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dook
16th Mar 2018, 18:55
A plane is a tool used by carpenters or anyone else working with wood.

A flying machine which has fixed wings is an aeroplane.

Got it ?

Highway1
16th Mar 2018, 18:58
So what is an airplane?

charliegolf
16th Mar 2018, 19:04
I'm gong to the shed to get my plane.
I'm going to the airport to catch my 'plane.

Confused? Life is probably not that easy for you day to day.

CG

VP959
16th Mar 2018, 19:04
So what is an airplane?

An American version of an aeroplane?

FAR CU
16th Mar 2018, 19:22
Either 'airplane' grates on the English ear more attuned to Shakespeare than to Seinfeld , as might equally 'mom' or 'bathroom' ("this airplane has six bathrooms. . . ") or it is unkydory along with all other corruptions of a language continually changing. (At the same time, beware of Weasel Words - google Don Watson- Weasel Words.)

k3k3
16th Mar 2018, 19:27
Aeronautical, not Airnautical.

Lonewolf_50
16th Mar 2018, 19:28
A plane is defined by three points not on the same line.

Sallyann1234
16th Mar 2018, 19:28
A plane is a tool used by carpenters or anyone else working with wood.

A flying machine which has fixed wings is an aeroplane.

Got it ?
Not again! :ugh:
Why do people keep coming up with this rubbish?

Dictionaries vary with their definitions, but Chambers for instance lists the following :

plane1 /plān/
noun
A surface of which it is true that, if any two points on the surface be taken, the straight line joining them will lie entirely on the surface (geometry)
Any flat or level material surface
One of the thin horizontal structures used as wings and tail to sustain or control aeroplanes in flight
Short for aeroplane or airplane (also 'plane)
An act of planing or soaring
In mines, a main road for the transport of coal or other mineral
Any grade of life or of development or level of thought or existence
adjective
Having the character of a plane
Relating to, lying in, or confined to a plane
Level
Smooth
transitive verb
To make plane or smooth (see also plane2)

intransitive verb
To travel by aeroplane
To soar
To volplane
(of a boat) to skim across the surface of the water

Also, carpenters are not the only users of tools called planes. Other materials are worked with planes. Try Googling 'metal planer' for instance.

dook
16th Mar 2018, 20:03
So what is an airplane?

Yank speak.

Same as "disorient".

Ethel the Aardvark
16th Mar 2018, 20:09
One having a float airplane license sounds odd as opposed to a floatplane license

vapilot2004
16th Mar 2018, 20:20
How many syllables are in the word that is the stuff most aeroplanes are made of? Four or five?

VP959
16th Mar 2018, 20:21
One having a float airplane license sounds odd as opposed to a floatplane license

The relevant wording in my license in the ratings section reads:

Aeroplanes (Seaplanes/Amphibians) as defined in the Air Navigation Order for the time being in force

So it seem that as far as the CAA are concerned the word is Aeroplane............

DB6
16th Mar 2018, 20:25
Plane, aeroplane, who cares?
NUCULAR on the other hand........:mad:

NutLoose
16th Mar 2018, 20:26
Bi aeroplane sounds wrong, biplane doesn't, same goes for monoplane and mono aeroplane also for triplane and tri aeroplane.

Chronus
16th Mar 2018, 20:38
On this thread it`d be a flat surface,unless its called hairplane.

TURIN
16th Mar 2018, 20:54
De-plane.

What is wrong with disembark?

vapilot2004
16th Mar 2018, 21:01
De plane! De plane!

hiflymk3
16th Mar 2018, 21:12
A plane is a tool used by carpenters or anyone else working with wood.

A flying machine which has fixed wings is an aeroplane.

Got it ?
Yep! It's plain to see.

Chronus
16th Mar 2018, 21:27
De-plane.

What is wrong with disembark?

First one- ambigious, could also translate in Jamaican or Jerman to The plane.

Second - confusing, command to dog stop barking.

ZOOKER
16th Mar 2018, 21:30
Are our American contributors licenced to to discuss 'planes' in this neighbourhood....At this time of night?

Super VC-10
16th Mar 2018, 22:21
A plane is either a woodworking tool, or a tree in the genus platanus.

TWT
16th Mar 2018, 22:40
Pointless thread.

The notion that 'my word is correct and yours isn't' even though they're used in different countries is ludicrous.

Tankertrashnav
16th Mar 2018, 22:52
How many syllables are in the word that is the stuff most aeroplanes are made of? Four or five?

Five of course, vapilot, Or is it four? ;)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yX5y4PPk1Zk

funfly
16th Mar 2018, 23:34
It's an AIRCRAFT

However;
When I was very young we lived by South Cerney Drome which we sometimes called 'the Camp' and watched the Planes take off.

WingNut60
16th Mar 2018, 23:35
How many syllables are in the word that is the stuff most aeroplanes are made of? Four or five?

For an interesting precis have a look at Aluminum versus Aluminium: Where did that come from? ? World's Fair (http://scienceblogs.com/worldsfair/2009/04/08/aluminum-versus-aluminium-wher/)

FAR CU
16th Mar 2018, 23:54
By the way -

The bicentenary of the invention of the concept of the aeroplane by the Yorkshire baronet,
Sir George Cayley (1773-1857), occurred in
1999. The year 2004 saw the bicentenary of
two further major achievements by Cayley, namely the first measurement of wing lift and,
more dramatically, the flight of the world’s first aeroplane. Both advances occurred in the
year before Trafalgar and, like the invention itself, took place near the Yorkshire coastal
town of Scarborough. However, in the year 2003 we celebrated the centenary of that
tremendous achievement, the first powered, controllable flights by the Wright brothers.

From a paper delivered by JAD Ackroyd of the Aerospace Division of the Manchester school of engineering.

galaxy flyer
17th Mar 2018, 00:01
It's an AIRCRAFT

However;
When I was very young we lived by South Cerney Drome which we sometimes called 'the Camp' and watched the Planes take off.


Oh, no, it’s not! An “aircraft” is any type of flying machine; an airplane is a flying machine using fixed wings to sustain flight. In the USAF, we used aircraft for years, until I got in the C-5, where instructors beat “it’s an AIRPLANE” into us. After 10 years in TAC and fighters, I was astounded it made this much matter.

GF

charliegolf
17th Mar 2018, 00:13
De-plane.

What is wrong with disembark?

Wouldn't have the same ring on, 'Fantasy Island'. Nope.:=

CG

FullOppositeRudder
17th Mar 2018, 01:25
Aircraft is the preferred term in my life experience, although the broader context is noted and acknowledged. 'Round here, other sub species are identified by their 'uniqueness' eg Helicopter, Glider, Balloon, Hang Glider Paraglider .....

Sorry though, 'Airplane" is out - never heard it used by the locals anywhere in Australia ... Too much damage already being inflicted on the lingo by overseas sources.... We should resist this one at all costs.... :E

FOR

Ascend Charlie
17th Mar 2018, 01:36
"The passengers were emplaned" in England,
but in Murrica "The passengers were emairplaned."

The passengers who had already deplaned were actually explaned.

Funny how the Murrican computer game calls it X-Plane innit?

FAR CU
17th Mar 2018, 04:01
ERNEST K GANN , no less, in 'Fate is the Hunter', varies his terminology, but never once does he use the term that many prefer, but for others is cause to wince , as with a gaucherie. (Anyone who is a student of his writings, or is familiar with his autobiography, knows EKG was as American as Kellogg's Cornflakes.)

So you will find him simply using the aircraft's correct type designator, such as DC-6 or C-87. Sometimes he says 'ship' and sometimes he says 'plane'. More often than not he sees no need to insert an unnecessary noun, because in context the narrative does not need it. The men whom he chronicles so accurately and convincingly could be no where else but in an aeroplane. He does use 'aeroplane' on pages 184 and 347 of the original Hodder and Stoughton edition of February 1961.

meadowrun
17th Mar 2018, 04:26
I use "kapalterbang".
Indonesian, IIRC
Has a nice ring.

Ascend Charlie
17th Mar 2018, 06:11
If you want it plane and simple, use the Pidgin "Balus".

WingNut60
17th Mar 2018, 06:35
I use "kapalterbang".
Indonesian, IIRC
Has a nice ring.

Correct, but as with airplane / aeroplane, there are variations also on kapal terbang. That expression is a little bit dated in Indonesia.
May be more current in Malay.

Hempy
17th Mar 2018, 06:38
“That’s an aircraft or an aeroplane son. You shave wood with a f#%\!&g plane”

Bull at a Gate
17th Mar 2018, 07:12
Who cares? Has anyone ever bought a woodworking tool, or a tree, or a flat surface by mistake?

ORAC
17th Mar 2018, 08:00
Aircraft surely?

“1850, air-craft, in the writings of John Wise, originally in reference to balloons, from air (n.1) + craft (n.). An image from boating, as were many early aviation words. Of airplanes from 1907 and since 1930s exclusively of them. Aircraft carrier is attested from 1919, in reference to H.M.S. Hermes, launched September 1919, the first ship built from the hull up as an aircraft carrier.”....

As for plane as an abbreviation for airplane - a British invented contraction, and within months of the original word being coined.

“plane in the sense of “winged vehicle,” first recorded in April 1908, is a shortened form of aeroplane. In June of that year plane appeared in a quotation from the London Times that mentioned one of the Wright brothers.“.....

Aeroplane, from the French, originated about 60 years before.

https://www.etymonline.com/word/aeroplane

Pinky the pilot
17th Mar 2018, 08:13
If you want it plane and simple, use the Pidgin "Balus".

Em nau!:ok::D

vapilot2004
17th Mar 2018, 09:43
Five of course, vapilot, Or is it four? ;)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yX5y4PPk1Zk

That's great, Tankertrashnav!

I think it's both, and apparently it's five for the high grade stuff. ;)

Thank you Wingnut for the link. :ok:

I've always been a bit mystified, particularly since it is an element, and we do share a common language, although at times, one can wonder. Noah Webster, you misled us!

goudie
17th Mar 2018, 10:14
In the RAF we erks used to refer to aircraft as ‘kites’. Was very much frowned upon by the pilots, “aeroplane laddie, aeroplane!”

DaveReidUK
17th Mar 2018, 10:19
an airplane is a flying machine using fixed wings to sustain flight

Almost, but not quite.

Gliders and sailplanes satisfy your definition, but they are neither airplanes nor aeroplanes, whose definition requires them to be powered.

treadigraph
17th Mar 2018, 11:01
An aeroplane definitely ain't no ship... but I suppose an airship is.

sitigeltfel
17th Mar 2018, 11:23
"Heavier than air flying machine."

There, sorted!

Tigger_Too
17th Mar 2018, 11:34
What is wrong with disembark?

"disembark"? Nahh. "debark" Sir!

DaveReidUK
17th Mar 2018, 11:49
"Heavier than air flying machine."

There, sorted!

No - as previously pointed out, that includes several categories that certainly aren't aeroplanes.

radar101
17th Mar 2018, 12:11
NUCULAR on the other hand........:mad:



I once phoned up my local radio station and asked them to tell the young newsreader that every time she said NUCULAR she sounded like George W Bush.


She stopped!!

Cunliffe
17th Mar 2018, 12:25
A biplane is an aeroplane with two wings so a 747 is a biplane. Just simple logic.

DaveReidUK
17th Mar 2018, 12:32
A biplane is an aeroplane with two wings so a 747 is a biplane. Just simple logic.

And by the same logic, a sesquiplane should fly round and round in ever-decreasing circles. :O

Dan Dare
17th Mar 2018, 13:10
I thought that in the modern world we had “Air Systems” rather than aircraft, aeroplanes, airplanes, planes, (helicopters) etc. Or is that just the RAF?

Haraka
17th Mar 2018, 20:37
There are two basic families.
Aerostats . Those that require no movement through the air to remain airborne,such as balloons and dirigibles (i.e. steerable airships). Many Americans of course inanely assume tethered balloons are the only "aerostats"
Aerodynes. (Aerodynamics anybody?) those that require a lifting surface to have powered movement, directly or indirectly through the air. Aeroplanes, Helicopters and Gyroplanes are included.
Sailplanes are a third category.( i.e. not aeroplanes or rotorcraft)

"Airplane" is of course an etymological nonsense from the same New World origins as those who also incorrectly presume to define "Aerostat".

57mm
17th Mar 2018, 21:04
What about aircraft?

G-CPTN
17th Mar 2018, 21:11
G-INFO describes G-AWSY as 'FIXED-WING LANDPLANE'.

DaveReidUK
17th Mar 2018, 21:16
Everything that flies is an aerostat or aerodyne. Gliders and sailplanes, by virtue of the fact that they are heavier-than-air, are aerodynes.

ORAC
17th Mar 2018, 21:48
“When I use a word,” Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, “it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less.” “The question is,” said Alice, “whether you can make words mean so many different things.” “The question is,” said Humpty Dumpty, “which is to be master—that's all.”“

DaveReidUK
17th Mar 2018, 23:25
The Fairey Rotodyne is an aircraft, an aerodyne and a rotorcraft.

As is every helicopter and gyrocopter, of course.

Martin the Martian
18th Mar 2018, 22:45
While we're at it, how about going back to the word 'aerodrome' rather than 'airfield'?

DaveReidUK
18th Mar 2018, 23:59
While we're at it, how about going back to the word 'aerodrome' rather than 'airfield'?

M-5DeIvOJ7Y

evansb
19th Mar 2018, 04:45
Any hippos at a hippodrome? Could be, especially in ancient Rome, given that the hippopotamus is related to the horse. Any "aero" at an aerodrome? Sure, there are plenty of aeroplanes, aerostats and aerodynes at an aerodrome. Any "air" over an airfield? Sure, there is plenty of air at an airfield, even in low density altitude conditions. Velodrome? Plenty of "velos". Just saying.

megan
19th Mar 2018, 08:24
A plane is a tool used by carpenters or anyone else working with wood.

A flying machine which has fixed wings is an aeroplane.

Got it ? What is a "Plane Captain"? He/she does exist. Ten points to the correct answerer.

Car RAMROD
19th Mar 2018, 08:35
With your best impression of Cletus from the Simpsons to get the tone just right..

Aerial vee-hickle

Clop_Clop
19th Mar 2018, 08:35
So all in all instead of aeroplane or airplane with can simply say: aerocraft, if we are not sure which one to use?

A kite is in fact belonging to a category of marine propulsion systems rather than anything to do with aircraft! In other words not a flying machine nor an airplane.

ORAC
19th Mar 2018, 10:42
Velodrome? Plenty of "velos". Just saying. Velocipedes if you please.....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Velocipede

Haraka
19th Mar 2018, 10:56
A flying machine which has fixed wings is an aeroplane.

Unless it is unpowered.

Got it? :)

Saintsman
19th Mar 2018, 11:01
And whilst we are on this subject, Flight Deck on an airliner, not a cockpit. Cockpits are found in smaller aircraft.

TURIN
19th Mar 2018, 12:16
Douglas Bader knew.


1:29:40


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qVuqUqiq0DE

jez d
19th Mar 2018, 13:42
The relevant wording in my license in the ratings section reads...

License is a verb. Licence, the noun. :ok:

Is the Ponitff's 'Shepherd One' a Spiritual Plane?

Helmet, goggles, kite...

funfly
19th Mar 2018, 14:45
Is it 'Plain' sailing or 'Plane' sailing?
Hat, coat etc....

treadigraph
19th Mar 2018, 14:54
Is it 'Plain' sailing or 'Plane' sailing?
Hat, coat etc....

Depends whether you own a Catalina or not...

TURIN
19th Mar 2018, 15:17
Is it 'Plain' sailing or 'Plane' sailing?
Hat, coat etc....

Erm...?:confused:


https://www.octuri.com/en/aircraft-of-the-future/flying-yacht/

ORAC
19th Mar 2018, 16:14
Depends whether you own a Catalina or not... Or a Conestoga......

ehwatezedoing
19th Mar 2018, 17:18
A plane is a tool used by carpenters or anyone else working with wood.

A flying machine which has fixed wings is an aeroplane.

Got it ?

Do you use hanger to store your plane? :p