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ShotOne
21st Apr 2018, 21:14
“Everybody’s bank accounts have taken a big hit” says Mr Oakes of the National Farmers Union...except not really everyone since aren’t the people charging those record prices, er, farmers?

VP959
21st Apr 2018, 22:16
“Everybody’s bank accounts have taken a big hit” says Mr Oakes of the National Farmers Union...except not really everyone since aren’t the people charging those record prices, er, farmers?

Very true. Farmers in places like Cornwall, where they import virtually all their straw from elsewhere in the UK, will do very badly, but on the other hand, there will be really big winners over in the east of the country, where some the really big grain growers are. They should be making loads of money come harvest time.

Gertrude the Wombat
21st Apr 2018, 22:54
Very true. Farmers in places like Cornwall, where they import virtually all their straw ...
The Cornish farmer's field that I know best is approximately vertical and grows gorse. The income from this land is an EU subsidy for not growing cauliflowers (called "broccoli" locally). So this guy won't lose any money from increased straw prices ... but he will from #brexit.

Cpt_Pugwash
21st Apr 2018, 23:16
The Cornish farmer's field that I know best is approximately vertical and grows gorse. The income from this land is an EU subsidy for not growing cauliflowers (called "broccoli" locally). So this guy won't lose any money from increased straw prices ... but he will from #brexit.

That reminds me of the " Not raising pigs" letter ..

"16 May 2007.
Dear Secretary of State,
A friend, who is in farming at the moment, has recently received a cheque for £3,000 from the Rural Payments Agency for not rearing pigs and I would like to join the ‘not rearing pigs’ business.
In your opinion, what is the best kind of farm not to rear pigs on, and which is the best breed of pig not to rear? I want to be sure I approach this endeavour in keeping with all government policies, as dictated by the EU under the Common Agricultural Policy. I would prefer not to rear bacon pigs, but if this not the type you want not rearing, I will just as gladly not rear porkers. Are there any advantages in not rearing rare breeds such as Saddlebacks or Gloucester Old Spots, or are there too many farmers not rearing these already?
As I see it, the hardest part of this programme will be keeping an accurate record of just how many pigs I haven’t reared. Are there any Government or Local Authority courses on this?
My friend is very satisfied with this business. He has been rearing pigs for forty years or so, and the best annual return he ever made on them was £1,422 in 1978; that is, until this year, when he received your cheque for £3,000 for not rearing any.
If I were to get £3,000 for not rearing fifty pigs, will I be entitled to £6,000 for not rearing a hundred? I plan to operate on a small scale at first, holding myself down to about 4,000 pigs not raised, which will mean about £240,000 for the first year. However, as I become more expert in not rearing pigs, I plan to be more ambitious, perhaps increasing to, say, 40,000 pigs not reared in my second year, for which I should expect about £2.4 million from your department. Incidentally, I wonder if I would be eligible to receive tradable carbon credits for all these pigs not producing harmful and polluting methane gases?
Another point: these pigs that I plan not to rear will not eat 2,000 tonnes of cereals. I understand that you also pay farmers not to grow crops, so will I qualify for payments for not growing cereals in order not to feed the pigs I don’t rear?
In order to diversify, I am also considering the ‘not milking cows’ business, so please send any information leaflets you have on that too, please. Would you also include the current DEFRA advice on set-aside fields? Can this be done on an e-commerce basis of ‘virtual’ fields of which I seem to have several thousand hectares?
In view of the above, you will realise that I shall be totally unemployed and will, therefore, qualify for unemployment benefits over and above the monies that I shall receive from DEFRA’s Rural Payments Agency.
I shall, of course, be voting for your party at the next General Election.
Yours Faithfully


NXXXX JXXXXXX-HXXX "

ShyTorque
21st Apr 2018, 23:27
Very true. Farmers in places like Cornwall, where they import virtually all their straw from elsewhere in the UK, will do very badly, but on the other hand, there will be really big winners over in the east of the country, where some the really big grain growers are. They should be making loads of money come harvest time.

Let's hope it doesn't become the straw that broke the Camel's back...

FullOppositeRudder
22nd Apr 2018, 03:20
For those outside of the UK (like me) here is the original story:

www.bbc.com/news/business-43821985 (http://www.bbc.com/news/business-43821985)

Ogre
22nd Apr 2018, 03:22
Let's hope it doesn't become the straw that broke the Camel's back...

Or the last straw for that matter....

meadowrun
22nd Apr 2018, 03:55
Actually there are or were a few uses for gorse.

megan
22nd Apr 2018, 04:49
Money not to grow things. Asked a fellow pilot who was US, me Oz, "what are you going to do after the war?". Move to Florida and not grow oranges. Puzzlement disappeared on explanation.

VP959
22nd Apr 2018, 09:25
Let's hope it doesn't become the straw that broke the Camel's back...

My mother still lives on the farm in Cornwall, and reared pigs for decades. The straw price in Cornwall has always been an issue, as it's virtually all imported from elsewhere, and has always been expensive. I can remember wife number one (from when I still lived in Cornwall, and she owned a few horses) always complaining about the price of straw and hay forty years ago, so nothing has changed much.

ORAC
22nd Apr 2018, 09:27
Well as they say, make hay whilst the sun shines.....

Smeagol
22nd Apr 2018, 09:54
No straw man arguments yet !

Sallyann1234
22nd Apr 2018, 09:56
I'm sure there is a grain of truth in there.

PS
Let's hope it doesn't become the straw that broke the Camel's back...
Nice one for those who understand the reference. :)

Gertrude the Wombat
22nd Apr 2018, 10:03
Actually there are or were a few uses for gorse.
Indeed. That field is only nearly vertical, and (in daylight at least) it's a shortcut to the beach. It's sometimes necessary to hold on to a gorse bush (yes really) to stop yourself sliding down or to pull yourself up.

cavortingcheetah
22nd Apr 2018, 11:41
Steep contours are relatively common on Hampshire agricultural land where, in olden days, vineyards were often planted or constructed by the Romans. Today of course, there is little point in attempting to cultivate such precipitate pieces if only because hand tilling and sowing was gone with the wind and tractors can't make the vertical gradient horizontal. What some happy Hampshire farmers have done, from time to time, is to claim such unworkable pieces of land as being set aside and then claim a thumping EU subsidy from the ludicrous Common Agricultural Poiicy (CAP) budget. A fabulous fund that is specifically designed and maintained in order to benefit the laziest land labourers of the lot, the French.
If you do Brexit you won't have to pay into that of course.
In addition to those living benefits, transient advantages also apply to agricultural land. Suffice to say that agricultural land can usually be passed on and inherited without inheritance tax. There are too, wonderfully advantageous CGT schemes that apply to farm land as well.
Not wishing to appear as totally unsympathetic to farmers, one could point out that warmer weather is upon Britain and many bovines will now be pastured. The early warm weather should lead to a generally decent harvest, much straw will be bailed and straw bedding stored for the winter. I wonder too if straw shortages in Britain now are not partly a consequence of farmers storing straw outside under plastic through a wet and snowy winter instead of inside, in nice EU subsidised barns? Straw rots very easily, don'tcha know.

G-CPTN
22nd Apr 2018, 12:46
Straw is now sought after to fuel biomass boilers.
Some suppliers have 'contracts' that have to be met using straw that otherwise would be available for animals.

meadowrun
22nd Apr 2018, 14:26
Isn't the intent of biomass boilers to use what would otherwise be wasted biomass fuel?


Straw is not wasted. It has better uses.

G-CPTN
22nd Apr 2018, 15:17
Isn't the intent of biomass boilers to use what would otherwise be wasted biomass fuel?

Agreed, but the suppliers (and users) need to have supply agreements to plan their activities.

Sallyann1234
22nd Apr 2018, 15:20
Isn't the intent of biomass boilers to use what would otherwise be wasted biomass fuel?

Have you ever wondered who is going eat those fields of highly edible sweetcorn you drive past in the westcountry?

https://articles.extension.org/pages/27536/corn-for-biofuel-production

meadowrun
22nd Apr 2018, 15:34
Something wrong with the equation.
This is part of a cornfield in our west country.
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3241/2787707332_f47e624376_z.jpg

Traffic_Is_Er_Was
22nd Apr 2018, 16:10
Straw is not wasted. It has better uses.
No good as a building material though. Will not withstand huffing and puffing.

Super VC-10
23rd Apr 2018, 15:38
No good as a building material though. Will not withstand huffing and puffing.

Actually, it is quite a good building material, when mixed with subsoil and cow dung.

G-CPTN
23rd Apr 2018, 16:59
No good as a building material though. Will not withstand huffing and puffing.

Actually, it is quite a good building material, when mixed with subsoil and cow dung.

Also good when baled and stacked as walls.

bgbazz
23rd Apr 2018, 17:08
Actually, it is quite a good building material, when mixed with subsoil and cow dung.


I actually live in a large house...11 rooms, 3 floors, built from this material. Most of the structure is more than 200 years old and still holding strong. I added to the original design (using the same material) about 10 years ago and it's fine.

As an aside, I can buy 50 tons of wheat straw over here for less than 10 pounds...transport costs, because the farmers usually burn it.

pax britanica
23rd Apr 2018, 17:29
leaving the Eu will make no difference to farm subsidies except that we will have to pay all of them in the UK which is not the case today.

The laziest farmer of all of course is the Editor of the Daily Hate who receives a large Eu subsidy for keeping his land in the north of Britain for shooting and not farming.

More serious the CAP isnt all that bad since it does moderate boom and bust in farming, keeps land in shape when not being farmed or grazed and helps keep the Great Satan at bay with its huge mass marketed ag products that are often cheap but full of steroids, hormones and god knows what else but have no taste at all

Highway1
23rd Apr 2018, 17:34
leaving the Eu will make no difference to farm subsidies except that we will have to pay all of them in the UK which is not the case today.



That makes no sense - the UK is a net payer into the EU budget so any farm subsidies that the EU pay out in the UK is simply our own money being sent back

ShyTorque
23rd Apr 2018, 19:11
I'm sure there is a grain of truth in there.

PS

Nice one for those who understand the reference. :)

Thanks, you obviously spotted the capital letter! ;)

ShyTorque
23rd Apr 2018, 19:17
Highway1 (https://www.pprune.org/members/475048-highway1)
Join Date: Jan 2018 Location: Mexico
Posts: 51

That makes no sense - the UK is a net payer into the EU budget so any farm subsidies that the EU pay out in the UK is simply our own money being sent back


We're subsidising MEXICO? :eek: Build a wall, I say! ;)

glad rag
23rd Apr 2018, 20:04
Don't you mean hay?

Gertrude the Wombat
23rd Apr 2018, 20:43
leaving the Eu will make no difference to farm subsidies
Yes it will. It will reduce them all to zero, as all the £350m/week is promised to the NHS, so there's nothing left to replace EU farm subsidies.

Sallyann1234
23rd Apr 2018, 21:04
Yes it will. It will reduce them all to zero, as all the £350m/week is promised to the NHS, so there's nothing left to replace EU farm subsidies.
Ah, but it wasn't promised to the NHS. It was only meant to 'look' like that.
Understand?

Gertrude the Wombat
23rd Apr 2018, 22:08
Ah, but it wasn't promised to the NHS. It was only meant to 'look' like that.
Understand?
So you're suggesting that the farmers were secretly tipped the wink that the bus was a lie, and voted "leave" with their fingers crossed?

Sallyann1234
24th Apr 2018, 09:27
So you're suggesting that the farmers were secretly tipped the wink that the bus was a lie, and voted "leave" with their fingers crossed?
No.




.