distinctive leathers of same pal which I'd bought from him. I caught one of their road traffic cars up in a nearby village only to be treated to a cabaret by the QFI. He tore at his hair, pretended to poke his baton in the ear of the young cop and then even beat him over the head with it - I suspect, all for my benefit as my mate had a great sense of humour. I hadn't got the heart to raise my visor and look astonished - I wanted to get a move on anyway, and once out of the village slid smoothly up to my normal 100-120 with no quibble from them.

Coming home yesterday on a really busy B road I shoved over for a fast motorbike about to pass. Traffic about 40, bike 40 - 100 in bursts, mostly hatched centre lane. It looked good and sounded better. Bad, as in naughty, but good as in adrenalin-pumping, scrotum-shrinking temptation.

I haven't raced through traffic for decades, wouldn't dream of it now, just a squirt when open farmland either side and a nice windy road with no traffic. Find a patch or two with wet mud just to hone the old reactions - and test the computer thingies. They were beyond spectacular on the BMW. Turn them off and it's back to the E-Type days. It really is an advanced set of algorithms these days.

ExSp33db1rd
26th Oct 2018, 08:34
Yeahbut why would anyone care about that? - at best it'll get you to where you're going a couple of seconds earlier. and when I've been driving around NZ I've been much more interested in looking at the scenery than staring at the boot of the vehicle in front for tens of miles hoping for a chance to overtake.

Well, some of us have seen the scenery for the last 20 years, so it's old hat, beautiful tho' it might be, and know every bump and bend, and precisely when there will be an opportunity to have a go after many miles of wondering if we'll make the appointment, despite leaving in plenty of time and now following two camper vans enjoying the scenery. At least they usually travel slowly enough to make overtaking a possibility, it's the 50 kph driver in the 80 zone, or the 80 kph driver in the 100 zone that slow everything down, coupled with the second vehicle in the line not making the most of every opportunity. Remember the UK ditty from the 50's ? It's Number 2 what starts the queue, Yah ! Boo ! to Number 2.

jimtherev
26th Oct 2018, 10:46
...staring at the boot of the vehicle in front for tens of miles hoping for a chance to overtake. Surely the whole point here is that staring at the vehicle in front is in itself potentially dangerous. Having one's forward vision obstructed is not good. Having it obstructed by anything bigger than a small saloon car means that one can't have a good view of the road ahead and driving accordingly. One is instead limited by the (unknown) skill of the driver in front... and if they are more interested in looking at the scenery - or the activities of their significant other - or their telephone conversation, then I'd rather be in front of 'em and away at my own speed and my own business.

treadigraph
26th Oct 2018, 11:05
My sister drives around southern England a fair bit and often complains of feeling tired after trips of just an hour or two. Having followed her for 10 miles cross country once I'm not at all surprised. Right up the tailgate of the vehicle in front, brake lights showing frequently... all observed from mostly 100 yards behind and very little use of my brakes. Pointed it out but she wasn't convinced. Been a passenger with her several times since, just the same.

DType
26th Oct 2018, 13:57
Agree with the comments about being able to see ahead of the vehicle immediately in front, but I have to confess to being caught out a few times when focused on the traffic ahead and the immediately in front vehicle does something illogical - so far without accident/incident.
But as to speeding/overtaking, some seem to be on a different planet from me. After you have followed a juggernaut for several miles as it crawls up hills, stops on sharp corners/narrow bridges to let oncoming traffic through, and speeds up to 50mph on the first decent straight, then I get past tout de suite - and have the points on my licence to prove it.
It is NOT simply the time saving between 50 and 60 mph.

Krystal n chips
26th Oct 2018, 14:22
The thing I found most useful during the advanced driving course (not anything to do with the IAM, just a work-related thing) was commentary driving. I still find myself doing it now, years later, much to my wife's displeasure. There's something about voicing everything you observe that makes you far more aware of what others are doing, or likely to do, than just looking. I've often thought that it would be a good technique to use when teaching people to fly; get the student to keep a running commentary on everything they observe.

Ah,....an advanced driving course you say.

Please remind us of the number of RTA's you have subsequently been involved in........ as presented to the world on here.

There again, possibly they omitted certain driving techniques from this course......same as, for example, the extraction of those inside a crashed vehicle on a first aid course.

Pontius Navigator
26th Oct 2018, 15:18
jimtherev, quite. Being forced to adopt someone else's driving style is irksome. Like driving at a reasonable speed but then they slow as a car approaches or they slow excessively for a bend or drive at 20 in a 30 zone before accelerating to a reasonable open road speed again.

GTW, it is not a question of saving seconds.

Gertrude the Wombat
26th Oct 2018, 18:04
Well, some of us have seen the scenery for the last 20 years, so it's old hat, beautiful tho' it might be ...
Yeah, I knew that would be the answer ... Similarly I couldn't comprehend people sitting on the Manley Ferry reading their newspapers (it'll no doubt be playing with phones these days).

Of course Cambridge is different - WTF are all these tourists doing standing around in the middle of the road gawping at these boring tedious 500+ year old buildings that I've seen thousands of times before when I want to cycle through them at a decent cruising speed?

Gertrude the Wombat
26th Oct 2018, 18:05
It is NOT simply the time saving between 50 and 60 mph.
It's still only a few seconds, though, 'cos of the next juggernaut a few hundred yards further on. And the one after that. And the one after that.

Pontius Navigator
26th Oct 2018, 19:08
GTW, you have evaded the point that several of us have made, it is far less tiring to drive to our personal style which matches the capability of our vehicle than try and match your style.

To use an aviation context (sorry) in a formation the leader uses less fuel than his followers.
​​​

aerobelly
26th Oct 2018, 20:30
YOf course Cambridge is different - WTF are all these tourists doing standing around in the middle of the road gawping at these boring tedious 500+ year old buildings that I've seen thousands of times before when I want to cycle through them at a decent cruising speed?

So you're the buggah who ran into me this afternoon as I was crossing Sidney Street while checking where how far away the showers were on my phone??

'a

Gertrude the Wombat
26th Oct 2018, 21:19
So you're the buggah who ran into me this afternoon as I was crossing Sidney Street while checking where how far away the showers were on my phone??
Nah, not this time -:ok: - I was in theory thinking of joining in the #CamRideHome but by the time I'd got home from work (via the northern busway, not the city centre) I decided it was too cold to go out for a bike ride in the dark for fun.

DType
27th Oct 2018, 15:57
Actually, GtW, I often get a few miles of deserted road in front of the juggernaut, so I can have lots of FUN, especially as they never seem to put any speed cameras on the interesting twiddly bits. And what is life if there is no fun?

anchorhold
27th Oct 2018, 16:15
If you took the UK car licence before the nineties, you should have C1 on your licence, which includes 7.5 tonnes plus 750kg trailer, I think this remains on your licence beyond 70, but it requires a HGV type medical, despite the fact that 7.5 is not really HGV. If you are having medicals with an AME, then he ors he should be able to sign the 'HGV' medical at the same time. It is handy to keep the 7.5 licence, for the odd removal. It is also worth checking what the situation is with motorhomes > 3.5 kg.

One other thing that I'm intrigued about is in light of the present 'campaign' against older drivers, is will this become an excuse to increase insurance premiums particularly for the over seventy group.

KelvinD
27th Oct 2018, 16:24
That is interesting re the C1 category. I passed my UK test in 1977 but while I have half an alphabet on my plastic, there is no mention of a 'C' of any variety.

Gertrude the Wombat
27th Oct 2018, 17:03
A, B, C1, D1, some complicated stuff to do with trailers, F, K, L, N, P

Paper, not plastic. Says it's valid from 1976, but I'm thinking that that might be when I got the motorbike licence added, because I was driving cars before that.

Pontius Navigator
27th Oct 2018, 17:14
I think before 1976 may be standard as mine is the same.

G-CPTN
27th Oct 2018, 18:20
this remains on your licence beyond 70, but it requires a HGV type medical, despite the fact that 7.5 is not really HGV.
I included myself out because of the medical - not that I couldn't pass it, but it is a recurring requirement, and the possibility of using it is very remote.

I don't think I am still entitled to drive a heavy locomotive or a track-laying vehicle.

radar101
28th Oct 2018, 09:18
It is also worth checking what the situation is with motorhomes > 3.5 kg.

I've just bought one of those for my 6 month old granddaughter to sit on :)

Allan Lupton
28th Oct 2018, 13:56
I think before 1976 may be standard as mine is the same.

That was the year we went from annual renewal (stick-in page in booklet) to the paper job valid until ones 70th birthday.

longer ron
28th Oct 2018, 15:40
Just a little potted partial history from a driving website blog.

The changes in the 1970s were even more radical. By 1973, there were more than 20 million drivers on Britain’s roads. The old manual system was, therefore, increasingly unfit for purpose. So, in 1973, licensing was computerised. Out were the old red booklets—in were new green paper licences. Then, in 1976, full driving licences became valid until a driver’s 70th birthday, ending the need to renew every three years. The extension also applied to provisional licences from 1982.

I have a plastic licence and mine all runs from 1974,but I had passed both bike and car tests before 1976 (Car 1971,Bike 1974)

Pontius Navigator
10th Nov 2018, 14:12
Just renewed my licence online. The last expiry had crept forward almost 3 months to 75 3/4. The renewal notice is now 2 1.2 months early. Interesting to see when it is valid to. I used the option to renew online which forfeits my right to drive mini buses. I could only retain that with a paper application.

Thomas coupling
10th Nov 2018, 17:58
https://www.pprune.org/jet-blast/615255-age-discrimination.html