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james ozzie
16th Sep 2018, 07:23
I found this intriguing and amusing but you need to read it carefully.

It had been a rough day, so when I walked into the party I was very chalant, despite my efforts to appear gruntled and consolate. I was furling my wieldy umbrella for the coat check when I saw her standing alone in a corner. She was a descript person, a woman in a state of total array. Her hair was kempt, her clothing shevelled, and she moved in a gainly way. I wanted desperately to meet her, but I knew I'd have to make bones about it, since I was travelling cognito. Beknownst to me, the hostess, whom I could see both hide and hair of, was very proper, so it would be skin off my nose if anything bad happened. And even though I had only swerving loyalty to her, my manners couldn't be peccable. Only toward and heard-of behavior would do. Fortunately, the embarrassment that my maculate appearance might cause was evitable. There were two ways about it, but the chances that someone as flappable as I would be ept enough to become persona grata or sung hero were slim. I was, after all, something to sneeze at, someone you could easily hold a candle to, someone who usually aroused bridled passion. So I decided not to rush it. But then, all at once, for some apparent reason, she looked in my direction and smiled in a way that I could make heads or tails of. So, after a terminable delay, I acted with mitigated gall and made my way through the ruly crowd with strong givings. Nevertheless, since this was all new hat to me and I had no time to prepare a promptu speech, I was petuous. She responded well, and I was mayed that she considered me a savory character who was up to some good. She told me who she was. "What a perfect nomer," I said, advertently. The conversation became more and more choate, and we spoke at length to much avail. But I was defatigable, so I had to leave at a godly hour. I asked if she wanted to come with me. To my delight, she was committal. We left the party together and have been together ever since. I have given her my love, and she has requited it.
(The New Yorker)

So far, I can only think of:

Dulating (meaning flat, opposite of undulating)

Any other offers?

Allan Lupton
16th Sep 2018, 09:22
What goes around . . .
When we left school in the 1950s we all tried to be couth, kempt and shevelled.

Blues&twos
16th Sep 2018, 09:29
The problem was easy to solve - I was plussed by it.

DaveReidUK
16th Sep 2018, 10:21
I've always wondered what the opposite of inflammable is. :O

lomapaseo
16th Sep 2018, 15:25
I yearn for the day when I will be potent again

gemma10
16th Sep 2018, 16:12
My weight is proportionate to my size!

hiflymk3
16th Sep 2018, 16:45
I've never been so barrassed.in my life.

dogsridewith
16th Sep 2018, 17:32
Thank you. I couldn't solve."What a perfect nomer."

Copying here to Edit Post shows that the whole piece passes spell-checker. But you if erase and replace one letter of the prefix-deleted words, some pass and some fail. Guessing more might be in older dictionaries than new ones?

ORAC
16th Sep 2018, 18:52
Misnomer......

old,not bold
16th Sep 2018, 20:58
I've always wondered what the opposite of inflammable is.

WiKi.....What's the difference between 'flammable' and 'inflammable'?"When cooking over a gas stove, avoid wearing loose, (flammable/inflammable) clothing that could catch fire easily." Which word is correct: flammable or inflammable?

Trick question: both flammable and inflammable are correct, as they both mean "capable of being easily ignited and of burning quickly." This makes no sense to the Modern English speaker. In English, we think of in- as a prefix that means "not": inactive means "not active," inconclusive means "not conclusive," inconsiderate means "not considerate." Therefore, inflammable should mean "not flammable.

that would make sense—if inflammable had started out as an English word. We get inflammable from the Latin verb inflammare, which combines flammare ("to catch fire") with a Latin prefix in-, which means "to cause to." This in- shows up occasionally in English words, though we only tend to notice it when the in- word is placed next to its root word for comparison: impassive and passive, irradiatedand radiated, inflame and flame. Inflammable came into English in the early 1600s.

Things were fine until 1813, when a scholar translating a Latin text coined the English word flammable from the Latin flammare, and now we had a problem: two words that look like antonyms but are actually synonyms. There has been confusion between the two words ever since.

What do you do? To avoid confusion, choose flammable when you are referring to something that catches fire and burns easily, and use the relatively recent nonflammable when referring to something that doesn't catch fire and burn easily. Our files indicate that use of flammable and nonflammable has increased in print over the last few decades, while use of inflammable has decreased.

Got it?

Ascend Charlie
17th Sep 2018, 12:02
Such a dumb language. And the colloquialisms are hard to understand, or even overstand.

When Tiger Woods is playing below par, does that mean he is doing well, or doing badly?

If everything is an uphill battle, it is difficult. But then it all goes downhill, it gets worse?

ORAC
17th Sep 2018, 12:50
And when things burn down they go up in flames....

Bergerie1
17th Sep 2018, 16:16
What is the difference between 'to slow up' and 'to slow down'?

funfly
17th Sep 2018, 17:50
Do you pull the curtains open or pull them closed?

DType
17th Sep 2018, 17:53
Significant difference between a warm welcome and a hot reception!

jimtherev
17th Sep 2018, 22:31
And do you get up from the table or get down from the table? (Those who continue to eat at the table, that is...)

Trossie
17th Sep 2018, 22:49
Misnomer......

Isn't that sexist? What about Mr Nomer?

gemma10
17th Sep 2018, 22:59
Do you pull the curtains open or pull them closed?

Aren`t you supposed to draw the curtains?

k3k3
17th Sep 2018, 23:27
To be gruntled.

Ascend Charlie
18th Sep 2018, 01:47
To be censed, furiated, terned, ane, wear derwear.

megan
18th Sep 2018, 04:39
Aren`t you supposed to draw the curtains? Pencil or pen?

Flypro
18th Sep 2018, 07:46
If you just drawer the curtains you wont have to worry about them anymore

ExSp33db1rd
18th Sep 2018, 09:31
Pencil or pen?

That's the problem, nobody uses them anymore, all digital now.

racedo
18th Sep 2018, 14:09
WiKi.....What's the difference between 'flammable' and 'inflammable'?"?

Couple of hundred degress generally plus a huge degree of panic.

sixchannel
18th Sep 2018, 14:21
Aren`t you supposed to draw the curtains?

I would but I'm unsure in these days of PC, whether to use a pencil, pen or crayon.
Maybe I should just pull myself together.

racedo
18th Sep 2018, 17:33
Aren`t you supposed to draw the curtains?

If you neighbours are nubile co-eds then it becomes a debate.

Theviewdownhere
19th Sep 2018, 10:12
A question once asked of me by someone with English being their second language (and I could not answer).

"What is the difference between filling in a form or filling out a form"

Answers on a postcard please

hiflymk3
19th Sep 2018, 10:44
If you neighbours are nubile co-eds then it becomes a debate.
Forget the debate, where's the binoculars?
But then shouldn't a telescope be called a nocular?

CargoMatatu
19th Sep 2018, 13:37
Or monocular?

Allan Lupton
19th Sep 2018, 15:24
"What is the difference between filling in a form or filling out a form"
it's the same geographically-based difference as standing for election and running for election.

hiflymk3
19th Sep 2018, 17:04
If a trade ban is an embargo, is a trade deal a bargo?

gemma10
19th Sep 2018, 21:06
Disinterested is commonly used where Uninterested would make more sense. Now that`s very interesting.

hiflymk3
19th Sep 2018, 22:21
Very tresting.

Mad Monk
20th Sep 2018, 17:14
Such a dumb language. And the colloquialisms are hard to understand, or even overstand.

When Tiger Woods is playing below par, does that mean he is doing well, or doing badly?

If everything is an uphill battle, it is difficult. But then it all goes downhill, it gets worse?

Translation and interpretation are dependent upon context, disregard it and you create gibberish.

sixchannel
20th Sep 2018, 17:30
Translation and interpretation are dependent upon context, disregard it and you create gibberish.
Very sorry Mr Mad Monk for just having a bit of fun.

Mad Monk
20th Sep 2018, 17:37
Sixchannel, all for a bit of fun, but some take humour for fact; carry on.

KelvinD
20th Sep 2018, 18:30
A prefix very heavily used today is "pre". I wish someone would ban it!
"Pre-existing": Either something exists or it doesn't exist. I now one could say that it referred to a state in the past before something existed but listen to the advertising idiots when they refer to insuring against a pre-existing illness. If the illness was indeed "pre" then it hadn't yet come into being.
"Pre-order": As in "You can order your copy of this week's gibberish magazine.." Either you order the bloody thing or you don't!

spekesoftly
21st Sep 2018, 01:41
Either you order the bloody thing or you don't! Pre-cisely

megan
21st Sep 2018, 03:53
One that grates with me is terminology such as "down select", seem to read it everywhere these days.

Clop_Clop
21st Sep 2018, 15:19
Maybe they are changing things. Before release it could be a pre-order but then it needs to change to a order at the time of release. The window of being able to place a order only a second or two, maximum three, after the announcement is made! After that only post-orders are accepted.

Why suffix instead of postfix ?

gemma10
21st Sep 2018, 16:09
In the music world we have preludes and postludes to name just two but never suffludes.

mickjoebill
21st Sep 2018, 16:18
If only this thread had been called a Mission of Fixes!


mjb

hiflymk3
21st Sep 2018, 17:34
In the music world we have preludes and postludes to name just two but never suffludes.
But then, what is a lude?

gemma10
21st Sep 2018, 17:46
But then, what is a lude?

From the Latin ludere to play

hiflymk3
21st Sep 2018, 20:07
So a prelude is like foreplay, only longer?
How lude.
Thanks for the education gemma.

SARF
21st Sep 2018, 21:04
Call 999 and tell them your thermic.. they can flip a coin