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Rated De
7th Sep 2018, 22:59
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/news/ba-british-airways-data-hack-compensation/

In a disturbingly frequent occurrence, a data hack exposed BA customers to a huge potential financial loss.
Given Qantas and SACL has a deal in place to both capture and utilise personal bio metric data using facial recognition technology, without any legislation to sanction use, storage and exploitation, the question must be asked:
Why does the Australian parliament even permit two almost monopoly entities to do this without any safeguards? Given the BA 'security' has been exposed as compromised why would Australia permit such a personal invasion of privacy without at least ensuring safeguards are in place?

https://www.smh.com.au/business/companies/your-face-will-be-your-passport-sydney-airport-to-trial-biometrics-20180221-p4z14p.html

TBM-Legend
7th Sep 2018, 23:14
The data issue is not just confined to airlines and airports as cyber crime is hitting many many institutions these days including banks and other organisations. Privately companies
"sell" lists to others when looking to expand contacts or for other purposes.

Welcome to the almost unbridled information age.

cattletruck
9th Sep 2018, 10:36
The black market for trading in personal data has been around for decades and is not confined to just the aviation industry. What has changed in the last few years is how that unauthorised data gets released/hacked and how that unauthorised data is auctioned on the dark web to the highest bidder.

Where there is a buyer there will always be a seller.

Rated De
9th Sep 2018, 22:04
The black market for trading in personal data has been around for decades and is not confined to just the aviation industry. What has changed in the last few years is how that unauthorised data gets released/hacked and how that unauthorised data is auctioned on the dark web to the highest bidder.

Where there is a buyer there will always be a seller.

That is not at issue. Completely agree.
The problem now is that with respect to the SACL and Qantas facial recognition program there is neither legislatively framework governing its use, nor statutory remedy for its (inevitable) abuse.