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chips101
28th Mar 2018, 19:09
I'm bored of constant reference to twitter. Stop looking to twitter to the job for you.

Gertrude the Wombat
28th Mar 2018, 19:13
They don't, though, do they, or they would have reported that the twiterrati have been somewhat worked up for some time about BBC bias on #brexit.

vapilot2004
28th Mar 2018, 20:25
You think you've got problems...The cousins wish a certain someone had his tweeter cutoff.

tartare
28th Mar 2018, 22:27
If I may humbly offer an observation as a former scumbag journalist and employee of Aunty.
When I first were a junior scribe - the edge of the wave of breaking news was radio.
Quick, responsive - you spent your day in the newsroom watching radio wires feeds on screen to make sure the [email protected] didn't gazump you with a new angle or development - and cursing, or being cursed at when they did.
The general pattern back then was (usually), light, fast radio broke the story or provided latest updates, lumbering behemoth television came along and told everyone about it at the end of the day, and then slow and detailed print did the analysis (accepting of course that other mediums would also break stories or gazump each other from time to time).
Now it's all changed.
We're not in the era of 24 hour news as the general public refers to it - in the trade, and certainly at Aunty, it is known as continuous news,
Twitter is where news breaks, where new angles surface. It happens minute by minute, and is contributed to by experts, journalists, pundits and every manner of fvcker with an opinion.
Trouble and strife, who is an Editor at SBS here in Oz is a Twitter addict. She has all manner of people from all over the world that she follows - many of whom are deep subject matter experts.
I'm continually amazed at the speed at which she can put her finger on detailed informed comment within minutes on major issues - all from Twitter.
If you're a journo today Twitter is where it is at - it is impossible to ignore and any journo doing their job properly would be a fool to do so.
So while I think I understand the sentiment behind the original statement - I would humbly suggest that by looking to Twitter, they absolutely are doing their job.
And personally - I'm glad I'm not still in a newsroom, struggling to keep up with the second by second assault of new information from all sides.

flash8
28th Mar 2018, 23:34
You can point to twitter to support any argument....

How do you think a lot of their narratives are twisted? And to think many years ago it was a reputable organization. Now it is just a state (read Tory) mouthpiece.

tartare
28th Mar 2018, 23:54
Twitter is just like any other online platform.
Critical thinking needs to be used to sort information likely to be reputable - from inflammatory idiocy.
And if the BBC could fairly be described as biased in any one direction (which in itself is debatable) it would probably be centre-left - knowing my former colleagues' predilections... as I've said here many times before - in my view it still is a reputable organisation - and you pongolians are very lucky to have it.
Now - if you really, genuinely want an example of media bias - keep an eye on the ABC down here from time to time.
Some outstanding program strands excepted - it's a shocker...

UniFoxOs
29th Mar 2018, 06:51
I don't understand twitter. If I were the expert on any subject why would I want to tell the world all about it? Anybody who relies on twitter for news and info is not going to get any input from people who think as I do, only from people who think they are experts and want to show off.

KelvinD
29th Mar 2018, 06:58
I think the OP is right. It is something that annoys me greatly.
Examples are, on my "home" page (Hampshire & Isle of Wight);
"South Western Railway Easter weekend engineering works"
View more on Twitter
"Thatched hotel staff thank firefighters for 'saving' building
View more on Twitter
"Berkshire firefighter retires after 30 years"
View more on Twitter.
If I wanted to get my news from Twitter, I would join that and forget the BBC.

Katamarino
29th Mar 2018, 07:04
I'd understand it if they concentrated on a few Twitter quotes from subject matter experts, but the majority of their articles seem to be "Here's what hairdresser Nicole, 32, from Basingstoke had to say on Twitter on the subject of Russian Nerve agents".

Why would anyone care?

VP959
29th Mar 2018, 07:47
I'd understand it if they concentrated on a few Twitter quotes from subject matter experts, but the majority of their articles seem to be "Here's what hairdresser Nicole, 32, from Basingstoke had to say on Twitter on the subject of Russian Nerve agents".

Why would anyone care?

And that highlights the major problem with using social media as a reliable news source. There are, I'm sure, some reliable subject matter experts on social media generally, but equally there will be a lot of SMEs who either don't use social media, or are not permitted to by their employers, as a part of the terms of employment.

Then there is the problem of how to tell who is really a reliable source and who is just spouting BS that seems as if it might be reliable. Look at the times some of the prominent Twitter users in positions of power or authority have been caught out by not recognising unreliable sources on social media.

Even last night I was listening to a breaking news story and a supposed SME was spouting BS, and yet even the mighty BBC were taking what was being said as being from a reliable source.

I suspect the biggest problem the few honest journos around have (if "honest journo" isn't an oxymoron now) is trying to filter through tons of complete crap from social media to find the fraction of 1% that might posibly contain a nugget of truth.

Laarbruch72
29th Mar 2018, 08:09
No, Tartare is right; I too get the OP sentiment to a point, but:
News agencies and all sorts of other entities have to be reliant on the likes of Twitter and similar social media platforms because that's simply how news breaks now... times move on and it's only a luddite that would begrudge a news agency from using media like this to their (and ultimately, our) advantage.

My company (like many others, including the BBC I'd bet) uses a product called Dataminr - To sum up what that is in a few words, I'll use their own blurb which states that: "Dataminr senses critical events as they happen and alerts professionals in news, finance, public sector, corporate security, and communications faster than traditional sources." What that means in plain English is that their programme analyses social media for key words and activities, and sends you an alert that something bad may be going down at say, Borough Market, often within about 1 minute of the first tweets coming in. That can give you a good hour's heads up that something might be happening and it's then up to you to start your information gathering / sorting from traditional sources to come up with a confirmed version, usually about an hour before an agency like the police releases a statement. You could have someone on scene by then, and that's ultimately down to say, 5 twitter users who said there were guys running around with knives. It can cause you a few false starts on occasion (vehicles backfiring are usually a good source of muliple tweets reporting "gunfire"!) but so long as you do proper follow up it's generally clear within minutes.

I'm not so keen on seeing "expert analysis" via Twitter, or even (God forbid) international politics and diplomacy being done via Twitter, that's very poor (and lazy use) of what is actually the wrong platform in the first place. But it is a great tool for finding out what's happening as fast as is humanly possible, and the BBC and other news agencies are right to exploit it.

Grayfly
29th Mar 2018, 08:13
I always worked on the principle in my work life that if you pay me I'll pass on my researched knowledge. If you don't want to pay me I will only give you my opinion.

The whole social media world is basically just opinion, marketing or propaganda. Each one has a place, but can't be classed as news.

The BBC and most other TV news stations are mainly infotainment outlets. The Pareto principle applies, possibly 20% fact but 80% entertainment. Sadly some people can't or won't know the difference, including the editorial teams.

I do use social media, but mainly for marketing purposes.

TURIN
29th Mar 2018, 08:22
I don't understand twitter. If I were the expert on any subject why would I want to tell the world all about it? Anybody who relies on twitter for news and info is not going to get any input from people who think as I do, only from people who think they are experts and want to show off.

Pprune is full of people telling everyone (well, anyone who cares to listen) their 'expert' opinion.

Including you and I (probably) :O

Gertrude the Wombat
29th Mar 2018, 11:28
And if the BBC could fairly be described as biased
A dead giveaway that the BBC is no longer remotely what it was is the recent invention of the "Reality Check". Reasonably well hidden on obscure corners of the web site, this occasionally does a little investigation into whether one of the big stories they've been running for days or weeks is actually true or not.

Once Upon A Time the truth or otherwise of a story would have been explored, challenged, as a routine "mainstreamed" part of putting the story out, not as something rarely done and hidden in a corner for the few nerds who actually care about truth.

cattletruck
29th Mar 2018, 11:29
#hashtag - what a weird concept (to me). As someone who worked with one of the developers of the Twitter system when it was still beta, I noticed he saw the fun in the challenge of writing short messages, but I'm sure he never would have predicted the success of the #hashtag phenomena which was only meant to be a simple kind of shortcut.

sitigeltfel
29th Mar 2018, 13:13
Twitter is such a lovely place..

https://order-order.com/2018/03/29/kinder-gentler-politics-latest/

:rolleyes:

UniFoxOs
29th Mar 2018, 16:19
Including you and I (probably)

Well most of what I write is my opinion - opinions are like arseholes - everybody has one. But I try not to pass off my opinions as facts. Twitter is electronic gossip - just as likely to be BS as truth, IMO.

Krystal n chips
30th Mar 2018, 05:41
Twitter can be quite, well, heart rending at times.

We can only hope and pray madam doesn't suffer any long term trauma after her ordeal and may, eventually, discover that cars ending up on a railway line, rather than staying on the road, are not an everyday occurrence hence railway lines don't have passing loops every 100 yds to enable trains to simply nip round obstructions on the track and that, irrespective of how and why it did so, the car had another human being inside whose needs at the time would be considerably more pressing than her own.

Brampton railway line blocked by crashed car - BBC News (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-43590138)

Fark'n'ell
30th Mar 2018, 06:39
Passengers struck on trains or platforms have tweeted that their trains have been delayed and they have been unable to get information.

Passengers on strike?Unbelievable

funfly
30th Mar 2018, 08:49
The funny fact is that in our own social media, pPrune, where many of us look a couple of times a day, I would suggest that the majority of us are critical of twitter people. That makes us a bit hypocritical really.

VP959
30th Mar 2018, 08:55
The funny fact is that in our own social media, pPrune, where many of us look a couple of times a day, I would suggest that the majority of us are critical of twitter people. That makes us a bit hypocritical really.

It does, but this is a much smaller community, and I doubt many journos take any note of JB, they are probably all focussed on R&N :suspect:

funfly
30th Mar 2018, 13:49
And, let's face it, we are a far more sophisticated bunch of people anyway!