PDA

View Full Version : Amazing flight


funfly
3rd Apr 2018, 10:16
In May 2017 a young male called Larry flew from Bowland in Lancashire and by 20th June he was 85km (50 miles) east of Reims, between the communes of Septsarges and Dannevouxis in the department of Meuse, France. He then flew on and by 22 June had reached the island of Punta Križa, off the coast of Croatia. On 7th. July he flew to the island of Cres, stopping close to the village of Punta Kriza.
During August 2017 he flew North into Poland but returned South and on 18 August was 700km (430 miles) to the south in eastern Croatia, he flew onwards to Montenegro.
On 23rd August 23 August Larry flew across the desert in western Egypt, close to the border with Libya, and had flown 2080km (1300 miles) south east from Montenegro. By the 29th. August he was flying over central Chad and he decided to stop in Chad for a while.
Larry left Chad in early November and flew to the Cuvette-Ouest region of Congo, not too far south-east from Victor in Gabon. He didn't stop here for long though and by the early afternoon of 11 November he was 760km (470 miles) further south in northern Angola where he had another stop-over.
In February this year Larry started his journey again and flew 280km (175 miles) northwards within Congo to the Odzala-Kokoua National Park, then Northwards over Nigeria.
At the present time Larry is continuing his flight and has been spotted over Ghana. One assumes that through the summer he will make his way back to the UK.
This is not the first time that Larry has made this round trip by air having certainly flown from the UK to Chad and back the previous year.

https://funfly.co.uk/images/larry.jpeg

https://www.bto.org/science/migration/tracking-studies/cuckoo-tracking/larry

TWT
3rd Apr 2018, 10:23
Not as amazing as the Arctic Tern's annual migration. 44-56,000 miles roundtrip.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arctic_tern

Sallyann1234
3rd Apr 2018, 11:28
I hope he doesn't try to overfly Malta on the way home. They shoot them down.

Bergerie1
3rd Apr 2018, 12:14
And the Bar-tailed Godwit flies even further!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bar-tailed_godwit

funfly
3rd Apr 2018, 12:21
Not as amazing as the Arctic Tern's
And the Bar-tailed Godwit flies even further!

It's not a competition. I just thought it was interesting. I've been following this cuckoo for nearly a year.

Mr Mac
3rd Apr 2018, 12:27
FUNFLY
I believe there has been some trackers put on Swifts and that these showed that they made the trip from West Africa to UK none stop in 3 weeks. Swifts apparently live on the wing and even sleep on the wing hence quick journey times. We are lucky to have Swifts and Swallows in our barns here in Yorkshire and indeed I am looking forward to seeing our first Swallows back around 8th - 16th April with the Swifts following usually in early May. Swifts stay until late August early September with Swallows leaving mid September. We always look forward to seeing them arrive and really do not like their departure as a harbinger of autumn / winter. Sometimes the Swallows on arrival when viewed with field glasses seem stained ochre if there has been a lot of Saharan dust in the atmosphere, a bit like some long haul jets get travel stained.


Kind regards
Mr Mac

Loose rivets
3rd Apr 2018, 12:42
I've been following this cuckoo for nearly a year.

I've the greatest respect for my elders, but shouldn't you be taking it easy at your age?

funfly
3rd Apr 2018, 16:02
If you were younger, Mr. Rivets, you would know that ‘following’ does not involve any physical activity at all, simple getting stuff from the screen all of which is absolutely true (?).
It’s a bit like having ‘friends’ none of which you have actually seen or spoken to face to face.
I am thinking about having my office chair replaced by a commode then I wouldn’t need to leave the screen at all.

funfly
3rd Apr 2018, 16:04
However, I was in Chad once, many years ago, and if you would read my latest book Reflections of a Business Traveller in 1970s Africa and other stories which is free on Kindle unlimited, you could read all about it.

Tankertrashnav
3rd Apr 2018, 22:43
Absolutely fascinating Funfly. I was puzzled by the diversion up to Poland but your link explained it. Always good to be reminded that other species have worked out ways to deal with with all sorts of problems, and that how they do it is still pretty much inexplicable to us.

Mr Mac
4th Apr 2018, 12:22
Funfly
Your no relation to Peter Biddlecombe (author various travel books) are you, as he spent many happy years commuting around Africa around then.

Kind regrads
Mr Mac

Cremeegg
4th Apr 2018, 12:34
I saw the thread title and I thought it was more publicity for a certain lady aviatrix who it is alleged flies solo.

TURIN
4th Apr 2018, 12:43
Sometimes the Swallows on arrival when viewed with field glasses seem stained ochre if there has been a lot of Saharan dust in the atmosphere, a bit like some long haul jets get travel stained.

What do you mean, African or European? :E

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w8Rn_f75UHs

funfly
4th Apr 2018, 13:49
Funfly
Your no relation to Peter Biddlecombe (author various travel books) are you, as he spent many happy years commuting around Africa around then.

Kind regrads
Mr Mac

Sadly no,
My adventures in writing, although resulting in a number of books, clearly demonstrates my role in life with many of the hobbies I have and continue to have, in that my enthusiasm greatly exceeds my talents.
My deepest disappointment is that age has not given me wisdom, I was expecting to know it all by now! Opinions - yes, wisdom - little.

NutLoose
4th Apr 2018, 14:34
You think that is staggering

https://www.york.ac.uk/news-and-events/features/painted-lady-migration/

Bergerie1
4th Apr 2018, 16:06
funfly, NutLoose and TWT,

I am not trying to provoke a competition, I am just amazed by the wonders of migration. See this about the albatross. I have spent hours watching them in the Southern ocean:-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=toJwBgjCZMI

Bergerie1
6th Apr 2018, 14:46
And here is another amazing migration story:-

https://www.york.ac.uk/news-and-events/features/painted-lady-migration/