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Hempy
1st Oct 2018, 15:21
“The 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine has been awarded jointly to James P. Allison and Tasuku Honjo “for their discovery of cancer therapy by inhibition of negative immune regulation.””

https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/medicine/2018/press-release

Lonewolf_50
1st Oct 2018, 15:47
I think your title is a bit overoptimistic. Cancer is hardly cured, but those two and their associates in Houston and Kyoto are certainly bringing a lot of upside to the fight against Cancer. Bit tip of the cap to them, and I think well deserved.

Bob Lenahan
2nd Oct 2018, 16:02
Met a medical doctor I know on a vacation at the beach. Asked him about cancer. Maybe 15 years ago. He said cancer is curable, but the gummit won't allow it because there's too much money invested in the treatments. ?????

Talked to my family doctor a few years back. He said that if you are cancer prone (my words), you will die from cancer. If you aren't, you will die from something else.

Thoughts???
Bob

Captivep
2nd Oct 2018, 16:18
So, the government (presumably all of them) won't allow cancer to be cured because there's too much money invested in the treatments to cure cancer? Eh?

A conspiracy theory rather close to the one that says the oil companies know how to run engines on water but won't do it because of their profits.

On the other hand, I believe it's accepted that some people have a genetic disposition to one form of cancer or another.

WingNut60
2nd Oct 2018, 16:26
On the other hand......


https://img-s-msn-com.akamaized.net/tenant/amp/entityid/AAvFaZ2.img?h=40&w=138&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f&f=png (http://www.smh.com.au/) Cervical cancer set to be eliminated from Australia in global first


Cervical cancer is set to become a rare disease in Australia within just two years and rendered so uncommon by 2028 it will be deemed eliminated as a public health problem for the first time anywhere in the world.

DaveReidUK
2nd Oct 2018, 16:49
Talked to my family doctor a few years back. He said that if you are cancer prone (my words), you will die from cancer. If you aren't, you will die from something else.

Hmmm. A doctor who reckons that all his patients will eventually die.

He's no fool.

wiggy
2nd Oct 2018, 17:35
Met a medical doctor I know on a vacation at the beach. Asked him about cancer. Maybe 15 years ago. He said cancer is curable, but the gummit won't allow it because there's too much money invested in the treatments. ?????

Tinfoil hat stuff IMHO.

Talked to my family doctor a few years back. He said that if you are cancer prone (my words), you will die from cancer.

Well if one (or both) of your parents suffered from cancer genetics come into play and I guess you might be more “cancer prone”.... and it therefore might be worth getting any appropriate screening...worked for me....

Those are my thoughts.

lomapaseo
2nd Oct 2018, 18:25
Hmmm. A doctor who reckons that all his patients will eventually die.

He's no fool.

statistically No way of him proving that claim

Mac the Knife
2nd Oct 2018, 18:28
Cancer is not a single disease but a multiplicity of diseases

I suggest readers dump the cancer conspiracy theory where it belongs: cancer is as old as mankind.

Some families DO carry a gene or condition that may predispose them to a particular form of cancer (e.g. BRCA1 or BRCA2 for breast cancer) OR other genes or conditions that predispose then to other types of cancer.

We now know that some HPV variants predispose some people to cervical Ca. It appears that HPV vaccination of a sufficient number of of pre-menarcheal girls (and boys), will reduce the incidence of cervical Ca very significantly, but NOT eliminate it (in Australia or anywhere).

The discovery that the presence of the common helicobacter pylori in the stomach is a major cause of gastroduodenal ulcer in a significant number of people has radically changed the treatment of peptic ulcer. Most can now be cured by antibiotics that eliminate H. pylori (for a while), or drastically lower gastric acid secretion (the proton-pump inhibitors), reducing the need for gastric surgery. There is good evidence that this markedly reduces the incidence of gastric cancers.

There is now increasing evidence that there are "good" cancers, which can be "cured" (i.e. very long survivals) with appropriate treatment and "bad" cancers, which respond poorly to the best current treatments and which will eventually kill the patient. The problem is that we do not have, for the most part, reliable ways of differentiating the two.

Personally I believe that with the extraordinary recent advances in genomic therapy, more and more cancers will move into the "good" category but, sadly, for the foreseeable future, some will remain unresponsive and continue to kill patients.

Science is incremental rather than miraculous, so we will have to wait awhile.

Mac

PS: Just as serious, IMHO is the seemingly uncontrollable population growth in the Third World, to which I have no answers.

racedo
2nd Oct 2018, 22:07
If you cure all Cancers..................... what will people die of ?

It would be great if everybody lived to 100 or would it be ?

WingNut60
2nd Oct 2018, 22:19
...........

We now know that some HPV variants predispose some people to cervical Ca. It appears that HPV vaccination of a sufficient number of of pre-menarcheal girls (and boys), will reduce the incidence of cervical Ca very significantly, but NOT eliminate it (in Australia or anywhere).

PS: Just as serious, IMHO is the seemingly uncontrollable population growth in the Third World, to which I have no answers.

The body of the SMH article was much more realistic.
It said "...will be deemed eliminated as a public health problem" and went on to give predicted statistics of, like 3 / 1,000,000, or similar by 2088.
No real claim for complete elimination.

Re your PS - I'm with you.
I firmly believe that every one of the worlds major problems can be linked back to over-population.
Soylent Green all over again.

WingNut60
2nd Oct 2018, 22:22
If you cure all Cancers..................... what will people die of ?

It would be great if everybody lived to 100 or would it be ?

Whomever has aspirations of living to 100 should take a good look in a aged-care facility.

racedo
2nd Oct 2018, 22:27
Whoever has aspirations of living to 100 should take a good look in a aged-care facility.

Come from genes where longevity appears to engrained. In family trees found relatives living to 70-80 in 19th century.
I have 5 immediate relatives who got to 90 or above, 3 still living.

WingNut60
2nd Oct 2018, 22:32
Come from genes where longevity appears to engrained. In family trees found relatives living to 70-80 in 19th century.
I have 5 immediate relatives who got to 90 or above, 3 still living.

Yes, but it's not just about longevity.
Quality of life counts too.

For the few who make it to 100 or more and still in reasonable shape, good on 'em.
But they're not the majority.
My brother-in-law died recently at 90. Was in good shape up until about two years ago.
Went down hill very quickly after that.

racedo
2nd Oct 2018, 22:51
Yes, but it's not just about longevity.
Quality of life counts too.

For the few who make it to 100 or more and still in reasonable shape, good on 'em.
But they're not the majority.
My brother-in-law died recently at 90. Was in good shape up until about two years ago.
Went down hill very quickly after that.

All in 90's were in decent health for age, living at home.
Oldest one got to 99 this year but had family looking after him for the last year but he was still able to be up and about
and knew who people were.

WingNut60
2nd Oct 2018, 23:13
There is no doubt that people are not only living longer, but are living healthily longer.
At least in most of the west. And that's provided the obesity gene doesn't get you.

racedo
2nd Oct 2018, 23:45
And that's provided the obesity gene doesn't get you.

So true................. after spending 15 years putting the Kgs on I made conscious decision
over last 12 months to get rid of them.
Bit more exercise (not a lot though), eating a lot better and less Soda's / Chocolate and Crisps 7-8 kgs later
I am where was 15 years ago.......................... biggest investment was Weighing Scales, use
most mornings as gives you an idea for the day.

Thomas coupling
2nd Oct 2018, 23:53
It's not just the genetic input is it? We are expoed to all sorts of environmental dangers ranging from smoking (active and passive), car fumes, toxic chemicals, processed foods, etc etc.
I read somewhere that the vast majority of cancers are caused by these leaving genetic factors in their trail.
Having said that, as our longevity extends - genetic cancers will gain traction more and more, I guess.

Obesity - has anyone read any research to compare the burden "dimensionally challeneged" people pose on our services, Vs them dying sooner and relieving the NHS of such burdens?
I think smokers and drinkers and obese people are god's way of introducing a level playing field!

India Four Two
3rd Oct 2018, 07:20
biggest investment was Weighing Scales, use
most mornings as gives you an idea for the day.

I'm with you, racedo. I bought a set of accurate digital scales and I significantly reduced my calorie intake, by just eating less and more healthily. Not much more exercise, but I've lost 8 Kg (1St 3.5lb in old money) since March. The psychological effect of seeing one smaller Kg number on the scale is fantastic. I'm now down to a weight that allows me to fly all my club's gliders, WITH a parachute.

Still a way to go to meet my target, but I've just been given a new incentive - an invitation to fly a Christen Eagle next Spring!

davews
3rd Oct 2018, 10:31
As a prostate cancer sufferer I consider myself all but cured, but the consultants can only say 'in remission'. Whatever, survival rates from some cancers are very good nowadays.
Going back to the Nobel prize, Southampton University has done a lot of research into immunology for cancer treatment and recently opened a big centre for it - Google for Southampton Cancer Centre (it seems I am not allowed to post URLs). As a former student there - many years ago - I have supported this initiative.

Hydromet
3rd Oct 2018, 11:03
On my maternal Grandmother's side there is a distinct line where the men all died in their 50s from sudden heart attacks (including my father & uncle) and the women did the same, only 30 years older. On my mother's side, everyone seems to die from cancers in their 80s or older. I was hoping to cop the sudden heart attack late in life. No doubt I'll find out sooner or later.

Thomas coupling
3rd Oct 2018, 11:12
davews - congrats buddy and keep at it!
Hydromet - why don't you grip this issue and do as much as you can to ameliorate the "inevitable"?

racedo
3rd Oct 2018, 11:31
I'm with you, racedo. I bought a set of accurate digital scales and I significantly reduced my calorie intake, by just eating less and more healthily. Not much more exercise, but I've lost 8 Kg (1St 3.5lb in old money) since March.

:D:D

Know that feeling, still miss a steak now and again but still indulge occaionally.
One of the kids said at weekend, "You are not as cuddly as you were"................... they didn't understand my grin.


The psychological effect of seeing one smaller Kg number on the scale is fantastic.


On my birthday my weight went under a psychological number I had in my head, that was good.

I don't claim I am on a diet as would struggle keeping to it, more like a goal to achieve but still enjoying food.

cattletruck
3rd Oct 2018, 11:32
Having worked in the "cancer industry" for 4 years I could write a thesis on the things I'd seen and experienced. However let me surmise it all in a couple of sentences.
There are only a small number of properly qualified places/people that really know their stuff and only dish out factual information.
There are a lot of places/people qualified or not that dish out a lot of misinformation and plenty of wishful thinking.

Thomas coupling
3rd Oct 2018, 18:19
That's helpful Cattletruck (not)!

cattletruck
5th Oct 2018, 11:45
I guess what I'm trying to say is that in the moment of your most vulnerability, unless you know someone who you can trust with their advice which is based on experience then you're going to have to learn the hard way.

It's really sad that some people make a business out of cancer, or rather other peoples suffering, but that's how it is unfortunately.

funfly
5th Oct 2018, 23:02
We die in order to make room for more.

I think that many people of my age are well aware of the impending fact.

At the moment quite well but deteriorating a bit. I am not afraid of death but I don't really want it too soon and I don't want it to hurt.

I do wonder that if I pop my clogs how will I post the fact on here?

cavuman1
6th Oct 2018, 02:32
And then you die!

I am right with you, funfly, though you superannuate me by a mere decade. Were we not twenty-five years of age just last week?

As Woody Allen said: "I'm not afraid of dying. I just don't want to be there when it happens..."

Concur!

- Ed :E

treadigraph
6th Oct 2018, 08:13
Were we not twenty-five years of age just last week?

Young lad complaining in the pub a couple of weeks ago about having to show proof of age. "I'm 23 for god's sake!". He did look very young and I said to him "enjoy it while it lasts, 50 will come much quicker than you think..."