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CoodaShooda
6th Oct 2018, 07:07
A couple of years ago, Ppruners provided me with a lot of information that helped me plan and successfully navigate my first visit to the UK.

Next April/May, my fibre artist wife is attending a 10 day workshop in the New Forest. But she wants to make it a four week visit and is looking to me to make it happen.

I'm allowing four days before the workshop to continue our wanderings around London. I'll also be replicating the last visit by touring aviation and military museums while she's workshopping. However, my firsthand knowledge only extends to the Old Warden, Hendon and Duxford areas.

It's stretching out my 10 days of freedom and then filling the following fortnight that brings me back here seeking further advice.

What areas or or places in England, Scotland and Wales would you recommend for a couple of house trained visitors with interests in History (both), Aviation (more me), Art (more her), Handcrafts (definitely her), Nature (both) and Walking (both, although in my case it may involve hobbling). We aren't considering Ireland on this visit as I need to learn more about our relatives there before dropping in.

All suggestions greatly appreciated.

Bergerie1
6th Oct 2018, 07:46
Try the Wye valley. Wonderful scenary and Tintern Abbey, painted by Turner and many other artists.

https://www.google.fr/search?q=wye+valley&oq=wye+valley&aqs=chrome..69i57j0l5.6184j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

DaveReidUK
6th Oct 2018, 07:52
Salisbury is a popular tourist destination.

Bergerie1
6th Oct 2018, 07:59
DR,

Ha, ha, ha! But the cathedral is well worth seeing.

treadigraph
6th Oct 2018, 08:00
Aviation: Southampton has the Solent Sky museum which includes a Sandringham - very handy for the New Forest. Also the museum at Tangmere, just east of Chichester, which would tie in nicely with a visit to the Boultbee Spitfire operation at Goodwood. Mind you that could lead to a very expensive day if you bought a flight...

Cornwall: my natural bias suggests this wonderful county which ticks all the boxes - St Ives has Tate St Ives and the Barbara Hepworth museum. Nature, history and walking are all well represented and handcrafts aplenty I'm sure. I would include Cornish pasties under handcrafts. :ok:

Lake District: Cornwall plus mountains and minus pasties. Beautiful place.

UniFoxOs
6th Oct 2018, 08:18
A few quick thoughts
When you are in the vicinity there is loads to see at Portsmouth and close by. Victory, Mary Rose, Warrior, WW2 submarine, RM Museum, Fort Nelson, etc. I have been to and can recommend all these. Also within a fairly easy drive while SWMBO is workshopping, Bournemouth Aviation Museum, Museum of Army flying, Farnborough Air Sciences Trust Musem, Solent Sky Museum, etc. Some of these can be a bit variable in interest so best google and check on their websites for days and times of opening and any events.. Not far away Fishbourne Roman Palace is worth a visit

If you are fairly well off and want to show her something different book a night or two at Burgh Island Hotel, in Devon It's not cheap but gives you a chance to stay in a place relatively unchanged from the days when film stars, royalty, racing drivers, aviators and the like stayed there. The island is cut off at high tide. You can drive over at low tide but it always seems to be that you want to either arrive or leave at high tide so you park shoreside and they ferry you over on a "sea tractor" which adds to the interest.

Plenty of other interest along the South Coast. Brixham (replica of Golden Hind (check latest situation as it was for sale earlier in the year), Darmouth and trip up the river Dart, Plymouth, and just inland Dartmoor. And of course Stonehenge (though good for visitors now as in the days when you could walk up to and touch the stones).

PS I see Treadi has already beat me to one or two of these.

Pontius Navigator
6th Oct 2018, 08:27
Downton Abbey - aka High Clere castle off the A34.
Bovington Tank Museum
National Trust - Hidcote Gardens atat Chipping Camden.
Chedworth Roman Villa North of Cirencester.

Cosford Museum.I

Then swing through Wales, plenty of castles. My favour was Caernarfon up north.

If you do the lake district there is a large Roman fort at Hardnott pass. Easily access on foot after an adventurous drive along Wrynose Bottom ☺
​​​​​​

Trossie
6th Oct 2018, 08:30
Old Warden and Duxford (both well worth it!) are quite a 'trek' from the New Forest if you are trying to fit them in then. Added to the advice that you've been given would be the Tank Museum at Bovington (excellent!) and some of the coast near there (Lulworth Cove, Durdle Door, etc.). That's quite a horse riding area too.

That is a nice time to visit with spring colour breaking out (May and June are my favourite months), although expect it to be a lot 'colder' that you would have been used to!

Bergerie1
6th Oct 2018, 08:31
Try Bristol for Brunel's historic ship the 'SS Great Britain'. At a stroke Brunel changed ship construction for ever.

https://www.ssgreatbritain.org/story

Ovation
6th Oct 2018, 08:35
While you're in the UK, why not immerse yourselves in fine British culture: Fawlty Towers Dinner (http://www.torquaysuitetheatre.com/)

Krystal n chips
6th Oct 2018, 08:59
If you fancy a bit of an amble, plus history, have a look at this option .....true, it's in Devon, but, it would be well worth the effort....

Buckfast Abbey, internally alone, plus the grounds is a must. The words tranquil and serene don't appear on reviews with the frequency they do for nothing. Visited the location in July ......beautiful. And it doesn't matter one iota as to having a faith or otherwise, the faith of the Abbey is never over emphasised to visitors. Neither is the gift shop "conveniently located " to force visitors through it as the only exit.

Buckfastleigh and Buckfast Abbey Walking Route (http://www.gps-routes.co.uk/routes/home.nsf/RoutesLinksWalks/buckfastleigh-and-buckfast-abbey-walking-route)

https://www.buckfast.org.uk/

Hydromet
6th Oct 2018, 09:10
Your wife may enjoy the Dansel Gallery (http://www.danselgallery.co.uk) in Abbotsbury, Dorset. It's the best woodwork gallery I've been able to find in the UK.

I also found some pleasant, easy walks in the New Forest.

India Four Two
6th Oct 2018, 09:19
Nobody has mentioned the Fleet Air Arm Museum at Yeovilton and of course, not far away, is Stonehenge.

cavortingcheetah
6th Oct 2018, 09:35
Take the ferry across to the Isle of Wight and see how real islanders live. Refresh yourself with a visit to the home of the Saxe Coburgs at Osborne House. See where Victoria canoodled with Scots bag pipers and Indian exiles. Marvel at the obscure obduracy of the British yachtsman as he bangs his little yacht round some buoy or other in the Solent. Eat wonderful ice cream and take a peek at Bembridge where they used to make Islander aircraft.

Sallyann1234
6th Oct 2018, 10:17
Don't miss Salisbury. Their fine cathedral is well worth visiting. Be sure to take a street map.

treadigraph
6th Oct 2018, 10:25
Don't miss Salisbury. Their fine cathedral is well worth visiting. Be sure to take a street map.
There is some substance to both suggestions for visiting Salisbury, but there is no need to go Russian about...

El Grifo
6th Oct 2018, 11:07
Everyone to whom I have given the suggestion of a couple of nights in Edinburgh have come back to me with glowing reports.
Trully one of the Worlds Great Cities !
El Grifo

paulc
6th Oct 2018, 11:32
Winchester is also worth a visit, roman city, capital before London, impressive cathedral etc

Kerosene Kraut
6th Oct 2018, 11:38
The Shuttleworth collection is outstanding. Best on a summer evening with a picknick and flyby of their oldies.

Tankertrashnav
6th Oct 2018, 11:59
Treadigraph - to add to your remarks about Cornwall there is the Cornwall Aviation Heritage Centre at Newquay (St Mawgan to you and me!) Small but well worth a visit and the staff are very friendly and helpful. Here's a link A fun day out in Newquay Cornwall Aviation Heritage Centre (http://www.cornwallaviationhc.co.uk/)

As regards Tate St Ives, after that I would recommend visiting the Penlee Art Gallery at Penzance. Far less well known than the much-hyped Tate but contains some real pictures (mainly Newlyn School) and will be a welcome relief after the tosh on display at The Tate.

hiflymk3
6th Oct 2018, 12:09
Not far from the New Forest is the Isle of Wight. Take the car ferry from Lymington to Yarmouth. Visit Queen Vics' private pad at Osbourne House, Carisbrooke Castle. For a fresh crab lunch try the Spyglass Inn in Ventnor. Don't forget to turn your watch back 40 years.

Bergerie1
6th Oct 2018, 12:34
If either of you are interested in old buildings this museum is worth a visit.

http://www.wealddown.co.uk/

It's Not Working
6th Oct 2018, 12:45
If it’s art you want nip over the Amsterdam, there’s a direct train now from London to Amsterdam Central (I believe). Amsterdam will give you Van Gogh and the Rijksmuseum plus others then on a train to Den Hague for the Mauritshuis and Vermeer's Girl with the Pearl Earring.

St Ives is awash with Art Galeries, The Tate isn’t to my taste but the Barbra Hepworth museum (think family sized house with garden) most definitely was. Your wife could even book a course at the St Ives School of Art. Don’t go there in the summer school holiday period however, you'll not be able to move.

lomapaseo
6th Oct 2018, 12:57
The wifey is keen on seeing Hadrians Wall while were in Carlisle. I told her that it wasn't worth it as we could see it while training between Newcastle and Carlisle (we don't drive cars in the UK). Now she is all excited again. But what side of the train should we sit and about how many minutes out from Newcastle should we expect to see the remnants of the wall? I should be in trouble if all we see is typical New England style stone fences 3 ft high

Saintsman
6th Oct 2018, 13:00
For the aviation buff in you, the museum at Cosford is well worth a visit because of the unusual aircraft it holds.

Once upon a time, the UK led the way to the skies and there are lots of development aircraft from that time. What is interesting is how many and how quick these aircraft were turned out.

For something different, look up the National Trust website for heritage. There are some impressive buildings to see all over the country with an abundance of history within.

I don't know what your taste in accommodation is like, but for clean, comfortable and very good value, try Premier Inn for short stays. They are all over the place and guarantee you a good night's sleep.

racedo
6th Oct 2018, 13:16
Nobody has mentioned the Fleet Air Arm Museum at Yeovilton and of course, not far away, is Stonehenge.

Yeah was reading and thinking how come nobody had............. good suggestion.

racedo
6th Oct 2018, 13:27
OP

Would take out National Trust /r English Heritage membership for when you are here. A years membership should pay back in reasonable quick time................... they do have shorter membership which worth looking at but need to be clear on intinerary.

I would add in Railway Museums if you interested in all things Mechanical as great one in York, not yet been in one in Oxford.

I would add in Glastonbury as well but be aware of festival time as that would just be a nightmare.

As Aviation related if you popped across the channel for a couple of days could take in Flanders / Somme but also the V1 launching sites in Northern France.
Could realistically do these in 2-3 days and there is a big Australian WW1 memorial at Villers-Bretonneux in the Somme.
There is a grave there of 2 WW2 fliers as well.
Of course given where you are in Hampshire you could take the ferry from Portsmouth, do the D-Day beaches plus Somme etc as well and return via Channel Tunnel / Ferry and use English Heritage membership to visit Dover Castle.

WIDN62
6th Oct 2018, 13:57
Just up the road from the New Forest is the Boscombe Down Aviation Collection at Old Sarum airfield.
Home (http://www.boscombedownaviationcollection.co.uk/index.htm)
At that time of year open 1000-1700 - every day except Mondays.
Also very close are the ruins at Old Sarum and Stonehenge.

treadigraph
6th Oct 2018, 14:01
Miss read that Racedo, thought you had written that they could take in a V2 launch! :)

evansb
6th Oct 2018, 14:47
Visit the Cathedral City of Salisbury and view the cathedral! You may catch a glimpse of a Russian spy carrying out what would appear to be nefarious undertaking. Covert surveillance is fun for the entire family! Don't forget to bring a Polaroid or a Fuji Insta camera, as they are difficult to hack.

Pontius Navigator
6th Oct 2018, 15:01
[Would take out National Trust /r English Heritage membership for when you are here. A years membership should pay back in reasonable quick time................... they do have shorter membership which worth looking at but need to be clear on intinerary.


The NT has reciprocal arrangements with other countries. You might consider check at home and with. NT. To be clear, English Heritage is a separate organisation from NT.

Pontius Navigator
6th Oct 2018, 15:08
If it’s art you want nip over the Amsterdam, there’s a direct train now from London to Amsterdam Central (I believe). Amsterdam will give you Van Gogh and the Rijksmuseum plus others then on a train to Den Hague for the Mauritshuis and Vermeer's Girl with the Pearl Earring.

An alternative to nipping over, consider flying into Amsterdam. Investigate an open-jaw flight, in one air port, out another. So fly into Schipol, then as suggest train to London. You will be at the right time to see the bulb fields.
​​​​

Union Jack
6th Oct 2018, 15:15
Not far from the New Forest is the Isle of Wight. Take the car ferry from Lymington to Yarmouth. Visit Queen Vics' private pad at Osbo(u)rne House, Carisbrooke Castle. For a fresh crab lunch try the Spyglass Inn in Ventnor. Don't forget to turn your watch back 40 years.

.....and be ready for a very expensive ferry ride relative to the short passage! You may also be interested in the National Motor Museum at Beaulieu whilst in the New Forest, and indeed Beaulieu Abbey itself.

Jack

Tankertrashnav
6th Oct 2018, 15:50
The wifey is keen on seeing Hadrians Wall while were in Carlisle. I told her that it wasn't worth it as we could see it while training between Newcastle and Carlisle (we don't drive cars in the UK). Now she is all excited again. But what side of the train should we sit and about how many minutes out from Newcastle should we expect to see the remnants of the wall? I should be in trouble if all we see is typical New England style stone fences 3 ft high

lomopaseo I think your wife would be very disappointed. I travelled this route by rail many times years ago and as far as I can recall there is nothing of the wall visible from the train. It passes not far away from the railway at the Eastern (Newcastle) end, butI do not think there is anything visible. To give you an example, as a youth I lived in Carlisle and crossed the line of the wall almost every day for years without being aware of the fact, as there was absolutely nothing remaining above the surface. Best place to see the wall is at the old Roman fort of Housteads (get a coach trip from Newcastle or Carlisle) where you can actually walk along the wall . https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hadrian%27s_Wall Lots of Roman stuff also on display in Tullie House Museum in Carlisle, and the Norman Castle and Cathedral are also well worth a visit.

oldpax
6th Oct 2018, 15:51
Northumberland and Durham not mentioned!Too much to see there so we are keeping it secret!

chevvron
6th Oct 2018, 16:01
.....and be ready for a very expensive ferry ride relative to the short passage! You may also be interested in the National Motor Museum at Beaulieu whilst in the New Forest, and indeed Beaulieu Abbey itself.

Jack
While you're there, Buckler's Hard too; walkable from the Abbey.

krismiler
6th Oct 2018, 16:05
While you’re in the New Forest, the Beaulieu Motor Museum is worth a visit. Drive around the little villages and enjoy some great country pubs with real beer. Be careful with the ponies, they may kick and bite

Give Southampton a wide swerve, the city center is comparable to a post nuclear apocalypse. Mostly boarded up shops and mutants drinking cider from 2 litre plastic bottles.

Winchester and I.O.W. worth visiting. Northampton is famous for top quality English shoes, and the factory outlets are much cheaper than retail shops.

Nomad2
6th Oct 2018, 16:18
If you are in London, the de Havilland museum at London Colney is really good. They built the prototype Mosquito here, flew it from a field here, and it's still here!

ian16th
6th Oct 2018, 16:19
Northumberland and Durham not mentioned!Too much to see there so we are keeping it secret!

Bowes Museum.

ian16th
6th Oct 2018, 16:24
For the aviation buff in you, the museum at Cosford is well worth a visit because of the unusual aircraft it holds.

Hendon has what you expect it to have.

Cosford has all of the interesting things.

happybiker
6th Oct 2018, 16:40
Sammy Miller's motorcycle museum at Alton in the New Forest is worth a visit likewise the motor museum at Beaulieu.

Krystal n chips
6th Oct 2018, 17:06
For the aviation buff in you, the museum at Cosford is well worth a visit because of the unusual aircraft it holds.

Once upon a time, the UK led the way to the skies and there are lots of development aircraft from that time. What is interesting is how many and how quick these aircraft were turned out.

For something different, look up the National Trust website for heritage. There are some impressive buildings to see all over the country with an abundance of history within.

I don't know what your taste in accommodation is like, but for clean, comfortable and very good value, try Premier Inn for short stays. They are all over the place and guarantee you a good night's sleep.

True, Premier Inn are an improvement on Travel Lodge, there again, so would a WW2 Nissen hut be, but be careful when booking. They are quite fond of the old "only two rooms left ! " trick after you make the initial search and, guess what, the price will have increased as well. But if you can get the room / deal at the time to suit you, then they are pretty reasonable overall. Alternatively, a bit of searching can reveal some pretty good Bed n Breakfast outlets in some locations

But whatever you do, don't go near a Motorway services hotel for the night...like the rest of the facilities, they have a notable mark up on prices, same as the fuel.

Bergerie1
6th Oct 2018, 17:14
And also on the Beaulieu River, Buckler's Hard where Nelson's HMS Agamemnon was built.

https://www.bucklershard.co.uk/

Tankertrashnav
6th Oct 2018, 18:02
Northumberland and Durham not mentioned!Too much to see there so we are keeping it secret!

Quite right oldpax. Mrs TTN and I had a great holiday in the wilds of Durham A bit like North Yorks except that the locals don't keep banging on about what a wonderful place it is! And as a former Cumbrian resident I shock my old pals there by saying I much prefer Northumberland to the Lake District - not swamped with people and cars, and no mountains to block the view!

G-CPTN
6th Oct 2018, 18:12
The only way to see any of Hadrian's Wall is by bus (or car) - the railway doesn't go anywhere near the Wall except at Gilsland - and there is no longer a station there.
Milecastle 48 (https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place/Milecastle+48-+Hadrian's+Wall/@54.9892377,-2.5740039,188m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m13!1m7!3m6!1s0x487d09c6532c4ca3:0xeb7c03edd8 398f97!2sGilsland,+Brampton+CA8+7BJ!3b1!8m2!3d54.990102!4d-2.572867!3m4!1s0x487da71acff18669:0xa4f9471dd68a3a99!8m2!3d5 4.9890203!4d-2.5735018)

The 685 bus from Newcastle to Carlisle will pass the ruins of the Wall at
Denton (https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place/Denton+Burn,+Newcastle+upon+Tyne+NE15+7TA/@54.9836318,-1.6871199,760m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m5!3m4!1s0x487e77afd15a63a5:0x3f3bba2412db92f 3!8m2!3d54.9811574!4d-1.6905803)
and also at
Heddon (https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place/Heddon-on-the-Wall/@54.9964805,-1.7876917,192m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m5!3m4!1s0x487dd8558cfac895:0x2622fbb22acf1f7 b!8m2!3d54.998474!4d-1.802084) - but you will almost certainly not recognise them.
If you are visiting between Easter and September, there is a dedicated AD122 (https://www.gonortheast.co.uk/ad122/) bus that runs from Hexham (bus station and railway station) to Haltwhistle station, calling at all of the worthwhile Roman sites along the Wall - with the appropriate ticket you can get off and rejoin at any (and all) of the stops.

pzu
6th Oct 2018, 20:58
YORK - Yes it’s in Yorkshire!!! ONLY 2 hrs by train from London,
Home of the National Rail Museum
site of the ‘Minster’ one of the finest religious sites in the UK
site of the ‘Shambles’ olde worlde shopping
close proximity to Yorkshire Air Museum home of Halifax ‘Friday the 13th’ and Air Gunners Exhibition
Yorkshire Air Museum - The Largest Independent Air Museum in the UK
site of various Roman and Viking exhibits
York Races first meeting mid May
ttps://www.yorkracecourse.co.uk/news-2019-racing-fixture-details--1.html
and ‘Tour de Yorkshire’ 2nd - 5th May
https://letour.yorkshire.com/tour-de-yorkshire-ride

Could fill a few hours
PZU- Out of Africa (Retired)

cubemaster
6th Oct 2018, 21:15
The 'Messums Wiltshire' art gallery at Tisbury tithe barn has some unusual art. It's about 10 miles west of Salisbury, mainly photographic but some sculptures. I fitted it in between Stonehenge and the Army museum of flying last weekend.
if you're planning to visit a few English heritage sites like Stonehenge then the annual membership is a must, two adults at Stonehenge is about £40 which is just under half the membership price for a couple.

evansb
6th Oct 2018, 21:21
If visiting Newcastle, bring coal.

If visiting Birmingham, bring a Hijab.

racedo
6th Oct 2018, 21:46
If visiting Newcastle, bring coal.

If visiting Birmingham, bring a Hijab..

London a knife..................... or is that too soon ?

CoodaShooda
7th Oct 2018, 00:42
Thank you all for the fantastic response. I'm now wondering about my chances of winning the lottery and making the four week visit a four month stay. :O

woptb
7th Oct 2018, 00:53
The National Museum in Cardiff has a fantastic art collection. Cardiff castle & Bute park & Castell Coch (a Victorian fairytale castle) & St Fagans National Museum of History. All worth spending time in & Cardiff is a cosmopolitan port city + good places to eat & stay & relatively cheap!

artee
7th Oct 2018, 02:08
Thank you all for the fantastic response. I'm now wondering about my chances of winning the lottery and making the four week visit a four month stay. :O



You could look at The Landmark Trust (https://www.landmarktrust.org.uk/) - you get to stay in some unique and historic places - like Luttrell's Tower at Eaglehurst:

https://cimg5.ibsrv.net/gimg/pprune.org-vbulletin/450x321/luttrells_exterior_main_450x321_6a50d55f23430149b6696b755ca9 0c5bc8c9de7c.jpg

"This is an exceptionally fine Georgian folly with a grandstand view of all the passing maritime activity on the Solent, with Cowes and the Isle of Wight beyond."

Close to the New Forest - handy for Beaulieu and Buckler's Hard. It's also where Marconi's wife watched the Titanic pass.

Bon voyage!

India Four Two
7th Oct 2018, 02:55
If either of you are interested in old buildings this museum is worth a visit.

http://www.wealddown.co.uk/

+1 I agree. :ok:

Krystal n chips
7th Oct 2018, 05:45
The National Museum in Cardiff has a fantastic art collection. Cardiff castle & Bute park & Castell Coch (a Victorian fairytale castle) & St Fagans National Museum of History. All worth spending time in & Cardiff is a cosmopolitan port city + good places to eat & stay & relatively cheap!

This is probably a bit of a long shot, but, if you do find yourself anywhere near Cardiff, a trip up the road to this place would be well worth the journey....
It's obviously been cleaned up a bit underground but that's about it because once you are down there, you really do get to appreciate the conditions the miners worked in plus the surface exhibits have no faux sentimentality about life as it was for a miner. The guides are great, real people and former miners with a great sense of humour to add to the visit.

https://museum.wales/bigpit/

Pontius Navigator
7th Oct 2018, 08:30
Agree about the Wealdon, not too far is the Blue bell line railway.

​​​A cousin from NZ and her partner came for a protracted tour. They flew into Manchester and bought a car. I don't know how they got the deal but he bought it back at near the same price.

The Nr Fairy
7th Oct 2018, 08:58
From the New Forest there's plenty to do.

And if you visit Stonehenge, be sure to think about including Woodhenge, Silbury Hill and Avebury in your itinerary. There's also a 2 hour, 6 mile circular walk from Avebury with a team room at the end to wrap things up with!

Mr Optimistic
7th Oct 2018, 10:50
I was going to suggest Arundel but guess wrong time of year for the gardens.
If you go to York be sure to take plenty of cash in low denomination notes and coin: the locals seem to think all tourists are mobile ATMs.

Tankertrashnav
7th Oct 2018, 11:46
Oh and don't bring £50 notes - they are a damn nuisance. When I had an antique shop you could always tell overseas visitors as they often offered £50s which are regarded with deep suspicion because of the possibility of them being forgeries. Ask for nothing higher than £20 when ordering your £sterling (or GBP to use the modern, inaccurate term).

racedo
7th Oct 2018, 12:18
Oh and don't bring £50 notes - they are a damn nuisance. When I had an antique shop you could always tell overseas visitors as they often offered £50s which are regarded with deep suspicion because of the possibility of them being forgeries. Ask for nothing higher than £20 when ordering your £sterling (or GBP to use the modern, inaccurate term).

Er Don't bring more than 2 days cash, use credit / debit cards as get a better rate.

Gertrude the Wombat
7th Oct 2018, 12:37
You could look at The Landmark Trust (https://www.landmarktrust.org.uk/) - you get to stay in some unique and historic places
Though sometimes with a very long waiting list.

Actually the last night I spent in a Landmark, last December, involved booking exactly 0 days in advance. This was Fort Clonque, and on the day we were due to leave the planes weren't running (too much crosswind), so not only could we not get home but also anyone else who might have booked the fort that night couldn't get to the island.

Not only did we get an extra night free (Landmark never asked us to pay for it) but also

the pub, which didn't normally do food on Mondays, called in a chef to cook lunch for us
the museum, which doesn't normally open in the winter, was opened up for us

so I think us bunch of stranded travellers was quite famous on the island that day.

Chronus
7th Oct 2018, 19:41
Oxford is a must. The Bodlian library, the University colleges and all that they represent are magnificent. No place anywhere like it in the world. Oxford most certainly played a very important part in putting the Great in Britain. What nation can be Great without great leaders.

dastocks
7th Oct 2018, 20:19
An alternative to nipping over, consider flying into Amsterdam. Investigate an open-jaw flight, in one air port, out another. So fly into Schipol, then as suggest train to London. You will be at the right time to see the bulb fields.
​​​​
It's a direct train from London to Amsterdam but on the way back you have to clear Immigration/Customs in Brussels and catch the train from there.

Pontius Navigator
7th Oct 2018, 20:31
Chelsea Flower Show third week of May.

racedo
7th Oct 2018, 21:28
It's a direct train from London to Amsterdam but on the way back you have to clear Immigration/Customs in Brussels and catch the train from there.

errrrrr Brexit could have different viewpoint on this.

netstruggler
8th Oct 2018, 11:07
Well if you like history then, The Ceremony of the Keys (https://changing-guard.com/ceremony-of-the-keys.html). Performed every evening for the last 700 years in the Tower of London.

You have to book in advance, but it only costs £1.

Trossie
8th Oct 2018, 12:48
errrrrr Brexit could have different viewpoint on this.
CoodaShooda (https://www.pprune.org/members/35081-coodashooda), Don't pay too much attention to any doom-and-gloom stories about Immigration from Remoaners! They come out with unsubstantiated sound-bites!

There have been comments recommending York and I'll 'second' those. A quick and pleasant train ride from London (as you're going to be there at some stage anyway). Book early and avoid 'peak' times and you can get good prices, even for first class (use National Rail Enquiries - Official source for UK train times and timetables (http://www.nationalrail.co.uk/) for any rail travel planning and 'search around' the times a bit for good prices). York is an absolute treasure! The only city that you can still walk along the top of the old medieval walls all the way around the city; York Minster is well worth a visit; the old medieval streets (including the 'Shambles') are a delight; if you have only the slightest interests in railways the National Railway Museum is a 'must'. And in April the daffodils should still be out on the wall's embankments.And then 'on the doorstep' is the Yorkshire Dales and 'James Herriot country'.

From York it's only just over two hours on the train to Edinburgh -- another well worthwhile visit.

And I'll 'second' that comment on the Ceremony of the Keys too. But you might need to look into that one very, very soon for next April!

treadigraph
8th Oct 2018, 13:22
If you go to York and like a real ale, try the Blue Bell - beers and ciders are excellent, plus this tiny pub has a nice snack sideline in the shape of pork pies. We found ourselves staying for a second round of pie, might as well have another pint then... Go when it's quiet though!

ian16th
8th Oct 2018, 13:29
Agree with all said about York.

But, there is a warning, whatever you do, don't try and get there with a car!

funfly
8th Oct 2018, 22:33
If visiting Newcastle, bring coal.,If visiting Birmingham, bring a Hijab.

You will notice that many of the natives still retain the views from our "Empire Days"

FF

Tankertrashnav
9th Oct 2018, 18:18
racedo If you go back far enough there were direct trains between Harwich and Zeebrugge, and as far as I recall passport/customs formalities were carried out on the train. Must have been fascinating watching the carriages being loaded on and off the ferries, And all this long before the Common Market/EEC/EU!

Train Ferry Service | Harwich & Dovercourt | History, Facts & Photos of Harwich (http://www.harwichanddovercourt.co.uk/train-ferry-service/)

Trossie
9th Oct 2018, 20:36
I'll second what ian16th says about cars and York. That's why I suggested getting there by train. Ditto Edinburgh.

London, York and Edinburgh are three places that you do not want to go into by car. Fortunately they are also three places that you don't need a car.

CoodaShooda
9th Oct 2018, 22:52
Once again, my thanks for all your kind replies.

Coincidentally, on the day York was first mentioned here, we had been watching a TV documentary linking its past with the present. Watching the presenter wander around the streets, I was wondering how you'd get a car in there. I now see that the answer is "you don't".

G-CPTN
9th Oct 2018, 23:35
York is surrounded by free park-and-ride carparks from which you can travel into the centre at reasonable cost by dedicated buses.

Ken Borough
10th Oct 2018, 10:10
Cooda,

Wot G-CPTN said. Apart from Park 'n Ride, there are commercial car parks relatively close to the city centre. There's so much to see in York that you'll need more than a couple of days. The Yorkshire Air Museum at Elvington will consume at least half a day while the National Rail Museum could eat a day. A walk around the Wall will take a few hours with stops for rubber-necking. It's a great not-to-be-missed city.

Pontius Navigator
10th Oct 2018, 11:35
You have such a great spread of suggestions that you are going to need some fine planning to minimise travel time and maximise tour time. You will also need to plan your clothing too. Good, stout waterproof shoes will be a must. The weather is very changeable and you won't have the time to sit out bad weather. Layer clothing will be the best with lightweight windproof waterproofs and then lighter clothing and woolens under. Friends from NZ underestimated the cold, wet and wind and had to buy additional clothing.

G-CPTN
10th Oct 2018, 12:07
had to buy additional clothing.
Not a bad policy - you cannot anticipate the weather.
Why carry clothes that you won't need? - best to buy locally and then either dump them (or give them away to a homeless person).
Money takes up less space than clothing (and weighs less).
There are always 'economy' shops - even charity shops . . .

Pontius Navigator
10th Oct 2018, 13:06
The problem with economy shops like Primark is you will want to buy more than you need☺

Easiest way, apart from a bin, to dispose of nearly new clothes is a charity shop. Every High Street has at least two.

CoodaShooda
10th Oct 2018, 13:23
Good points gentlemen.

My wardrobe is rather limited when it comes to cold weather gear. (Cold, in our case is 15C. Freezing is 13C.)

I've managed to survive visits to Tasmania (max temp 10) and Enzed in Autumn recently. But I may need backup as this is a longer trip and, if the Kiwis find it cold and wet.........:eek: Charity shops it is. With everything to be donated back before departure.

Krystal n chips
10th Oct 2018, 13:33
You have such a great spread of suggestions that you are going to need some fine planning to minimise travel time and maximise tour time. You will also need to plan your clothing too. Good, stout waterproof shoes will be a must. The weather is very changeable and you won't have the time to sit out bad weather. Layer clothing will be the best with lightweight windproof waterproofs and then lighter clothing and woolens under. Friends from NZ underestimated the cold, wet and wind and had to buy additional clothing.

Ah. yes, buuut, since you've described the perfect summers day in Lincolnshire ( other Counties exist in the UK by the way ) and lets face it, when it's an Easterly (ish ) wind remind us again of what's between Lincs and the Ural's, not forgetting the aroma of over cooked stale fried onions combined with silage wafting on the breeze from Skegness, then the above would be relevant.

As it is, while we don't know Cooda's travel plans, it's possibly a fair bet to say he and his wife won't be risking the counties infamous undertaker sponsored roads for their entire stay in the UK

Trossie
10th Oct 2018, 14:22
CoodaShooda, You will find April to be 'freezing' and May to be 'cold'! And on a sunny day with no wind at 14C you will find everyone here saying "Nice day"!! (Remember that they've just come out of several months of winter! Coming straight from your summer it will be a shock if you're not prepared.)


Pontius Navigator is totally correct when he says "Good, stout waterproof shoes will be a must". The ground will be wet and (to you) cold. Cold and wet feet are a good way of ending up miserable (and ill?) Good socks too. You can't go wrong with a pair of waterproof hiking boots and socks, as even in cities you will do a lot of walking. Don't pack them, wear them onto and off the flight (and for obvious reasons, keep them on an laced up to take-off and landing), they would add too much to your baggage weight.

A good light-weight, preferably breathable, waterproof jacket is a very, very good idea. Other than that, dress warmly in layers so that you can 'peel off' or add on as needed. Indoors tends to be kept rather warm (or probably 'comfortably cool' for you?) so you don't want to be overdressed when going in and out. You might find that a good scarf, hat ('beanie') and gloves would go down well too. Charity shops might have quite a bit at that time of the year that 'locals' are starting to discard that might suit you just right.

But whatever you do, keep those feet warm and dry!!

I was told by an elderly relative once that there is absolutely nothing nicer than a good English spring day. I agree with him. (He was very English though, and from practical experience I would like to add that the same applies to Wales and Scotland, although delay your timing for about a month for Scotland!)

Oh, and if you do drive here, the roads are very 'different' but exceptionally safe. And we drive on the correct side of the road!

CoodaShooda
10th Oct 2018, 22:46
Thanks again. We will be buying suitable footwear asap, so we can wear them in before the trip.

Our summer is our Wet Season with temperatures in the mid-30's, humidity around 100% and monsoonal rains. We sit and watch the mould growing on our walls. The British Isles in spring, despite its vagaries, will be a welcome relief. :D

That you drive on the correct side and speak a comprehensible language are two major attractions for this unseasoned traveller. On my last (first) visit my GPS failed as I drove out of the Heathrow T5 car park and, the next day, it and the back-up I'd arranged offered conflicting directions. I survived that. So I'm returning with a bit of confidence on the driving front.

Pontius Navigator
11th Oct 2018, 16:42
I mentioned Hardknot Pass, as it happens one of our papers today mentioned it as one of the best driving roads in the country:

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/travel_news/article-6264411/The-UKs-best-driving-roads-revealed.html

It is definitely not a high speed autoroute :)