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View Full Version : What has this got to do with Britain?


jolihokistix
27th Apr 2018, 09:08
The BBC is asking us to take part in a conversation, but the environment is totally off the wall.
Crossing Divides (http://crossingdivides.bbcnewslabs.co.uk/story/start/0/en)

Andy_S
27th Apr 2018, 09:16
I do think the BBC go way beyond their remit at times.

Katamarino
27th Apr 2018, 10:17
Looking at the available options from each role, the author clearly has a firm agenda on one side of the debate.

treadigraph
27th Apr 2018, 10:37
Looking at the available options from each role, the author clearly has a firm agenda on one side of the debate.

I spent about 30 seconds on it and I agree - and gave up.

skydiver69
27th Apr 2018, 11:22
I'd agree with all the above comments based on what I have heard during the series so far. One recent story in this series featured a housing development in Toronto, talking about it in glowing terms and lauding its success and how it had solved problems in the area but without discussing the problems it had solved and blandly accepting its current success. This meant that the story was just an out of context puff piece which contributed nothing to the series let alone to any sort of debate about diversity in the UK.

Highway1
27th Apr 2018, 13:29
The BBC has far too much money to waste..

UniFoxOs
27th Apr 2018, 13:59
The BBC has far too much OF OUR money to waste..

Fixed that for you

FakePilot
27th Apr 2018, 14:20
I'm surprised Charlene didn't just shoot Akinjede when he asked about the gun. "HE TRIED TO TAKE MAH GUN, AN' I PUT'EM DOWN!"
Interactive argument simulators? Thanks, I'm sticking to Flight Sim.

Gertrude the Wombat
27th Apr 2018, 14:57
Fixed that for you
Not any of mine.

BehindBlueEyes
27th Apr 2018, 15:18
I don’t know why so much time and energy is even given in the UK media analysing gun ownership. We only have to look to the USA to see it doesn’t work. End of. It will never happen in the UK, so why are we even investigating it?

I’d be interested, however, in the difference between UK and US law over this particular incident; one of my guilty pleasures is watching The First 48 on the crime channel. I’m aware it may be the way it’s filmed but it seems rarely that an innocent is a victim. It’s usually drug deals gone bad or turf wars etc. A recent episode featured a shoot out between two dealers, on a suburban street. There had been a conflict over whose patch it was. Clearly, both always carried weapons so when one started firing, the other retaliated, resulting in a death. I was amazed that the second shooter had all charges dropped as it was self defence. Wouldn’t that be at least man slaughter in the UK and he couldn’t have just walked away? After all, he was armed, presumably with the intention of killing.

FakePilot
27th Apr 2018, 16:38
I don’t know why so much time and energy is even given in the UK media analysing gun ownership. We only have to look to the USA to see it doesn’t work. End of. It will never happen in the UK, so why are we even investigating it?

I’d be interested, however, in the difference between UK and US law over this particular incident; one of my guilty pleasures is watching The First 48 on the crime channel. I’m aware it may be the way it’s filmed but it seems rarely that an innocent is a victim. It’s usually drug deals gone bad or turf wars etc. A recent episode featured a shoot out between two dealers, on a suburban street. There had been a conflict over whose patch it was. Clearly, both always carried weapons so when one started firing, the other retaliated, resulting in a death. I was amazed that the second shooter had all charges dropped as it was self defence. Wouldn’t that be at least man slaughter in the UK and he couldn’t have just walked away? After all, he was armed, presumably with the intention of killing.


At least you're aware of "the way it's filmed", because, never believe television. Second, if you start to accept that "it's rarely an innocent that's a victim" suddenly US gun violence doesn't look that bad at all.

meadowrun
27th Apr 2018, 16:49
"if you start to accept that "it's rarely an innocent that's a victim" suddenly US gun violence doesn't look that bad at all"

All that means is that you are dependent on firearms to control a criminal population armed with far too many firearms. Viscous circle and far too entrenched for any possible changes there.

MG23
27th Apr 2018, 19:14
All that means is that you are dependent on firearms to control a criminal population armed with far too many firearms.

Criminals can always get guns if they want them. Because, you know, criminals.

Making submachineguns for gangs seems to be a growth industry here in Canada. A couple were arrested last year for making MAC-10s in their workshop, and I gather a TEC-9 factory was discovered in Montreal recently.

And, in another ten years or so, they'll just 3D-print them.

Personally I'd be more worried about living in a country where people are apparently so violent and unstable that they can't be trusted with guns. Because anyone who wants an AK47 will soon be able to download it off the Internet.

Gertrude the Wombat
27th Apr 2018, 21:34
Because anyone who wants an AK47 will soon be able to download it off the Internet.
That's what they said about banknotes. Have you tried printing one?

meadowrun
27th Apr 2018, 21:58
Might have some time to wait for non-industrial 3D powdered metal forge printers for home use.
But, you can probably do a neat toy gun now.

Gertrude the Wombat
27th Apr 2018, 22:31
Might have some time to wait for non-industrial 3D powdered metal forge printers for home use.
But, you can probably do a neat toy gun now.
El Reg wrote an assay on this not that long ago. I think they ended up saying you could print a gun that would have a pretty crappy go at firing one shot, but would damage itself so much in the process that it wasn't of any further use. However I think this was in the context of smuggling plastic guns through metal detectors, I don't know if they've done the same analysis on printing metal guns.

MG23
28th Apr 2018, 04:31
Have you tried printing one?

In one of my previous incarnations I had a contract to look at banknote printing on some of the early colour PC printers, to determine whether they could produce something that would pass as real ('cause if it did, the people paying us were going to freak out). Answer: no, not at that time, at least if a human was looking at it.

As I understand it, banknotes can't easily be printed today because:

a) governments put hidden patterns in the notes.
b) governments force printer manufacturers to put code in the printers so they refuse to print anything that contains those patterns.

Good luck convincing criminals to put such patterns in their AK47 plans, or to not delete any such printing restrictions from their open-source 3D-printer firmware.

Because, you know, criminals.

MG23
28th Apr 2018, 04:49
Might have some time to wait for non-industrial 3D powdered metal forge printers for home use.

That's why I said 'ten years or so'.