PDA

View Full Version : Hard to hear Newsreaders!!


GLIDER 90
4th Apr 2018, 22:40
Evening All

With watching the News Bulletins on various channels, have noticed some newsreaders drop their voice so low halfway through the news bulletins. That you can hardly hear what they are saying even through the volume is turned up. Is this a trend or a new fad this is quite irritating.

Glider 90

RedhillPhil
4th Apr 2018, 23:13
It's a trend. The same type of trend sees females talking in those croaky voices which is the result of - my late classical singing wife told me - of deliberately lowering the soft palate whilst speaking.

Loose rivets
5th Apr 2018, 02:11
I used to cry out at female Texas newsreaders - 60% of the sound comes out of their nose-holes. That's official. I supposed that comes from the office of fair nasal screeching. But how it used to grate. I came home to the UK and found the women here were tending to do the same.

Then I lost all quality of hearing. Something became nasty in my headbone and all, well, nearly all, was lost. But the Universe can be sadistic sometimes. I can hear on these barmy woman's frequencies but the sound is destroyed as though in a wooden box with metal bits loose on the side. Oh, and one ear hears tones at once frequency to the other. One is stuffed, but it doesn't stop there. The Rivetess insists upon talking even more softly than she used to.

Have you got your hearing aids? She'll say tomorrow when I go round for tea.

Last teatime together:

No, they only make the cacophony louder.

You need to go and get them.

So you don't care if I have louder cacophony bombarding my cerebral thingie?

She answered below the audibility of a bat.

Now she's talking with delicate fingers over her once enticing lips.

Don't hide your lips, I can't tell what your saying if you do.

You can't lip read, she says, in a challenging way.

I have to.

She then spends the next full minute articulating something in perfect silence. I suggested she'd said something about particle physics - for my benefit - but it was about not eating meat and baying at the moon. Oh, and something about existentialism. No, didn't pass the test.

So, you see I don't care much about newsreaders. I can't hear the telly much now anyway. I can hear Jean-Luc Picard, but then he always did speak nice. Maybe he's warping the sounds into by headbone. My neighbour gets his sound fix like that. A hundred grand it cost, you'll be pleased to know, but he can Bluetooth stuff from his car, phone, telly, oh, and his ears. Straight into the bone. Nifty. If I had the slightest inclination to hear what any woman was saying, I'd put me name down for one of those.

WingNut60
5th Apr 2018, 02:56
This all sounds like it has been excerpted from "Harrison Bergeron" or "Sirens of Titan" - Vonnegut

I have no problem with hiring ugly ones, in the spirit of equality, but hiring newsreaders with speech impediments is just plain dumb.

meadowrun
5th Apr 2018, 03:32
or hiring newsreaders with impeccable English under a totally incomprehensible accent.

BEagle
22nd Apr 2018, 20:29
Indeed - there's some wretched woman with an almost incomprehensible Northern (Leeds? 'Oomberside?) accent who reads the news on Oxfordshire's local radio station JackFM - the sort of ill-educated oik who says 'Haitch' for the capital letter H.

The radio doesn't provide sub titles, but sometimes I can barely make out what 't woman is saying, like....

jack11111
23rd Apr 2018, 02:48
A pair of higher-end headphones (US$ 150-200) makes a world of difference. Add a middle grade headphone amplifier and music becomes delightful. Use the line out on the TV, not the headphone jack due to low-fi output stages.

Krystal n chips
23rd Apr 2018, 04:10
Evening All

With watching the News Bulletins on various channels, have noticed some newsreaders drop their voice so low halfway through the news bulletins. That you can hardly hear what they are saying even through the volume is turned up. Is this a trend or a new fad this is quite irritating.

Glider 90

Have you thought of perhaps investing in a new ear trumpet ? . And do you have any particular news readers in mind whom you would care to show us as examples of your angst at all ?

Henyway, for those who har harpauled by not being hable to lisahn to the BBC Hame Sahveece, hand heven warse, hunhaware that there har different haccents harcrorse the UK, here's a soopah little bit horf norstalgeea hincluding a wefferarnce to a Carnty called Kint .


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dO6duGqC4bE

Mechta
23rd Apr 2018, 06:54
On the subject of hearing, what is it with the sound on inflight movies? Any background music is deafening, whilst anything spoken appears to be done from inside a paper bag. You would think they might at least once test the system with, firstly, the engines running, and secondly with someone over the age of 50.

A large proportion of Ppruners must be in the same boat as my father & uncle. Both spent the larger part of their lives around the aircraft of the 40s to 70s, and both say, 'If I can't see your lips, I can't hear you.' In my father's case, he did noise tests on the Fairey Gyrodyne, with only a leather flying helmet provided for ear protection. Having said that, my mother, who was an aerial photographer in a Dakota in the 50 & 60s, still has superb hearing. She can easily follow a conversation from another room.

What will happen with current generations remains to be seen. Nightclubs and concerts seem to get away with noise levels that would see a factory shut down instantly.

Ken Borough
23rd Apr 2018, 08:44
the sort of ill-educated oik who says 'Haitch' for the capital letter H.

Many Australians would resemble that remark! Pronouncing 'aitch' with a capital 'H' is quite common down here. Many would suggest that it's the mark of those educated within the Catholic school system but I would refute that PoV. Mrs B and I both attended Catholic schools while the off-spring attended "better" Catholic schools yet none of us say 'haitch'.

I find that some of the best educated in our midst say 'haitch' mbut I don't understand why. Those same people are often quite slovenly with their speech - maybe they simply hail from the other side of the tracks? Nothing more, nothing less.

Fareastdriver
23rd Apr 2018, 09:17
When I was in China I was with a group of Chinese students who were improving their spoken English by watching the BBC overseas programmes via satellite. They were doing very well but occasionally during the news programme they would have a report from the Middle East.

There is a BBC correspondent there who has a Irish accent. They couldn't understand a word she was saying.

Ken Borough
23rd Apr 2018, 09:25
Geoffrey Robertson, barrister of note and an Australian, has a very 'plummy' accent for an Australian. Apparently he had a speech impediment of some kind as a child and was required by his father to listen to the ABC News broadcasts to learn how to speak properly. In those days, our ABC aped the accents of their BBC colleagues.

jolihokistix
23rd Apr 2018, 11:42
For the past 15 years noise-cancelling headphones (and spare batteries) have been essential kit for me, for every flight. They seriously erase much background noise, which is great even when not plugged into the armrest, and they really do improve the sound quality of the motion pictures.
Just thinking of all the stress they cut out alleviates jet lag by around 75%.

sitigeltfel
23rd Apr 2018, 12:31
Many flat screen televisions have terrible rear facing speakers. Get a sound bar (mine is a Sony sound box) and you will be amazed at the improvement in clarity and sound quality.

Rossian
23rd Apr 2018, 22:40
......back in the '50s and '60s Red xxxxxxxx??? He used to do occasional items usually on Radio 4 about Oz. He had a deep gravelly voice - his missing name has been bugging me all the time I've been reading this thread. Help me out someone or I won't get to sleep tonight.

The Ancient Mariner

barry lloyd
23rd Apr 2018, 23:14
......back in the '50s and '60s Red xxxxxxxx??? He used to do occasional items usually on Radio 4 about Oz. He had a deep gravelly voice - his missing name has been bugging me all the time I've been reading this thread. Help me out someone or I won't get to sleep tonight.

The Ancient Mariner

Could it be Symons?

Loose rivets
23rd Apr 2018, 23:28
That's only 6 of the 8 letters

ethicalconundrum
23rd Apr 2018, 23:53
What grates me, and it seems universal is the singsongy wave of octaves that the FAs make on the pre-flight briefing. They go up, then they go down, then they go up,,,,, then they go down, then they go up --- pause, then they go down. I want to stick my fingers in my ears and just go 'la-la-la-la-la-la' for a while. Would get me tossed and drug off kicking and screaming.

Ascend Charlie
24th Apr 2018, 08:05
After 45 years in aviation my hearing is more like observing. Subtitles come in very handy for the TV, but they don't have subtitles for the air force reunion lunches, where I try my best to lip-read the person I want to hear in the drinking circle.

Loose Rivets, you perhaps missed Barry's reference to Red Symonds, who was a guitarist in an Oz rock band Skyhooks, and became a TV celebrity on Hey Hey It's Saturday.

Actually, Red could have been Raymond Reddington?

Pontius Navigator
24th Apr 2018, 11:16
What the mouths, many seem to speak through closed teeth so sounds remain inside. Also those foreign interviews or reports that start in Arabic, Germany or whatever, and then fade out as the translator kicks in. People who speak the Language can't follow the native report and others lose the beginning and middle bit.

Similarly where the interviewer is keener to get her viewpoint across than let the interviewee get a word in.

pax britanica
24th Apr 2018, 11:29
Very much at home in this thread- spending my first 20 years less than a mile from LHR southern runway it was inevitable I suppose that all those JT3s, Conways and Speys guaranteed that along with many others have hearing problems now we are 60 something.

In addition to some of grumbles mentioned here I dont think I am alone in being frustrated by dramas where people speak very quietly. Line of Duty being a good example where understandably there were some very soto voce conversations -of course in real life suspicion and mistrust is seldom shouted from the roof tops and may be whispered or muttered BUT its TV show for goodness sake not real life and viewers have to hear whats being said even if in reality it would be a murmur !

Pontius Navigator
24th Apr 2018, 13:13
PB, in real life I had a colleague 25 years ago who would lean in and whisper confidential gems in my ear.

His secrets were safe with me; never heard a word he said.

Tony Mabelis
24th Apr 2018, 14:14
On the subject of hard to hear television programmes, am I the only person to notice that a lot of programmes are so dark that you really can't see what is happening, Homeland and Shetland come to mind.
Tony

TLDNMCL
24th Apr 2018, 14:56
It's a trend. The same type of trend sees females talking in those croaky voices which is the result of - my late classical singing wife told me - of deliberately lowering the soft palate whilst speaking.

AAgghhh! Just about every woman below the age of about thirty five in and around London seems to have that trait. It sounds like they are just about to fall asleep, especially when they drag short words such as Dad or coat into a four second groan; bloomin' contrived copy-catting at it's worst...there, feel better now.

Rossian
24th Apr 2018, 15:52
.......in the wee small hours this AM it came to me like a bolt from the blue. If you google his name you'll find rather an interesting life. AND he had an aviation connection too. Very relieved I was at o'godoclock and subsided into a dreamless sleep until madame woke me with a cup of tea.

The Ancient Mariner

G-CPTN
24th Apr 2018, 15:54
bloomin' contrived copy-catting at it's worst...there, feel better now.

It's how humans learn to speak - which is why we had distinct regional accents - often settlement specific - though now folk respond to television for their dialect.

Pontius Navigator
24th Apr 2018, 15:55
On the subject of hard to hear television programmes, am I the only person to notice that a lot of programmes are so dark that you really can't see what is happening, Homeland and Shetland come to mind.
Tony
Have you been to Shetlands?

XV490
29th Apr 2018, 12:20
Indeed - there's some wretched woman with an almost incomprehensible Northern (Leeds? 'Oomberside?) accent who reads the news on Oxfordshire's local radio station JackFM - the sort of ill-educated oik who says 'Haitch' for the capital letter H.

The radio doesn't provide sub titles, but sometimes I can barely make out what 't woman is saying, like....

The BBC in Norwich has a reporter who likes to use his own brand of English - clip

The corporation's complaints team defended him by saying it's sometimes “appropriate to speak 'colloquially' rather than formally”.

Even if I agreed with that, this chap’s ‘estuarial’ vernacular is hardly likely to have impressed viewers in deepest Norfolk. He too, Beags, is known to have also uttered the grating 'haitch'.

Cat3508
30th Apr 2018, 05:47
The penchant of some Australians to pronounce "maroon" as "maroan" really annoys me, as does the pronunciation "haitch". Similarly, the interviewing of sportspeople, who have just finished whatever they were competing in, totally out of breath, trying to talk, combined with the crowd noise, makes the whole thing incomprehensible.

L'aviateur
10th May 2018, 23:49
Is this a case of hitting 60 and suddenly becoming a Victor Meldrew?

Loose rivets
11th May 2018, 00:10
"Wasn't no trains running." Oh, great, some trains running then?

. . . am I the only person to notice that a lot of programmes are so dark that you really can't see what is happening, Homeland and Shetland come to mind.

And you can't hear them? You sure you've got yer telly switched on. :8

WingNut60
11th May 2018, 00:31
Is this a case of hitting 60 and suddenly becoming a Victor Meldrew?

Don't think so. I've been like this birth.

crippen
11th May 2018, 03:27
To bring a bit of knowledge into this thread,the problem lies in digital sound. Unless you have a fast enough sampling rate,and a decent quantization analysis and a decent bit
rate you lose all the sybilants.google the 3 words
nines and fives become very difficult to discern S can disapear along with T,

ExSp33db1rd
12th May 2018, 02:32
.......nines and fives become very difficult

That's why we said Niner, and Fife, on the H.F. to Bombay ( and others )