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Tankertrashnav
21st Oct 2018, 00:34
Has anyone noticed that nobody, even animals, ever dies these days? Everybody now "passes away", no matter what the circumstances. I can get it if your old granny, who has been in failing health for some time "passes away" in her sleep, but it's got to the point where I recently heard a police spokesman (person?) saying that two people had passed away in a bad traffic accident. The final straw was on Facebook today when someone was reporting that a missing cat had been found on the road near their house, but unfortunately it had "passed away"!

Seems that every generation has to be squeamish about something. Past generations were reluctant to talk openly about sex and other bodily functions, but now language which would have shocked our grandparents is commonplace. On the other hand simply saying that someone is dead seems to be unacceptable, and some euphemism has to be employed, as though that was going to make the situation less painful. Do any other weasel words exasperate you?

I was going to say we ought to call a spade a spade, but I fear I might have the race relations people down on me!

Uplinker
21st Oct 2018, 01:19
For some reason I am reminded of Monty Python’s dead parrot sketch !

“It has passed on, it has ceased to be,” etc.

WingNut60
21st Oct 2018, 01:27
Do any other weasel words exasperate you?


One or two.

WingNut60
21st Oct 2018, 01:27
Wasn't there another thread along these lines just recently?

Ran to several hundred pages.

India Four Two
21st Oct 2018, 01:33
I saw John Cleese do the Dead Parrot sketch live during the Pythons' Canadian tour.

Even more inventive euphemisms than the TV version, culminating with " 'e f**kin' snuffed it!"

I agree about the "passed away" euphemism. Even worse is "passed"!

uffington sb
21st Oct 2018, 02:47
Didn’t the cops in the Las Vegas mass shooting say that the gunman had “passed away” after shooting himself.

Nomad2
21st Oct 2018, 06:12
The word "killed" seems to be avoided a lot these days too.

For example, "two terrorists, a soldier and thirty member of the public died today in an explosion".

This implies they met their demise in a less than violent manner. I'd suggest, "were killed" fits much better than "died".

KelvinD
21st Oct 2018, 07:15
Totally agree re the current trend to use the phrase 'passed away' and agree even more so with India Four Two re the use of 'passed'. Maybe I have been unlucky but a review of the death certificates of my father, mother and sister shows they all died. No passing away in my family!
On the other hand, I have passed many exams in my time and I have passed many other people on the road yet, as far as I am aware, no deaths ensued!

sitigeltfel
21st Oct 2018, 07:39
After the Manchester Arena terrorist bombing, Theresa May claimed lives were "lost" and that relatives had suffered a "loss".

It's not as if the victims were one day going to return !

:rolleyes:

UniFoxOs
21st Oct 2018, 08:42
Another vote for I42's comment. Next we'll be having "I passed him" and the listener not knowing if I overtook him or killed him.

Pontius Navigator
21st Oct 2018, 08:54
Now if we acknowledge that passed is related to a Jewish holiday . 😀

ORAC
21st Oct 2018, 09:27
Wasn't there another thread along these lines just recently? Ran to several hundred pages.

Passim....

Blues&twos
21st Oct 2018, 09:39
Passed away is a particular pet-hate of ours. Earlier this year my wife refused to have 'passed away' in the obituary for her dad when it was suggested, instead insisting on ''died'.
Why do people ponce around when there are perfectly good, accurate words already??

chuks
21st Oct 2018, 10:22
The fox that passed his brother under a bush ....

There is this thing now with the use of the passive voice, one that avoids all causality and blame. There was a cartoon in the New Yorker where the accused is testifying that "I pointed the gun at him and I squeezed the trigger. Suddenly, a shot rang out!"

The perpetrator and his victim get all mixed up, which is only proper if you agree that nobody is guilty until proven so. Actually, it's merely that under some forms of law those who have been accused are giving "the presumption of innocence," which is not the same thing at all as innocence itself. It's then taken to be so that all three, the victim, the witness, and the killer of the victim, have the same legal status, which is simple nonsense.

A black comedian had the death of Tupac in his routine, speaking about how some commentators had it that the late crapper had been "assassinated." No, he said, Martin Luther King had been assassinated, Tupac just got shot and killed! Well spoken, that!

treadigraph
21st Oct 2018, 10:36
Seems that every generation has to be squeamish about something. Past generations were reluctant to talk openly about sex and other bodily functions, but now language which would have shocked our grandparents is commonplace. On the other hand simply saying that someone is dead seems to be unacceptable, and some euphemism has to be employed, as though that was going to make the situation less painful. Do any other weasel words exasperate you?

I agree entirely. My mum died. A good friend of mine was recently found dead.

Sick animals are no longer put down or put to sleep in the press*. They are euthenised. It's a recent pretension as far as I can recall.

*Sorry... Media.

Tankertrashnav
21st Oct 2018, 11:03
Wing Nut - sorry it I am repeating a recent thread. I either missed it or more likely I have just forgotten it :(

I did just remember though that in another thread I had to ask what "kinetic effect" was in relation to air ops. I was never that hot on aerodyamics and I assumed the phrase was related to that. Then somebody kindly informed me "we don't say"bombed/bombing these days". Presumable those on the ground pass away as a result of kinetic effect!

hiflymk3
21st Oct 2018, 13:29
Recently bumped into a lady we know. She said she'd "lost" her husband a couple of month ago.

I was tempted to suggest she looked in the shed or behind the sofa but thought better of it.

G-CPTN
21st Oct 2018, 14:30
She said she'd "lost" her husband a couple of month ago.
I would accept that - after all, she had, indeed, lost her partner.

Nemrytter
21st Oct 2018, 14:50
Do any other weasel words exasperate you?Plenty. Listing them would, however, upset the delicate petals on this forum.

A_Van
21st Oct 2018, 15:09
Totally agree that "passed" and "past away" being applied to all the cases often sounds strange if not irritating. Though English is not my native language I definitely know it is very rich and such simplifications look not good.

As for some other exasperating words, I would mention using Mr in front of ultimate scums and sons of a [email protected]@ch. E,g,, when I read/hear that "Mr" Andreas Breivik (that intentionally killed 77 kids in Norway) is complaining about uihumane conditions in prison (having 3 personal cells, can do sport, cooking, playing cards and music) my first reaction is "maybe you call him a gentleman too?"

charliegolf
21st Oct 2018, 15:25
Totally agree TTN, and having had my bro and sis die on me in only 14 months, I've had cause to ponder my mortality. I have made it absolutely clear that when I die, I will have died! I will not have, 'passed on', 'passed away', or 'fallen asleep'. The latter is cringingly common on headstones of late: "Beloved father and brother, fell asleep on..."

There, better now!

CG

fitliker
21st Oct 2018, 15:28
Lost could be appropriate to describe a loss , especially if you are unsure as to which direction they have moved. Up or Down ? Or simply six feet down .
Who knows, but it does sound better than shuffling off this mortal coil . He shuffled down to the hospital when his tumours made running a non-option.
Either way it will make no difference to the dead ,what we say . Only that we get Justice for those that are wrongfully killed or we may be haunted by the guilt until the Ferryman Cross's the water for our souls.
Having people travel to that country where no traveller returns, does leave one with a sense of loss . Where somebody is missed a sense of loss is real.
Hence they are lost to us temporarily. We are not long behind them.
The greater the pain ,the great the privallage in having shared the orbiting around this Sun with them.
Tempis Fugit

Helol
21st Oct 2018, 15:37
When my dear old mum died, someone remarked to my dad that they hadn't seen her for a while. Dad responded 'She's dead'.

I took my dad's watch to a jewellers to ask them to have a look at it (it had a particular fiddly part on it that made it difficult to change the time on it, or something like that) The jeweller suggested I 'ask the gentleman' how it opened, to which I replied, 'I can't; he's dead' . She was mortified (yes, I know), however I put her at ease by saying it wasn't a problem, and that I didn't mind stating that my dad had 'died', etc.

As someone mentioned above, I notice that pets now 'pass away' and people are 'sorry for your loss' when the pet mouse dies. I am the biggest softy regarding animals, and will probably wear a black arm band for 12 months when my little cats die, but I won't say they 'passed away'. They will die. Just as every living thing does, including us. That said, I do stlll like the 'rainbow bridge' that the animals cross over though :{

The nicest and most thoughtful thing someone said to me when my dad died, wasn't a platitude, or anything like that. It came from an old Italian man, who had known my parents for a long time. He said to me, 'It is the cycle of life, your father has died, and one day you will too, and that is what happens' It wasn't said in a cold way, but it was said by someone who understood death, and was comfortable with it. A super chap.

Super VC-10
21st Oct 2018, 15:57
Not decided yet, should I Cark it, snuff it, kick the bucket, peg out, or something else? When the time comes, that is.

treadigraph
21st Oct 2018, 16:21
I recall that a much treasured British actor penned his own death notice for The Times: "John le Mesurier wishes it to be known that he conked out on..."

Innominate
21st Oct 2018, 17:02
We were having lunch with a couple we hadn't seen for quite a while. I asked [the wife] how her mother was, and she replied "Still dead."

Oops!

Blues&twos
21st Oct 2018, 17:30
Had a chat on the phone with a friend of mine the day after his much-loved father died unexpectedly. He surprised me by saying he'd been in to see 'the corpse' - not an expression you usually hear from a grieving relative. I wonder if he was using the word to force himself to accept the reality of what had happened.

racedo
21st Oct 2018, 17:43
It is people not willing to see dying as part of living.............

Littlies have been to numerous funerals. including seeing open caskets, not going to attempt to shield
them from death as I regard that as part of living.

I have come across people who wouldn't let their kids go to their grandparents funerals as would
be too upsetting........ :ugh:

OTOH when a celebrity whom they never met died they were in mourning.

Innominate
21st Oct 2018, 17:50
When the kids were in their teens a fairly distant cousin died, and I suggested that it would be good for them to go to the funeral, on the basis that their first funeral would not be someone whom they knew well. My son did, but his sister didn't. At their grandmother's funeral my daughter was exrtemely upset at the crematorium and the thought of what was going to happen to grandma.

teeteringhead
21st Oct 2018, 18:27
Still in the hospitalization (another awful one) line, we seem to have lost the distinction between "ill" and "injured". To me the first has always been traumatic, the second pathological (hope I've got those words right.) That always used to be the military classification, although SI, VSI served for both.

I still find it (almost) laughable to hear reports of traffic accidents saying "The driver is seriously ill in hospital".

No he's not - he's seriously injured.

Milady Teeters is having constantly to point out that the telly-folk can't hear my shouts ...........

Flash2001
21st Oct 2018, 19:40
I noticed this effect more than 60 years ago when I read that so-and-so had "Passed away as a result of an accident at a dynamite factory". Thought it was absurd then, still think it's absurd now.

After an excellent landing etc...

ShyTorque
21st Oct 2018, 19:41
My late mother always used the phrase "popped his/her clogs", which always amuses me to hear.

teeteringhead
21st Oct 2018, 21:45
Shy
"popped his/her clogs" I once had the privilege of hearing the Duke of Edinburgh using exactly the same phrase - about himself!

It was during a D of E Gold Award presentation; a number of proud Mums and Dads were wearing their own Gold Award brooches, and HRH was saying - as the Award was then about 50 years old - "I hope some young people will bring their Gold Award grandparents to one of these occasions before I pop my clogs....."

That was a few years ago - about 2010 I guess - so maybe he's had his wish by now.

Dea Certe
21st Oct 2018, 21:52
Gladys and kids, Gladys and the kids, Gladys and the kids are dead dead dead.

hiflymk3
21st Oct 2018, 22:19
Tennysons' inspiration for this poem was a ferry crossing to the Isle of Wight.
https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem/crossing-bar

When I pop me clogs I want my ashes to be scattered on Compton Bay beach, on the Isle of Wight, where I spent the happiest days of my childhood. Tennyson lived in Farringford, less than two miles from that beach.

ShyTorque
21st Oct 2018, 22:26
Shy
I once had the privilege of hearing the Duke of Edinburgh using exactly the same phrase - about himself!

It was during a D of E Gold Award presentation; a number of proud Mums and Dads were wearing their own Gold Award brooches, and HRH was saying - as the Award was then about 50 years old - "I hope some young people will bring their Gold Award grandparents to one of these occasions before I pop my clogs....."

That was a few years ago - about 2010 I guess - so maybe he's had his wish by now.

Sadly, I never had a chance to go for a D of E award of any kind (never heard of the scheme until about thirty years ago) but glad to say that our daughter did us proud with a well earned gold! :ok:

funfly
21st Oct 2018, 23:19
Us old ones have to die to make room for the little ones.

Loose rivets
21st Oct 2018, 23:47
Oscar Wilde Quotes. To lose one parent may be regarded as a misfortune; to lose both looks like carelessness.

lomapaseo
22nd Oct 2018, 02:56
I noticed this effect more than 60 years ago when I read that so-and-so had "Passed away as a result of an accident at a dynamite factory". Thought it was absurd then, still think it's absurd now.

After an excellent landing etc...

or more likely "gone to that place in the sky"

Tankertrashnav
22nd Oct 2018, 10:40
^ ^ ^
:D :D :D

G-CPTN
22nd Oct 2018, 11:26
I have come across people who wouldn't let their kids go to their grandparents funerals as would
be too upsetting........ :ugh:
My grandfather died when I was aged 7.
I was allowed to see him in his open coffin - though I didn't attend his funeral (school day and we lived some distance away).

His death wasn't sudden, so there was no surprise or shock.

parabellum
22nd Oct 2018, 11:59
Down here in Australia they still 'Croak' quite regularly!;)

Pontius Navigator
22nd Oct 2018, 12:38
Funnily enough I was reading s novel last night:

"Dead?'

" Yeah, dead, as in not living " etc etc, almost Monty Python.

cee cee
22nd Oct 2018, 14:03
'fallen asleep'. The latter is cringingly common on headstones of late: "Beloved father and brother, fell asleep on..."


You can blame the bible for that one. All except one reference to "asleep" from Acts onwards refers to death. And it is not because of soft-hearted modern translators, the original word did mean sleep.
https://www.biblegateway.com/quicksearch/?qs_version=NIV&quicksearch=asleep&begin=51&end=73

chuks
22nd Oct 2018, 14:24
“To die, to sleep – to sleep, perchance to dream – ay, there's the rub, for in this sleep of death what dreams may come…” That is Shakespeare's Hamlet, speaking to himself of death, but later, as he is dying, it is that " ... this fell sergeant, death, is strict in his arrest." (A "rub" is a kind of obstacle; "fell" means "fatal.")

I was sat at table once with a multimillionaire who was telling a young girl about Gianni Agnelli, about his fabulous wealth, and his wonderful villa on Capri. I interrupted to point out that Signor Agnelli was not just very, very rich but also very recently very, very dead, no? "Well, yes, but he died with a lot of toys!"

er340790
22nd Oct 2018, 14:41
Defunct. :ok:

Btw, did you hear the one about the Cannibal?

He passed his brother in the street.

nonsense
22nd Oct 2018, 18:19
Sick animals are no longer put down or put to sleep in the press*. They are euthenised.
You're behind the times. Pets "cross the rainbow bridge" nowdays.

topradio
22nd Oct 2018, 18:41
One I like to use a lot is 'he has gone topside' curtesy of Biggles.

Pontius Navigator
22nd Oct 2018, 19:13
'Bought the farm'

I guess the British equivalent is 'Ploughed in'.

Flash2001
22nd Oct 2018, 19:47
I thought "Bought the farm" referred to an aircraft crash, generally by a military pilot in training, after which the government was obliged to purchase the land on which the aircraft the crashed on the (specious) grounds that it was no longer fit for agriculture.

After an excellent landing etc...

visibility3miles
22nd Oct 2018, 22:00
I recently watched news about a pit bull/mixed breed dog that mauled its owner to death.

As video showed police putting the leashed dog into a van, the commentator said, "It is not certain what will happen to the dog."

Nonsense! There was no uncertainty at all that they would "put the dog down," which they did.

Pontius Navigator
22nd Oct 2018, 22:42
Flash, agreed, as in occupied by the one who bought it. 'Bought it' also being a British expression I think as far back at WW1.

racedo
22nd Oct 2018, 23:36
I recently watched news about a pit bull/mixed breed dog that mauled its owner to death.

As video showed police putting the leashed dog into a van, the commentator said, "It is not certain what will happen to the dog."

Nonsense! There was no uncertainty at all that they would "put the dog down," which they did.

No he was not put down he was brought to a nice farm in Kent where he could frolic and live his life in the open air beside the sea.
Tell that to dog lovers and they happy, tell him he got killed and they storm parliment.

lomapaseo
23rd Oct 2018, 01:35
No he was not put down he was brought to a nice farm in Kent where he could frolic and live his life in the open air beside the sea.
Tell that to dog lovers and they happy, tell him he got killed and they storm parliment.

How about we just say he passed, It sounds so much less final than "killed"

DaveReidUK
23rd Oct 2018, 07:47
GER396B6M7w

Pontius Navigator
23rd Oct 2018, 08:52
The sim card on my spare mobile is dead. It didn't die or breathe its last it is just dead. Defunct, doesn't work, expired. Its not passed away, it is still there happy in its slot. Well it would be happy if it worked, but it doesn't. It will be dissected, buried, and allowed to rot and decompose, its little cardboard case returning earth to earth.

Bastard, it owed me £10.

Effluent Man
23rd Oct 2018, 09:08
Pegging. Is the word in our house. Usually accompanied by some sort of text to put the matter into perspective. I can recommend a site called. Deathlist 2018 for pegging related chuckles.

Blues&twos
23rd Oct 2018, 09:18
Bastard, it owed me £10.
My father-in-law is dead. He once lived on a houseboat with Rod Stewart.
The gravel-voiced crooner still owes him a tenner he borrowed in the 1960's.

Ancient Observer
23rd Oct 2018, 17:14
Pushing up daisies.

WingNut60
23rd Oct 2018, 22:28
I have always liked the NZ (Maori??) variant.

"Sucked the kumara"

chuks
24th Oct 2018, 02:42
"Pegging" has got a new meaning; it usually does not mean what you think it does, Effluent Man, not nowadays. Look it up in in the "Urban Dictionary" to see what I mean.

DaveReidUK
24th Oct 2018, 07:39
"Pegging" has got a new meaning; it usually does not mean what you think it does, Effluent Man, not nowadays. Look it up in in the "Urban Dictionary" to see what I mean.

In the sense of dying, it's usually "peg out". You're thinking of pegging in. :O

chuks
24th Oct 2018, 11:49
I guess so ....

I heard about a German Chief Pilot who was being given a hard time by his staff, unruly Brits mostly, who were chafing under their exile someplace East of Suez.

The thing was that that poor German was reduced to speaking English, which he had about as firm a grasp on as matters aeronautical. For one thing he did not understand how to drop "F-bombs," so that sometimes it was just plain "F***" but other times it was "F***ing," getting these basic things all mixed up.

Finally he had enough, so that he exploded, telling the Crew Room that "You think I know f***-nothing! I tell you I know f***-all!"

I think he has passed on; he is no more; he has ceased to be; he has expired and gone to meet his Maker; he is a stiff. Bereft of life, he rests in peace! He is off the twig. He has kicked the bucket; he's shuffled off his mortal coil, run down the curtain and joined the Choir Invisible!! It's now safe for me to tell that story.

Tankertrashnav
24th Oct 2018, 12:33
Good story Chuks, but when I heard it first it involved a Polish master pilot!

I always assumed that "pegging out" came from the game of cribbage where you score with a peg and when the winner places their peg in the final hole it is called pegging out

oxenos
24th Oct 2018, 12:40
In croquet, having run all the hoops, you need to strike the central peg to finish. Always thought that was the origin of "pegging out"

OvertHawk
24th Oct 2018, 12:45
Much amused and at the same time slightly shocked when my ten year old niece, two days after having been gently told that Granny was terminally ill and would not live for much longer calmly asked "So... do we know exactly when Granny is going to kick the bucket?"

treadigraph
24th Oct 2018, 13:41
Good story Chuks, but when I heard it first it involved a Polish master pilot!

I think David Niven had it as a Hollywood film director who hailed from eastern Europe.

Ancient Mariner
24th Oct 2018, 15:02
Speaking of death, we had one cook die on us mid-Atlantic, not popular with us crew as it meant being fed by the chief purser and the second cook, neither up to the task. Deceased cook put in the fish freezer that kept a solid minus 25 C.
New cook, fresh from school join ship somewhere US and was met by two men struggling along the deck with a big parcel wrapped in tarpaulin, they finally gave up and dropped the thing on the deck with a shattering clunk.
Fresh cook inquired about the content and was duly informed that this be the the previous cook who was not up to the job, and this was the result.
Stiff cook had died in his bunk, fresh cook never used it, slept on the couch, and fish was not on the menu for weeks. Not that we missed it.
Per

chuks
24th Oct 2018, 16:58
Are we thinking of Michael Korda, with his "Bring on the empty horses!" (also the title of Niven's novel about Hollywood). Then there was Samuel Goldwyn with "Include me out."

I am disappointed that nobody has felt my collar for theft ... yet.

Flash2001
24th Oct 2018, 20:35
The F-- nothing and F-- all appeared in the voice of a Russian in Nicholas Montserrat's "Cruel Sea". It was modified to D--- nothing and D--- all but we know what he meant.

After an excellent landing etc...