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gemma10
1st Oct 2018, 23:35
Last November I signed up with Eon for dual fuels. Recently they have advised me they could save me even more if I stay with them this November. The argument states that they will save me 91 on electricity and 155 on gas if I move my tarriff to "x" but if I do nothing at all, my tariff will change to "y" and I will save nothing at all because it will be a variable tariff.

Why O why are they just not putting customers on the lowest tariff anyway. I thought the goverment had mandated this recently, but it doesn`t seem to be set in stone.

Even if I opt for the lowest and cheapest tariff, there is absolutely nothing to prevent them from increasing said ammount during the year as has happened earlier this year. I am finding the whole damn issue a complete minefield, and am none the wiser from even the Martin Lewis`s website, who claim to offer even cheaper deals.

Some of the utilities offer cheaper tariffs but higher standing charges and some offer higher charges and with lower standing charges.

Two tariffs should be the order of the day, one for domestic and one for business. Any help greatly recieved.:ugh:

racedo
1st Oct 2018, 23:40
Went to Utility Warehouse years ago for everything including Broadband and Mobiles................ seen nothing to regret that decision.

G0ULI
2nd Oct 2018, 00:46
All utility prices ultimately devolve back to being directly linked to the cost of a barrel of oil in US dollars. If the exchange rate varies, the utility prices vary. If the oil price varies, the utility price varies.

So there is a basic level below which prices will not fall. So how is it that a middleman company can offer to supply your domestic utilities cheaper than the original source supplier? Well, that is done by agreeing a fixed price contract for a large amount of gas, water, electricity, phone signals, etc, at a commercial rate and selling to the end consumer at a domestic rate.

Individual consumers just don't have the clout to negotiate prices with suppliers. So you end up with the ridiculous system where a company that produces nothing, negotiates a bulk deal and then supplies the product through the original suppliers infrastucture, in many cases, and this is supposed to save money for the consumer?

This will not end well.

Pontius Navigator
2nd Oct 2018, 09:56
Gemma, you said increasing the amount later in the year. I am sure a fixed tariff will not change, it is the monthly payment that will change. This might not be what you mean but it does confuse many people.

If you know your annual consumption for gas and electricity then it is possible to arrive at an accurate monthly payment. My previous supplier (not bust) at our last home set out monthly payment at about the same as our earlier supplier and, despite promises, never reduced it. When we left we eventually got a large refund.

New home, new build, and no energy history, our new supplier set the monthly payment. Now they only require a 6 monthly meter reading but I submit one every month. They immediately reduced my payment but I am still building a small credit. Now we are approaching cooler weather I expect my consumption to increase. If I now wait 6 months I would expect a big increase.

G-CPTN
2nd Oct 2018, 10:17
Two days ago the price for diesel fuel at our village pump was 135.99.
The following day it was 134.99.
Today it is 136.99.

Pontius Navigator
2nd Oct 2018, 10:42
Two days ago the price for diesel fuel at our village pump was 135.99.
The following day it was 134.99.
Today it is 136.99.
Which brings the conundrum, how far to travel to save 7p/l. 15 mile trip would cost me about 2l. Say a buy of 40l to break even.
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gemma10
2nd Oct 2018, 11:37
PN I understand what you are saying, let me put the current year another way. Last November I opted for a fixed tariff, and whilst not using any more gas or electric than the previous year, in March this year they upped the monthly installment by 14 which I still pay. The forecast to this November is I will use approx the same as previous.

Expatrick
2nd Oct 2018, 11:59
. Some of the utilities offer cheaper tariffs but higher standing charges and some offer higher charges and with lower standing charges.

Rule of thumb was always, high user go for high standing charge low unit rate, low user, other way round - assuming the supplier offers the option.

Not worth quoting Hungarian tariffs except to say that our gas bill (90 m apartment with 3.3 m ceilings) is equiv. 35 pcm & our electricity bill 27 pcm - & in winter we really use our heating.

More importantly our meters are read each year without fail, monthly payments have been reduced & refunds given - without asking. (Our original bills when we moved here were 60 & 40 respectively).

Pontius Navigator
2nd Oct 2018, 17:19
PN I understand what you are saying, let me put the current year another way. Last November I opted for a fixed tariff, and whilst not using any more gas or electric than the previous year, in March this year they upped the monthly installment by 14 which I still pay. The forecast to this November is I will use approx the same as previous.
Fair enough but you don't say if you were in credit come March. If you were then you should have had the option of asking to remain at the original payment. If, OTOH, you were in debit then the increase would reduce that debit and anticipate the future debit.