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rans6andrew
8th Apr 2018, 19:01
Some of you will remember me asking about stomach issues I have suffered from over the last couple of years. I have suffered bloating, acid reflux, flatulence and stomach cramps and it was not getting better. After a particularly bad episode at the start of March I decided to cut out all dairy and all caffeine from my diet.

What a revelation

Over the next few days all of my symptoms faded away. I started to sleep much better, no pain, no bloating and much less flatulence. Since then I have re-introduced a cup of coffee per day, just the one, black. I easily get fed up with tea and I don't want to turn to beer every time I get thirsty.

I have now found that I am sensitive to chocolate/cacao even when dairy free. I only had one easter egg this year and I shared that but it triggered my issues again.

What I don't understand through all of this is how/why I became sensitive to dairy, I have been eating milk, butter and cheese for the best part of 60 years but only in the last few has it been a problem.

Why might it be? Anyone?

Rans6.......................

Bergerie1
8th Apr 2018, 19:09
The ability for adults to digest lactose is a relatively recent development in human evolution. Many adults have some degree of lactose intolerance. See here:-

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/lactose-tolerance-and-human-evolution-56187902/

And this:-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MA9boI1qTuk

Good luck!

VP959
8th Apr 2018, 19:17
I've no idea why these things happen, Andrew. I love red wine, always have done, but around 7 or 8 years ago I found that I was waking up in the night with pretty severe stomach ache, bad enough to get me out of bed and walking around, drinking water, waiting for the pain to go away. It took time for me to make the link, but it's a bit odd, as I can drink white wine, beer, etc, with no ill effects. It seems to be solely something in red wine that's the trigger.

Why I should be fine drinking red wine for 30 + years, then developing what almost seems to be an allergy to the stuff, is a complete mystery.

Lactose intolerance (which is probably what you're suffering from, I think) seems to be similar, in that you can develop at any time of life it seems. My wife suffers from it, but finds that she's OK with goat's milk. I've no idea why, but for some reason that doesn't trigger the ill effects that cows milk does.

rans6andrew
8th Apr 2018, 19:44
I have tried goats milk and cheese in the past but find that I can't get used to the taste. As a substitute for cows milk we now keep soya, coconut, oat and rice milk on the go (my partner has been very sensitive to dairy for some years), some types are better for some stuff, some for others.

I am getting used to black coffee as none of the types above seem to be a satisfactory flavoured alternative..

Dining out has become interesting, I usually manage to get mashed potato replaced with chips if it has milk/butter or cheese mashed into it. Thai food doesn't use dairy but Indian food does. I'm still trying to find a satisfying Pizza.

Rans6................

G-CPTN
8th Apr 2018, 19:59
around 7 or 8 years ago I found that I was waking up in the night with pretty severe stomach ache, bad enough to get me out of bed and walking around, drinking water, waiting for the pain to go away. It seems to be solely something in red wine that's the trigger.

Why I should be fine drinking red wine for 30 + years, then developing what almost seems to be an allergy to the stuff, is a complete mystery.

I am not a biologist (of any sort), however, was there a period when you persistently over-indulged in red wine - sufficiently to make yourself really ill?

Maybe Nature decided to 'reward' you with an intolerance in order to protect you?

flash8
8th Apr 2018, 20:04
caffeine from my diet.

Had acid reflux recently, woke up one night, couldn't breath (it was like I had "forgot" how to)... suddenly involuntarily some bile came up that had been caught in my throat... acid reflux from googling. Throat spasm and irritated for days...

Cut caffeine based Energy drinks out of my daily routine (I don't drink nor smoke, it was my only vice!) and it cleared up within a few days!

Redredrobin
8th Apr 2018, 20:14
A very non-expert or up to date offering here, based on a 46-year old B.Sc. in microbiological sciences, but the immune system is unforgiving. Wine, milk, any natural food or drink, tends to contain fragments of protein, DNA, lipid or whatever, and once a fragmant has been identified as 'hostile' by our immune system it is filed away and will start a reaction whenever encountered again. I don't think there is any process to reverse false positives, which must happen from time to time. Maybe they just fade away if not activated, like inoculations need boosting every so often? There is a good BBC documentary about what goes on in the immune system after a common cold virus attack, which is partly relevant to the question, in that it shows the stages of immune resistance to any 'not invented here' substances of a biological nature.

Secret Universe, The Hidden Life of the Cell

Available for 13 days still. The CGI is pretty good, animated proteins marching along collagen highways, almost nightmarish, we only had still and low-res pictures from X-ray crystallography in my day!

Sorry not much comfort. My bugbear is recycled cooking oil...can only eat out at upmarket establishments that don't use it. First World Problem?

Bergerie1
8th Apr 2018, 20:19
VP 959,

My wife is OK on goat's milk too but not so good on cow's milk.

There seem to be a number of tolerances or intolerances that are a result of the human evolutionary process. Alcohol for example:-

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/origins-of-human-alcohol-consumption-revealed/

VP959
8th Apr 2018, 21:30
I am not a biologist (of any sort), however, was there a period when you persistently over-indulged in red wine - sufficiently to make yourself really ill?

Maybe Nature decided to 'reward' you with an intolerance in order to protect you?

Not really, I'd just developed a habit of a glass or two of wine most evenings, and the stomach trouble developed over a few weeks, getting worse and worse. Now just half a glass of red wine will kick it off, but white wine is fine.



VP 959,

My wife is OK on goat's milk too but not so good on cow's milk.

There seem to be a number of tolerances or intolerances that are a result of the human evolutionary process. Alcohol for example:-

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/origins-of-human-alcohol-consumption-revealed/

Thanks for that link, it's really interesting to read some reasons as to why we've evolved the ability to metabolise ethanol. It makes sense that we developed this ability in order to be able to digest rotting fruit. IIRC, there is one sort of rotting fruit that elephants can't resist, and they gorge on the stuff, then end up intoxicated.

CloudHound
8th Apr 2018, 21:59
Don't start me on digestive tract problems :mad:

OK, as you ask. I've had years of problems which were at their worst in 2015/16. When I retired many subsided but have steadily come back during last year resulting in an ambulance ride to A&E in extreme pain.

Since then I've had all types of tests culminating in a key hole Laparoscopy last month.

Result? Nothing found. I haven't got Cancer, Diverticulitis, Gall Bladder stones, bowel constrictions, Coeliac disease and the biopsies and blood tests returned no intolerances.

Great, so why do I feel shit Doc?

gingernut
8th Apr 2018, 22:02
Prob's a good idea to have a chat with a friendly GP who could sift through the symptoms :-)

Hydromet
8th Apr 2018, 22:15
Wife has lactose intolerance, but is fine with lactose-free milk & cream. I believe in these, the lactose is somehow converted to lactase. They both taste fine. However, lactose-free cheese is something like Sunlight soap without the pleasant flavour.

VP959
8th Apr 2018, 22:43
Don't start me on digestive tract problems :mad:

OK, as you ask. I've had years of problems which were at their worst in 2015/16. When I retired many subsided but have steadily come back during last year resulting in an ambulance ride to A&E in extreme pain.

Since then I've had all types of tests culminating in a key hole Laparoscopy last month.

Result? Nothing found. I haven't got Cancer, Diverticulitis, Gall Bladder stones, bowel constrictions, Coeliac disease and the biopsies and blood tests returned no intolerances.

Great, so why do I feel shit Doc?

I developed IBS shortly after we moved away from Cornwall and I stopped drinking Spingo (I lived within 100m of the Blue Anchor in Helston for several years). At the time I put the digestive problems (bouts of severe cramp, occasional diarrhoea or constipation, and near-constant pain when in the car, in the region of my upper left abdomen, pretty much where the seat belt goes) down to the change from drinking beer with no artificial additives and consequently some yeast etc still in it, but over a period of a couple of years things got steadily worse.

I had a similar series of tests to those you describe, and none showed any abnormalities. What I did find was that stress made the symptoms worse, and a lady scientist I worked with (who, it has to be said, was a bit into alternative medicine etc) mentioned that she suffered from IBS, something I'd never heard of and hadn't been mentioned by any of the doctors I'd seen. She recommended some relaxation tapes, but I remembered that back when I was at uni we'd had a few visits by an Indian transcendental meditation guru, and he'd taught us the basic mind-clearing principles and some relaxation techniques, like circular breathing and taking control of your muscles, learning to generate a wave-like pattern of relaxation, starting from the tips of your toes and fingers, and moving towards the centre of your abdomen.

I know this all sounds completely bonkers, but the wave-like relaxation technique works like a charm to relieve the upper left abdominal pain, and I'm guessing it does that by releasing the muscle cramps that might cause it.

My wife (who's a nurse) thinks it's a load of cobblers, and that I'm just an old hippy who still believes in all the mystical stuff from the late 60's, but for me it works. I also found that a few years after I retired the IBS pretty much went away. Attacks became less and less frequent, to the point where I cant remember when the last one was (certainly over a year ago).

I'm pretty convinced that our modern way of living, overly processed foods, our obsession with cleanliness and killing every bug that might be around, plus the stresses associated with working, commuting etc, do have a negative impact on our health, unless we have ways to mitigate them in some way. One telling factor for me was that the IBS got worse when I got kicked out of flight test and into management, and peaked when I was in a couple of really stressful and unenjoyable posts, so I'm convinced there's a strong link to job stress.

Gertrude the Wombat
8th Apr 2018, 22:52
IBS, something I'd never heard of and hadn't been mentioned by any of the doctors I'd seen
I have very distinctly got the impression from doctors that "IBS" is a label they apply meaning "this person's tummy hurts and we haven't a clue why".

Just like the skin people have some fancy-sounding Latin that actually means "red blotches of unknown cause".

VP959
8th Apr 2018, 23:04
I have very distinctly got the impression from doctors that "IBS" is a label they apply meaning "this person's tummy hurts and we haven't a clue why".

Just like the skin people have some fancy-sounding Latin that actually means "red blotches of unknown cause".

I share the same view. The symptoms seem to vary a lot from one person to another, there's no real evidence of a cause, nothing shows up on any tests, so it now just gets the IBS label.

Doesn't make it any less painful, though.

Gertrude the Wombat
8th Apr 2018, 23:07
I share the same view. The symptoms seem to vary a lot from one person to another, there's no real evidence of a cause, nothing shows up on any tests, so it now just gets the IBS label.

Doesn't make it any less painful, though.
In my case it stopped after a couple of years and never came back. No diagnosis other than "IBS", no change in lifestyle.

boguing
8th Apr 2018, 23:37
Anyone wanting an alternative to animal milk should try Oatly (oat milk). Various versions, but the Barista one tastes very like full fat cow's milk when on cereals. Available in big Wrose, Morrisons etc. I'm a very happy convert.

tdracer
8th Apr 2018, 23:41
Not really, I'd just developed a habit of a glass or two of wine most evenings, and the stomach trouble developed over a few weeks, getting worse and worse. Now just half a glass of red wine will kick it off, but white wine is fine.
There are chemicals in red wine that are not in white (tannins for sure, there may be others) that some people are sensitive to. I fall into that boat, although not the same as yours. I really like a good, dry red wine with food - where as I'd rather have water than most white wines. One glass isn't an issue, a second glass is tempting fate - any more than that and I'll get something very much like a bad hangover (and not the next morning - onset is usually within an hour). Once I figured out it was the wine it's not been much of a problem except when flying international business class - they keep topping up your glass and it's hard to keep track of how much I've had (yea, I know, just quit flying business class :E).

Loose rivets
8th Apr 2018, 23:53
I've been seriously ****** by immune reactions to things. Gluten (I'm not Celiac) and wheat, but mostly soap. There is one red wine in America, Ménage à trois, that leaves my systems screaming for nearly an hour. Every time. I asked them to help by discussing what process the bottles underwent. Someone elsewhere had suggested something to stop the wine sticking to the glass, but whatever, that one wine always made me react. They refused to help. I drink wine every day with no reaction. Yet. :hmm:

I've written on here about two huge reactions I've had, not quite life-threatening. I'm sure both as a reaction to soap. Blue light job and falling temperature and heart rate etc. The last one, a year or so ago was recorded on the paramedic's machine. Before this I simply was not believed.

The point being, although this is not a lactose issue, it has all happened with age. I wonder if it was chemistry abuse. Washing my greasy hands in terps substitute etc., etc,. Don't know, but now I can not even use a glass that has not been purged of soap - I'll be peeling the skin off my inner lips within minutes. My daughter this evening washed a wine glass but then wiped it on a tea towel. I smiled and shook my head. She started again.

It's such a pain. My systems are just poised to react. Ten years after an utterly frustrating visit to Addenbrooks I'm being referred again.

In my case it might be a life-saver. This cochlea hydrops has a Secondary version which can be caused by an immune reaction. Given that life has lost all value with the latter condition, I'm rather counting on the outcome.

The other day a friend told me her decorator brings his own cup etc. At last I have a kindred spirit. Who knows, but to wake up one day and be able to listen to music, or any pleasant sound, would be nothing short of a miracle.

Tankertrashnav
8th Apr 2018, 23:54
Nice little cartoon in The Oldie magazine a while back. Two "ladies who lunch" are sitting at a restaurant table. One is saying to the other "Actually I'm not gluten intolerant, I just like annoying people"

No offence, I know that gluten and other intolerances are a serious problem for many people, as responses on here prove, but I do think that there others who just make it up as they like the attention.

Made me laugh anyway.

Loose rivets
9th Apr 2018, 00:03
that's more or less what they implied at the local yacht club. I always took my own glass, but grew tired of the eye-rolling and comments from former friends. One, life-long. Twenty quid bottle of wine and a glass that looked like it was covered in starch. When they touched my glass, the girls would say, Ooo, doesn't it feel clean! I suppose their 800 quid investment in a wineglass washer had to be defended.

The thing is, those that knew me would have known that I was aware of the science, right down to cellular level where possible. No difference, a nail that sticks up has to be hammered down.

annakm
9th Apr 2018, 00:44
Sounds completely random but there is a correlation between lactose intolerance and eye colour. Apparently, lactose intolerance is more likely (but not always) in those with brown eyes. Consequently, it’s therefore more common in Southern European people and there are very high incidences of it in Africa. Something to do with our ancestry when we moved from being hunter gatherers to farmers. Fascinating stuff.

http://oxfordpresents.com/bozzone/lactose-intolerance/

Lonewolf_50
9th Apr 2018, 01:22
Dear OP:

Suggest you read this rather than listen to a load of JB bollox.
The Horse, the Wheel, and Language (https://press.princeton.edu/titles/8488.html)

clark y
9th Apr 2018, 04:03
Many years/decades of crew food is probably not the best for long term digestive tract health. Shift work is probably as big a problem, as is stress, fatigue, etc.

longer ron
9th Apr 2018, 07:45
About 8 years ago I started to get a permanent 'indigestion' type feeling,it started very subtly but it was unusual for me as I had never been an indigestion sufferer.Eventually I went to see the quack and he said ''take gaviscon'' but did not seem to take any notice of the fact that I had not been an indigestion sufferer.I did not want to take gaviscon so I decided it may well be an intolerence - I cut out bread - the indigestion was gone within a couple of days - I was devastated as I love bread/toast etc LOL
Although I say I am gluten intolerant - but I also realise that it could be partly an intolerance to some other [email protected] they put in the recipe.
Not easy to find good/nice gluten free bread but the Schar brown ciabatta rolls are not too bad.
I went back to see the quack on an unrelated subject 2 years later and he asked about my indigestion,I told him about the improvement after cutting out bread and he said 'interesting' - I agree about the previous comment by GTW that IBS is a label for 'we don't have a clue'.

I keep thinking about baking my own bread but we only have a small kitchen and we have enough gadgets in there already :)

Bergerie1
9th Apr 2018, 08:41
At the risk of futher thread drift here are some more articles on human evolution, diet and related diseases. Clearly it is a complicated subject. Clearly, also, human evolution is continuing and some of our health problems are due to changes in the foods we eat and the rate at which evolution over the last 10,000 years or so has allowed humans to cope. There are many evolutionary changes that have occurred as humans have spread around the world (skin colour and eye colour for example) as well as the dietary issues this thread has touched upon.

Here are two interesting articles on gluten intolerance that may help to illuminate the issue:-

https://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/05/opinion/sunday/the-myth-of-big-bad-gluten.html

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/when-and-why-did-everyone-stop-eating-gluten/

paulc
9th Apr 2018, 09:40
Slight thread drift but related to allergies. The wife of a friend of mine would get anaphalatic shock episodes on a regular basis resulting in blue light trips to local hospital and keeping of epi pens in the house. She had the usual tests done but no luck in finding the reason. However after much monitoring and recording of things eaten and used, the hubby was able to narrow it down to the toothpaste they used. They swopped brands and no more problem. It seemed that something in the toothpaste would build up over time (5 to 6 weeks) until it triggered an episode.

gemma10
9th Apr 2018, 15:42
Interesting thread, I`ll add my woes from two years ago. Constant stomach problems, Gaviscon after each meal, raw throat, stomach acid etc, the list went on. Doctor finally did a test for H Pylori Helicobacter and I was found to be positive. [Do a wiki search]. Treatment involves three types of strong antibiotics coupled with no alcohol for two weeks. Verdict- Pylori gone. Downside of all this- now I cannot take wine,dairy products and some vegetables and I have to take Omeprazole each day as well.

Maybe its worth some of you having an H pylori test.

racedo
9th Apr 2018, 18:36
Milk changes with the seaons especially when they are grass fed and not kept in sheds 24/7.

It means hay fever sufferers can get a double whammy in the spring time.

I know I suffer slightly when have too much dairy is build up of Cataarah like symptoms.

I moved away from having fresh milk at home about a decade ago and go for long life as the seasonal symptoms are killed by making it long life.

Fareastdriver
9th Apr 2018, 18:54
I went to the doctor with bloating and gastritis. We went through my normal diet and in the end I was advised to avoid milk, chocolate, ice cream, wine and spirits and only have two units of beer over the week-end.

The gastritis wasn't such a problem compared with that.

ricardian
9th Apr 2018, 19:06
Christmas 1961 and I was an 18 year old RAF lad fresh out of training and had been paid my Christmas credits (nearly £15). After an evening in the NAAFI drinking a mixture of Newcastle Brown, cheap whisky and even cheaper vodka I was very, very drunk. Next morning I had the mother of all hangovers which lasted for nearly 48 hours; a medic in our room suggested I had a form of alcohol poisoning and recommended drinking huge quantities of cold water. I eventually returned to normality but for the past 56 years I have been unable to tolerate any kind of distilled spirit, even the aroma from a glass of vodka or gin makes me gag & retch. Thankfully I can still drink beer & wine (in moderation!)

DaveReidUK
9th Apr 2018, 19:12
Strange you should mention Newcastle Brown - I couldn't drink it for nearly 10 years after an unfortunate student experience involving large quantities of it.

I'm cured now. :O

ExXB
9th Apr 2018, 20:17
Lots of chocolate doesn’t have milk in it. Even some without sugar or milk.

rans6andrew
9th Apr 2018, 21:52
Since I gave up dairy in all foods I have found that dairy free chocolate is nearly as bad for me. It started with a seriously rich dark chocolate tort at a pub on 10 March and then struck again when I was given a dairy free Easter egg last week, I only had a one bite of it.

I suspect that the dairy free regime is actually healthier as well as not causing the symptoms I had suffered from. As others have noted oat milk is a good substitute with breakfast cereals.

The thing I do miss though is cheese. I have got used to cheese free pizza, my other half has been dairy free for a long time and she has cracked the problem.

What can I put into my toasted sandwiches to keep them together? Melted cheese is a really good glue as well as a good flavouring ingredient. Crackers just don't work with anything else either.

Rans6...........................

M.Mouse
9th Apr 2018, 21:57
What is odd is that 50 years ago asthma, allergies, various intolerances were very unusual. I recall one friend at school who had asthma. He died from an asthma attack in his early twenties while training to be a doctor.

My girlfriend grew up in the Far East. About 12 years ago, while I was away on a trip, she work up in the middle of the night itching, feeling a tightness with her breathing and ended up being taken by ambulance to hospital. She had developed a nut allergy. Specifically peanuts but most nuts cause a reaction. That reaction has steadily become more rapid and more intense to the point where the other day someone who, unbeknown to her, had been eating peanuts typed using her PC keyboard and she reacted to that.

It is a PIA in restaurants because I always think we sound like prima donnas explaining a nut intolerance.

At the end of last summer my older sister was stung by a wasp. Ambulance to A & E followed having never suffered such a reaction on the rare occasion of being stung before.

Why have all manner of allergies and food intolerances become so prevalent (and real)?

Loose rivets
9th Apr 2018, 23:07
Interesting. Well, to me. I read the links in detail - thanks - but they only added to my awareness of the issues.

A wonderful teff grass bread made in Walton on the Naze ~2011 was not only nice, but left no trace whatsoever of the nasty feelings I get when I eat almost all wheat products.

As mentioned, an endoscopy and subsequent analysis gave a Non Celiac diagnosis, but that doesn't mean one is not intolerant to gluten. :ugh:

the hubby was able to narrow it down to the toothpaste they used. They swopped brands and no more problem.

Yep, in Texas I was getting afraid I was suffering a gum disease. I live in mortal fear of losing the remains of my once straight white teeth that now only serve to hold my fillings in. But gingivitis or some such seemed to be getting me. I couldn't bite on carrots or the like but thought, hang on, I'm allergic to soap, so stop using whitening toothpaste. After some weeks of deep concern, in two days I was fine. Sensodyne is all I can use, and only one type at that. (the green lid) I wrote to them in a similar manner to the wine people in CA. Unlike the wine people in CA, they responded kindly, though had little notion of folk like me. I'm now locked into their high prices, but grateful they're there. Over the years, intermittent attempts to go back to Colgate or the like very soon takes its toll.

I'll try to get in touch with the decorator guy I mentioned. Maybe he's got further than me in finding clues.

The real issue for me now is to find what is in gluten-free stuff that leaves a strong after-taste. I'm fairly convinced it's causing its own set of problems.


Anyway, 18 months to 80, so not long to have to put up with all this crap. :}

pulse1
10th Apr 2018, 11:08
What is it about fudge that makes it so different from, say, toffee.

I like them both too much but, while I can eat toffee all day, fudge causes huge digestion problems. I finally got this message late one evening a few years ago and I ate two pieces of fudge. Within 15 minutes or so I experienced all the indications of a heart attack with severe chest pains which went down my left arm. Mrs p1 called an ambulance which duly arrived along with a paramedic in a separate vehicle. By the time they arrived I had started to feel a bit better and a quick ECG showed that I had not had a heart attack.

A week ago I ate a small chocolate which turned out to have fudge in it. It was quite a small amount but even that started to give me slight, similar pain which lasted about 10 minutes or so.

The only difference I can see in fudge vs toffee is that fudge contains milk. But I can consume milk without any obvious problems. However, this thread is making me wonder if I might benefit from a milk free diet.

eko4me
10th Apr 2018, 14:05
IIRC, there is one sort of rotting fruit that elephants can't resist, and they gorge on the stuff, then end up intoxicated.


The fruit of the Marula Tree. Reports suggest that elephants preferentially seek out fermented fruit. South Africa makes a cream liqueur out of them - fruit that is, not elephants.

Fareastdriver
10th Apr 2018, 14:21
The fruit of the Marula Tree

Baboons go for those as well. One of the funniest things to witness is a troop of pi##ed baboons.

racedo
10th Apr 2018, 19:04
Baboons go for those as well. One of the funniest things to witness is a troop of pi##ed baboons.

If you have seen a bunch of Leeds United fans after they lost again, its pretty similar....................... just lacking the intelligence of the baboons.

VP959
10th Apr 2018, 19:08
The fruit of the Marula Tree. Reports suggest that elephants preferentially seek out fermented fruit. South Africa makes a cream liqueur out of them - fruit that is, not elephants.

Thanks for that, as it happens we seem to have a bottle of Amarula Liqueur in the kitchen cabinet. According to SWMBO, she bought it to make a dessert at Christmas a couple of years ago, but it must have been pretty good stuff as I can't remember it.

Odd thing is that it has a picture of an elephant on the label..........

racedo
10th Apr 2018, 22:10
It is a PIA in restaurants because I always think we sound like prima donnas explaining a nut intolerance.



Attending football abroad in Eastern European country a couple of years ago, friends son is Egg intolerant and peanut intolerant.

Asked at hotel restaurant and they sent the chef out. We didn't expect much............... chef perfectly well versed in it and meal was excellent. He had zero english and we had none of his language but google translate assisted.

Mr Optimistic
10th Apr 2018, 22:24
Perhaps you should all just fart more?

Dan Dare
10th Apr 2018, 23:32
Have you considered fecal transplant therapy?

reynoldsno1
11th Apr 2018, 23:17
Milk changes with the seaons especially when they are grass fed and not kept in sheds 24/7.
Many people visiting NZ have noticed this, presumably never having had milk from cows that eat grass. Cheese took the skin off the roof of my mouth when I were a nipper - my Mum used to give me a tiny cube to eat with every meal - after a year I had no problem with cheese. I recently retired - used to drink about 6 black coffees every morning - none after lunch. Stopped altogether apart from having a couple of cups recently on a Saturday morning - felt very peculiar. Never understood 'nut' allergies, especially since the usual suspect, the peanut, isn't actually a nut.