PDA

View Full Version : The best things in life are often the little ones


blue up
19th Apr 2018, 08:06
20 years in commercial aviation. Best reward I think I've ever had. I've been cheerful all day. :)

Scoggy
19th Apr 2018, 21:53
That is lovely and obviously heartfelt.

I’m a train driver. I’m used to the occaisional “Cheers Mate” but when a little tot looks and smiles after I’ve given them a, gentle, two-tone response to their waving, really makes my day.

Loose rivets
19th Apr 2018, 23:06
That little drawing in the OP's picture reminded me of a plastic toy T-tailed jet that my kids pushed around the living room.

I flew with a pal in Eagle before going on to another outfit in which he gained his first command. Now and then while taxiing in at Luton, one of my duties was to wave back at his wife and children. "Wave, Rob!!!" He'd boom out. Seems like yesterday.

charliegolf
20th Apr 2018, 10:45
Charliegolf headteacher...

Two 6 year olds brought to my room so I could be amazed at their story writing. During my speech of wonder and delight at their writing, I notice that Lucia is transfixed on a pic on my wall of me with my daughter on her wedding day a few weeks before. She says, "Mr Golf, have you married a princess?" Cheesey smile on face all day!

CG

glad rag
20th Apr 2018, 10:59
Hahahahahahahaha that's great:ok:

NutLoose
20th Apr 2018, 11:03
Years ago working at a flying school we were contacted requesting if we could fly two plane mad kids about 5 and 6, as they parents were desperate due to getting nagged about flying, we sadly couldn't, however about 2 weeks later we recieved some flyers for the airports open day and an airline was doing air experience flights, I scanned and emailed the flyer to the family.
A few weeks later I got a gushing email thanking me, they had took the kids along on the pretext of watching the planes and then told them they were going up in one, the 30 min air experience flight turned into 45 mins and the kids were over the moon as were the parents, I too walked around feeling like I had achieved something good.

glad rag
20th Apr 2018, 11:15
Years ago working at a flying school we were contacted requesting if we could fly two plane mad kids about 5 and 6, as they parents were desperate due to getting nagged about flying, we sadly couldn't, however about 2 weeks later we recieved some flyers for the airports open day and an airline was doing air experience flights, I scanned and emailed the flyer to the family.
A few weeks later I got a gushing email thanking me, they had took the kids along on the pretext of watching the planes and then told them they were going up in one, the 30 min air experience flight turned into 45 mins and the kids were over the moon as were the parents, I too walked around feeling like I had achieved something good.

>----:ok:-----<

Hydromet
20th Apr 2018, 12:44
Nutty, back in about 1980, the local (Traralgon) aero club offered light aircraft flights for kids. My two daughters, about 5 & 3 at the time, went, and loved it.
D1 is presently doing her PPL in Annapolis, VA. I blame that first light aircraft flight.

Fareastdriver
20th Apr 2018, 16:52
Years ago at Silverstone I was shifting punters into the circuit with a SK76 helicopter. During the race I was shut down in the helicopter park and whilst I was wandering around this kid of about ten years old helped me find the food stalls etc.

I saw him again just before the race finished and asked him if he wanted to look over my helicopter. I took him around and sat him in the left hand seat and that was when he found out that I was going to reposition it to the passenger pickup line.

I briefed him to keep his hands lightly on the controls and for the few minutes it took his face was a absolute picture.

You can't do that nowadays.

Planemike
20th Apr 2018, 18:38
....and lost SO MUCH by NOT being able to do things like that.......!!!

Loose rivets
20th Apr 2018, 18:48
I put this on FB recently. My middle-aged son said it wasn't the hat, it was having to wear socks with sandals.


And no, I wasn't responsible for the wallpaper.

cargosales
20th Apr 2018, 20:06
Fareastdriver, good for you Sir :ok: and you have reminded me of something I posted up here years ago:

Many years ago I was a CI on a Volunteer Gliding School. Every weekend cadets would arrive for Air Experience Flights - @ 3 or 4 mins of 'up, round and down' .... except that sometimes it went a little bit deeper...

One weekend an ATC Squadron from a seriously deprived inner-city location pitched up and as I walked onto the field one of them, a young lad maybe 13 or 14, simply stopped in his tracks and almost whispered "Wow, all this green"... He'd never seen anything like it before, despite it being less than 10 miles from where he lived. And all morning he worked his socks off, pulling, pushing, helping out etc

Come lunchtime when us G1s were allowed to try and get away (and stay up) from a single launch, I asked for a volunteer who'd have to miss lunch but 'would help me with something important' and this lad's hand was first in the air.

IIRC, we got in 30+ minutes of soaring, with him flying much of it, and the look on his face afterwards was something I'll never forget :ok:

CS

meadowrun
21st Apr 2018, 00:29
Very nice
but...
seriously deprived inner-city location
Hope he got some lunch after all.

Mostly Harmless
21st Apr 2018, 00:39
Nice thank you letter but, for the life of me, I can't figure out what is supposed to be going on the the "5 minutes later" side of that picture.

SMT Member
21st Apr 2018, 09:00
I received a very nice present for a round birthday a few years ago: A flight in a Stearman with a champion aerobatic pilot. My daughter had tagged along for the ride to the airfield, and after we landed the pilot offered her a go. She was around 9 at the time, and about as far removed from an aviation enthusiast as a 9-year old girl can be. 'Of course she wants a go!', I blurted out, not thinking about consulting with daughter first. She got the leather helmet on, was strapped in and taken for a very gentle flight around the airfield.

She's yet to forgive me, despite my argument that 'you can brag to your friends you've flown in a 1942 Boeing', to which she'd reply 'dad, my friends haven't the foggiest what a Boeing is'.

Fareastdriver
21st Apr 2018, 10:01
They don't do riveting like that anymore!

Pinky the pilot
21st Apr 2018, 10:06
my friends haven't the foggiest what a Boeing is'.

Why does that comment make me feel sad?:sad:

Crownstay01
21st Apr 2018, 12:37
@Scoggy:

I think a lot of traincrew feel the same way. I'm on the suburbans now, but back when I was at Eveleigh on the heritage trains I'd always give the kids a pop of the 5-chime when they waved.

One occasion I'll never forget. We were coming back empty cars from a one-way charter when we got put away in the refuge at Springwood. We pulled up next to a primary school, and it was recess time. There must have been 100 or so kids in the playground who all ran to the fence to get a closer look at us, followed by a couple of amused teachers.

I noticed there was a boundary gate in the fence, so I called the box to find out how long we'd be there. They reckoned about 30 minutes, so I sent my mate down to open the gate, and I called out to to the assembled kids and asked, "Who wants to come up and have a look at the steam engine?" The kids all shouted "Yes!", the teachers agreed, and so we started bringing them up.

In the end we were stood there for about 40 minutes, and we managed to get all the kids who wanted to up for a visit to the cab. We let the more adventurous kids open the butterfly firedoors and put a round on the fire, or have a short pop of the whistle. One boy was very interested to know how we got water in to the boiler, so I showed him how to put an injector on. He was thrilled when it picked up first go, and he could see the level rise in the gauge glasses.

When we left we got a huge send-off from the kids and teachers, which made our day. A few days later a letter turned up at the depot office from the school principal thanking us for getting the kids on the engine. She went on to say that it was an experience that they couldn't stop talking about, and one she was sure they'd always remember. I know I have.

Of course these days there are less opportunities to do things like that, but now and again you get lucky. My son got invited to go up the front on a railmotor excursion at Maitland last weekend, and he impressed the driver with his signal recognition and road knowledge. That made me very proud!

ExSp33db1rd
22nd Apr 2018, 06:16
Why does that comment make me feel sad?

Using a pocket sized copy of the navigation computer Whizz wheel in the supermarket, to prove that it was better to buy 2 normal sized packets than the "special" larger one - thieving barstewards - and the teenage cashier said - Wot's that ? A circular slide rule. Wot's a slide rule ?

One could weep

megan
22nd Apr 2018, 06:21
Wot's a slide rule ?Then you pulled out your abacus. ;)

Fareastdriver
22nd Apr 2018, 10:01
to prove that it was better to buy 2 normal sized packets than the "special" larger one

Just look at the bottom of the price labels. It tells you the price in £/kg or £/ml. The lowest price is the cheapest.

Hydromet
22nd Apr 2018, 10:35
A bit of a reverse situation...on a flight from Gold Cast to Sydney, I was dismayed to find we were seated immediately in front of a high school football team, remembering what I was like as a teenaged boy of footy trips. However, they were really well behaved, an when I spoke to a couple of them as we were exiting, they were friendly, spoke in words rather than grunts, and there was no pushing or shoving (well, not from them, anyway).

I dropped an email to the school Principle, as I would have if they had misbehaved, and received a note back to say that my email had made his day, and he would see that the students and their coaches would be suitably acknowledged.

racedo
22nd Apr 2018, 17:58
5 Live story of a couple of years ago.............. train strike with limited service, everybody crammed in and driver opens up cab and allows 6-7 passenegrs in so they could get home.

Drops passengers at stations and gets to a station where clearly 2 of the pax get off every day, one said to other ne, who likely had never spoken to each other before, "Isn't this your stop" and suited guy says "Yup. But I have a chance to sit with driver of a train up front and going to wherever its going and back. Wanted to do this since I was a kid and not missing one minute of it".

Just because you get older doesn't mean you are not a kid at heart.

sitigeltfel
23rd Apr 2018, 17:03
Using a pocket sized copy of the navigation computer Whizz wheel in the supermarket, to prove that it was better to buy 2 normal sized packets than the "special" larger one - thieving barstewards - and the teenage cashier said - Wot's that ? A circular slide rule. Wot's a slide rule ?

One could weep

Supermarket shopping last week saw me looking to get some Nespresso compatible capsules. An old guy collared me while I chose my favourite brand and started ranting a bit at the price. I wasn't sure what he was on about as the supermarket ones are far cheaper than the originals, until he pointed out the price per kilo. The twelve packs were €3.90 per kilo but the twenty four packs were dearer at €4.30 per kilo. The sneaky buggers were trading on the customers assumption that bulk packs would be cheaper. Couldn't fool the old boy though!

RedhillPhil
23rd Apr 2018, 18:00
That is lovely and obviously heartfelt.

I’m a train driver. I’m used to the occaisional “Cheers Mate” but when a little tot looks and smiles after I’ve given them a, gentle, two-tone response to their waving, really makes my day.


Where are you based? Just wonderin'

WilliumMate
23rd Apr 2018, 18:24
Many years ago when I was driving out of New St we used to cover the summer Sundays to Stratford-on-Avon. Loads of families on board and almost every kid had a cab ride down the North Warwicks line. Made their (and my) day. Try it now and very likely a P45 would be your reward.

Rwy in Sight
23rd Apr 2018, 21:57
Supermarket shopping last week saw me looking to get some Nespresso compatible capsules. An old guy collared me while I chose my favourite brand and started ranting a bit at the price. I wasn't sure what he was on about as the supermarket ones are far cheaper than the originals, until he pointed out the price per kilo. The twelve packs were €3.90 per kilo but the twenty four packs were dearer at €4.30 per kilo. The sneaky buggers were trading on the customers assumption that bulk packs would be cheaper. Couldn't fool the old boy though!

Super-markets
1. My host family in the UK used to complete the list based on the path to follow from the entrance back to the tills. Hence they knew how to save on time and effort.
2. When I look at the price tag, the second thing I check is the Price per Unit (Item or Kilo or Liter). An I have caught a nymber of cases like sitigeltfel discribed. BTW which flavor did you chose?

Chris the Robot
23rd Apr 2018, 22:25
There were two things which got me really hooked on aviation. First one was a trip on a BMI 737-400, LHR-BCN back in 2001, had a very late turn onto finals <1000 feet agl on both the outbound leg to BCN and the return to LHR. After that I decided that I wanted to be a commercial pilot.

Second was a couple of trial lessons in 2003-2004, that confirmed what I already had thought.

I now drive trains and whilst I wave back at the kids and parents, I don't think I'd be able to allow them into the cab even with the key off. If I was ever asked during 9-5 hours, I'd be tempted to phone my Driver Manager so long as it was at a terminus station (key off) to see if it could be done. Otherwise, I'd suggest the parents contact the TOC, one lad's parents did and he had a day seeing all of frontline the railway jobs, including the cab of one of our flagship trains.

I think it might be a UK thing, I went to a cadet pilot assessment with an overseas carrier a couple of years back and was encouraged to seek out the pilots of my return flight home to chat with them about the role. I was able to see them after shutdown, they were very friendly and helpful too. I'd say the national culture was a bit more easygoing than the UK socially.

It's a shame it's so uptight because a train cab or an aircraft cockpit is where dreams are often born. However, with the cost of pilot training and the "two strikes and you're out" aptitude tests for train driving, it may be for the best since disappointment would be avoided.

Scoggy
24th Apr 2018, 20:49
The more cynical of my colleagues say it’s always good to engage with the youngsters as it may stop them hoiking a brick at you in a few years...

It is true that stories of trips or even being allowed in a train cab are, for the main, a thing of the past now. It’s not just the youngper generation who miss out though. Plenty of adults will stop for a chat if it’s a sunny day and they are on a day out. I do what I can, but no feet in the cab unfortunately.

I got some Karma payback a couple of years ago at Duxford. Was walking past the Comet with my pa-in-law and one of the gents preparing for a school visit let us go up and have a walk through, including, joy of joys, a wonderful 10 mins in the cockpit. Karma.

RedHillPhil, I’m based at Southend Victoria.

Fareastdriver
24th Apr 2018, 21:57
In 1948/49 I live on the station at Aldergrove and went to school at Lisburn. To do this I would catch a train. Aldergrove Halt only had a single step of stairs and the train would stop so that this was positioned by a door of the Fourth Class carriage, (wooden seats). If Frank was driving he would give me the thumps up. A different driver I would miss out.

The next stop was Crumlin and being a village had a platform. I would dismount and run up to the engine where two of my friends were and we would climb onto the footplate. We would then go down the route.

At Maghaberry halt we would shin down the rungs, run back and climb the steps back into fourth class as the station master at Lisburn didn't like to see us in the engine.

At Lisburn I would wait until my friends had left the platform before I got out of the train as we couldn't be seen together.

They were Catholics and I was a Protestant.