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jez d
24th Sep 2018, 14:55
Is there a reason why the word 'propaganda' has been binned in preference for the phrase 'fake news', or is there a distinction between the two that I'm missing ?

WingNut60
24th Sep 2018, 15:23
Because this generation can not understand words of more than two syllables.
And some American presidents, apparently.

dook
24th Sep 2018, 15:29
Because this generation can not understand words of more than two syllables.

"innit" just makes it.

sitigeltfel
24th Sep 2018, 15:43
Because this generation can not understand words of more than two syllables.
And some American presidents, apparently.

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/usage/cannot-or-can-not

President Obama Diagnosed With Speech Impediment | You make the news...We report it! (http://satireworld.com/us-news-headlines/201304201841/president-obama-diagnosed-with-speech-impediment/)

;)

KelvinD
24th Sep 2018, 16:05
Because the originator, Trump, thinks propaganda refers to a genuine male goose.

WingNut60
24th Sep 2018, 16:14
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/usage/cannot-or-can-not

President Obama Diagnosed With Speech Impediment You make the news...We report it! (http://satireworld.com/us-news-headlines/201304201841/president-obama-diagnosed-with-speech-impediment/)

;)

Are you inferring incorrect use of "can not"?
Sorry, but the spelling gizmos often bounce "cannot" so I now tend to use "can not" as a default..
As for Obama's speech impediment, sorry again. I admire the oratorical skills of both Obama and Clinton (that's Bill, accent aside)
The last literate and eloquent Republican was George the 1st.
Before that? Maybe Abe?

RedhillPhil
24th Sep 2018, 16:25
No-one likes to use a simple word or phrase nowadays.
People used to have an XX birthday. Now they turn XX. On the train that I'm currently travelling on the Guard keeps announcing the " next station stop". What other sort of stop are we punters interested in?

finfly1
24th Sep 2018, 16:31
No-one likes to use a simple word or phrase nowadays.
People used to have an XX birthday. Now they turn XX. On the train that I'm currently travelling on the Guard keeps announcing the " next station stop". What other sort of stop are we punters interested in?

English, as a school subject in the US,, has evolved to *gag* "English Language Arts"

treadigraph
24th Sep 2018, 16:34
Station stop has been bugging me for years. I suppose it just might possibly hark back to slam door days when I recall that several Darwin candidates opened doors at red signals and stepped off their train at a point bereft of a platform... But all UK trains have driver operated doors or interlocks now don't they?

gemma10
24th Sep 2018, 16:39
I suppose it`s because we are all "going forward".

ImageGear
24th Sep 2018, 16:42
Is there a reason why the word 'propaganda' has been binned in preference for the phrase 'fake news', or is there a distinction between the two that I'm missing ?

I would contend that propaganda is not meant to be used to misinform ones friends and allies unless they are seriously "off track". Fake news is more about misinforming anybody and everybody.

IG

pattern_is_full
24th Sep 2018, 16:50
On the train that I'm currently travelling on the Guard keeps announcing the " next station stop". What other sort of stop are we punters interested in?

Actually, that is not "new" usage, but age-old usage. Trains (or busses, etc.) always stop at station stops, whether or not anyone is getting on or off. As opposed to request or signal or flag or "whistle" stops, at which they only stop if there is a boarding or deboarding passenger for that stop on that trip.

KelvinD
24th Sep 2018, 18:23
On my first visit to the USA many years ago, I was intrigued when, shortly after landing at DFW, it was announced we would be "stopping momentarily" at the gate. I was wondering how many seconds we would all have to get off the plane!

Um... lifting...
24th Sep 2018, 18:35
On my first visit to the USA many years ago, I was intrigued when, shortly after landing at DFW, it was announced we would be "stopping momentarily" at the gate. I was wondering how many seconds we would all have to get off the plane!

Much like "tabling an agenda item". In British usage, it means discussions of the item will commence. In American usage, it means discussions of the item will cease.

jez d
24th Sep 2018, 18:42
I would contend that propaganda is not meant to be used to misinform ones friends and allies unless they are seriously "off track". Fake news is more about misinforming anybody and everybody.

IG

An excellent explanation. Many thanks

WingNut60
24th Sep 2018, 18:45
On my first visit to the USA many years ago, I was intrigued when, shortly after landing at DFW, it was announced we would be "stopping momentarily" at the gate. I was wondering how many seconds we would all have to get off the plane!

In some areas of Oz, particularly some outback areas, the words "shortly" and "directly" are used interchangeably and idiomatically to signify "soon".

As in "I'll be there directly" or I'll do that shortly".
I'm pretty sure such usage sprang from the UK.

jez d
24th Sep 2018, 19:16
In some areas of Oz, particularly some outback areas, the words "shortly" and "directly" are used interchangeably and idiomatically to signify "soon".

As in "I'll be there directly" or I'll do that shortly".
I'm pretty sure such usage sprang from the UK.

Still in common usage back here in the UK Wilds.

"Soon" is as noncommittal as "directly" and "shortly", so natural bedfellows. As is "god willing", and my absolute favourite non sequitur, 'I'll only be a moment'.

Random SLF
24th Sep 2018, 19:30
In some areas of Oz, particularly some outback areas, the words "shortly" and "directly" are used interchangeably and idiomatically to signify "soon".

As in "I'll be there directly" or I'll do that shortly".
I'm pretty sure such usage sprang from the UK.

In (Old) South Wales the expression is "I'll do it now in a minute".

jez d
24th Sep 2018, 19:50
In (Old) South Wales the expression is "I'll do it now in a minute".

… Superb !

Um... lifting...
24th Sep 2018, 21:02
They have bigger tables in the US and so can afford to keep such things there, whereas in the UK, such things get put on the shelf to keep the table space free for other purposes.

True.

The Lord Speaker sits on the Woolsack (which until 1938 wasn't even full of wool, but horsehair).

His counterpart in the U.S. sits on a chair.

DaveReidUK
24th Sep 2018, 21:10
On my first visit to the USA many years ago, I was intrigued when, shortly after landing at DFW, it was announced we would be "stopping momentarily" at the gate. I was wondering how many seconds we would all have to get off the plane!

Even more alarming is when the pilot announces when on final approach that "we'll be landing momentarily". :O

svhar
24th Sep 2018, 22:43
I have been on lots of trains where they have stopped in the middle of nowhere. Stops. But not at a station.

RedhillPhil
24th Sep 2018, 22:52
Still in common usage back here in the UK Wilds.

"Soon" is as noncommittal as "directly" and "shortly", so natural bedfellows. As is "god willing", and my absolute favourite non sequitur, 'I'll only be a moment'.
Come to Cornwall. Here we do things "dreckley".

sitigeltfel
30th Sep 2018, 13:10
The Fench leftist leader, Jean Luc Melenchon, claimed that the Socialist paradise of Cuba has developed a vaccine that cures lung cancer.... except it hasn't!

http://www.leparisien.fr/politique/un-vaccin-cubain-contre-le-cancer-du-poumon-quand-melenchon-relaie-une-fake-news-30-09-2018-7906944.php#xtor=AD-1481423552

Crédule!