PDA

View Full Version : B.T. Broadband.


RedhillPhil
15th Mar 2018, 13:22
I wonder if I may call upon the collective's advice.
For the last 24 hours my broadband at home (I'm typing this on a machine at the library) will not connect. A frustrating call to B.T. has resulted in a statement from them that as the line to the bungalow is in working order - as evidenced by my working telephone - the equipment within the bungalow must be at fault. An engineer of either the B.T. variety or an approved contractor is going to cost a multiplicity of pounds. The fault is suggested to be the hub thingy - that is, the interface between the computer and the telephone line. If I want a new one I will have to pay for it as it's over twelve months old and out of warranty. However, when the contract (important word that) is up in September they'd be happy to send me a replacement gratis. My suggestion that as I have a contract with them to supply broadband - which they patently cannot as their equipment has apparently malfunctioned - so they should replace the duff one with a replacement was met with silence.


What does the team think as regards what my next move might be?
Yours gratefully, annoyed of Alverton.
Phil.

WilliumMate
15th Mar 2018, 13:42
Phil, I found this if it is any use.

https://community.bt.com/t5/ADSL-Copper-broadband/Ownership-of-BT-homehub/td-p/1684605

Groundbased
15th Mar 2018, 13:44
Ah I had a very similar issue. I had a Home Hub 5 and fibre broadband. It basically kept dropping the connection and became very flaky. After a "line test" that meant 48 continuous hours without connection they told me the hub was finished and I needed a new one.

Then it got interesting. Apparently the contract for the broadband was separate from the one for the TV etc. I was out of contract on the broadband so they were going to charge me £60 for a new router, which would be a Home Hub 6. After a long conversation we agreed that they would send me another Hub 5 and not charge me for it.

As you've guessed a Hub 6 duly arrived and I have to say it solved all the problems. I rang them and pointed out that they had sent me a Hub 6 but they said that was OK. Of course on my next bill a £60 charge appeared, however I phoned them up and they refunded that.

Their record of service calls is actually quite good and you can see a lot of it on your My BT account. It helps when having a "this was previously agreed" conversation.

If you've got a Hub 5 perhaps a conversation along the "send me another Hub 5 and don't charge for it" might get the ball rolling.

B Fraser
15th Mar 2018, 13:52
I am sure I have a spare hub in a box somewhere, PM me a phone number and I'll give you a call.

treadigraph
15th Mar 2018, 13:55
Friend's BT Broadband went down but his phone worked. BT engineer checked connections in the house, tried a new hub, couldn't fix it and went away to ponder. I suggested he get them to check the cabinet up the road; bingo, problem there, all quickly fixed. No idea why they couldn't have immediately figured this themselves.

My mum had Broadband; when parts of Purley were flooded four or five years ago, her telephone stopped working until everything dried out but the Broadband remained connected.

Bill16STN
15th Mar 2018, 14:24
I ended up putting my BT Home Hub in the bin - useless thing :ugh:
Replaced it with an Apple Airport Extreeme & no problems or issues since (about two years!) :ok:

Just goes to show that you do get what you pay for! :D

beamer
15th Mar 2018, 14:36
Our village was abandoned by BT with regard to fibre optic coverage. They did a deal with the County Council and a third party provider despite the majority wanting to stay with BT which would have remained a cheaper option for a largely elderley community. Speeds are still rubbish 0.5 to 3.5. We are right next to a main road along which BT ducting runs to the main exchange, so all they have to do is a bit of work at both ends. Appalling service.

Ancient Observer
15th Mar 2018, 15:51
HUACA?
I had a hub 3 or 4. The general opinion on t'net was that 5 was not very good. I waited until 6 had had some good reviews, and phoned up. I was not near contract end.
Prices given to me by their "sales" people were all over the place.
One lady offered me a 6 for £40. I took it. They only charged me 40, although others had said over 100.
Crazy.

Kiltrash
15th Mar 2018, 16:07
Not BT but Beardy Bransons company
TV work ok as did the landline but no wi fi

Line was tested all good. engineer came(free) and the problem was slugs and snails in the connection box on the outside walls

He cleaned the cobwebs and snails, re made the connections and all great again

Buster15
15th Mar 2018, 16:18
Many similar problems with bt made me decide to change to Virgin. A much better service and at a much lower price. Fault are rectified at no cost.
Threaten bt with a change and if you are not satisfied then change supplier. That is my best advice.

treadigraph
15th Mar 2018, 16:26
Mum had Virgin phone and TV for a bit - the phone line kept going down, apparently the soldered connection in their cabinet would break every time they fixed somebody else's.

After about five or six breakages with the phone dead for a few days each time, I spoke to them and pointed out she was very elderly and a working phone line was vital for her children's peace of mind - so she was going back to BT.

"But she can't, she's signed up to a year's contract!"

"A contract works both ways - you agreed to supply a working phone line and it has proved unfit for purpose - adios!"

Apart from the flooding incident which was beyond their control, she never had a problem with BT.

Fareastdriver
15th Mar 2018, 16:29
The obvious is sometimes impossible. Our telephone would not work but the broadband did. After a multitude of tests the engineer came out and he couldn't find the reason either. His diagnosis was that the handset was u/s and another handset we had was also u/s.

We bought another handset suite and plugged it in to the old telephone lead. It still didn't work so I put on the new lead in the box.....

BINGO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

ricardian
15th Mar 2018, 17:12
Telephone needs two wires, broadband only needs one wire

Lascaille
15th Mar 2018, 17:47
Telephone needs two wires, broadband only needs one wire

Both 'broadband' (DSL) and a normal phoneline need (share) one twisted pair...

Mr Mac
15th Mar 2018, 18:15
Redhillphil
We are currently having on going problems with the Yorkshire house broadband from BT. Unable to stream video, and this has been going on for 5 weeks. Engineers have checked lines, changed suppressers (we have MW radio mast nearby) and we have new Hub 6 and still nothing doing. A "specialist" engineer is coming Friday pm to hopefully sort out, but it has taken for ever compounded by the snow stopping a previous visit. Have had many calls with call centres in Calcutta, Gateshead, Hyderabad, Swansea, Glasgow, Bangalore to no avail. It will be interesting when we come to discuss the compensation, otherwise sounds like Virgin here we come !


Kind regards
Mr Mac

Saintsman
15th Mar 2018, 18:34
Most companies will try the 'out of warranty' trick. The fact is they must provide a product that is fit for purpose and that is backed up by the Sale of Goods which states that you have a legal right to repair, replacement, partial or full refund if a fault appear within 6 years (5 in Scotland) and it is reasonable for the goods to last that long.

There are some Ts & Cs along with it, but it is always worth fighting if things go wrong outside the 'warranty' period.

UniFoxOs
15th Mar 2018, 18:37
Many people seem to have spare routers about due to changing suppliers - I have been given 3 or 4 by friends for my "come in handy" box. If you can borrow one off a neighbour or workmate you can prove that yours was faulty, or not. If the borrowed one works you could probably extend the borrow for the price of a pint until your contract expires and you get a new one off BT (or whoever you choose to go with).

DG101
15th Mar 2018, 19:02
Have you tried changing the filter? A new one can be obtained cheap cheap cheap. But you probably have a spare one in the "come in useful" box - which reduces the cost to an infinitesimally small amount.

old,not bold
15th Mar 2018, 19:06
I have no sympathy. Anyone who deals with BT deserves all they get.

I cannot understand why so many people don't understand that BT is by a huge margin the worst and most expensive broadband and telephone service provider in the UK.

The disgraceful monopoly they have over almost all the wired/fibre-optic infrastructure through Open Reach makes things even worse.

Move from BT as your service provider and your life will change for the better. Well, OK, only if you don't move to TalkTalk.

B Fraser
15th Mar 2018, 19:22
If you don't like BT, go to PlusNet. I live out in the wilds and get almost 80Mb/s with BT Infinity which is rather impressive. I have just done a quick comparison on USwitch and BT are not the most expensive option by quite a margin.

Blues&twos
15th Mar 2018, 19:44
Unusual, we have not had any issues getting free replacement BT Homehubs when either the power supply or hub itself has failed. Maybe we've always been within the contract period when I've asked.

chevvron
15th Mar 2018, 19:54
If you don't like BT, go to PlusNet. I live out in the wilds and get almost 80Mb/s with BT Infinity which is rather impressive. I have just done a quick comparison on USwitch and BT are not the most expensive option by quite a margin.
Last October, I was getting about 2.5 download speed on Plusnet, and my phone didn't work at all during a wet spell. Called Plusnet on mobile; they said couldn't understand it and unable to give me faster broadband (it had been 5.5 a few weeks before)
So I changed back to BT; cost slightly more (not a lot) and broadband now 15.0.
Yes I KNOW they're the same company; don't keep on at me; you sound like my wife.

xraydice
15th Mar 2018, 20:04
During one of our frequent broadband outages , I called the fellow in India who after going through his routine and despite my protestations pronounced all was well with the BT line. There is I understand a technical term relating to the picture attached, the insides pretty much FUBAR , now have limited and intermittent service.

BirdmanBerry
15th Mar 2018, 20:36
If you don't like BT, go to PlusNet. I live out in the wilds and get almost 80Mb/s with BT Infinity which is rather impressive. I have just done a quick comparison on USwitch and BT are not the most expensive option by quite a margin.

Plusnet are BT....

RedhillPhil
15th Mar 2018, 21:19
Thankyou all for your thoughts and suggestions. I'm currently with B.T. as B.T. was the supplier when I bought the bungalow.

BirdmanBerry
15th Mar 2018, 21:24
Phil,

Can you log into the router and see if there is sync?

Smeagol
15th Mar 2018, 21:31
Phil

AS a BT customer who regularly gets a decrease in broadband speeds ( download sometimes down to less than 1.0 Mb/s. Don't even ask about the upload speeds:sad:) I have found that using the complaints procedure on their website (not particularly easy to find though) usually has the desired effect.
Recently complained and got a new router (Hub 5) to replace the Hub 3 that I was using. This was a free replacement and did increase speeds a bit up to around 3 Mb/s. But my house is at the end of a long copper wire and being in rural Norfolk there is little hope of fibre reaching us anytime this century:{:{:{

Pontius Navigator
15th Mar 2018, 21:31
I just moved home with TalkTalk. Cutting to the chase, my fibre speed was 50% of my guaranteed value. The BT Open reach mean found no problems between cabinet and my master socket but confirmed the slow speed.

As there was no fault he changed my lines. Then he discovered my copper distance had halved and my speed more than doubled.

Blackfriar
15th Mar 2018, 21:45
I had BT but costs kept climbing so I left and went to Plusnet, who I had used before. I also knew some of the people there as I used to sell to them before they were bought by BT. Service was horrible and Plusnet couldn't make it work properly, in fact after leaving Plusnet I deduced that the problem was that the BT Home Hub was miles better than the cheapo router provided by Plusnet. I went and bought a decent wireless router - £80 - and things are much better. The lesson is that the wireless bit is often the weakest link and free wifi routers are often only any good in one or two rooms.

ShyTorque
15th Mar 2018, 22:02
After dreadful service from Sky (especially their appalling technical support) I transferred back (!) to BT, which had previously been poor, simply so that Sky couldn't blame BT who supplied the line rental, and vice versa. Since then the reliability and speed of my broadband have been really very good, probably because they brought fibre to the village following multiple complaints from more recent householders of a new housing estate, which went as far as our local MP. I often actually get a slightly quicker download rate than advertised.

wowzz
15th Mar 2018, 23:47
Hate to be smug, but my broadband speed here in deepest Lincs is 55 mbps. The BT engineer who installed the connection could not believe it ! The speed is around 3 times faster than in the new developments in Lincoln.

Gertrude the Wombat
15th Mar 2018, 23:59
Switch to Virgin. The cable modems last for years, but when they die they're replaced without charge (I'm on I think my third, but I'm not sure whether that's counting the one that got destroyed in a lightning strike).

B Fraser
16th Mar 2018, 08:33
Plusnet are BT....

They are owned by BT but are a separate company who in turn are a customer of Openreach. They are not favoured in any way.


There's always EE 4G as an alternative. I use them in the garden office instead of running a cable from the house. Their network has the best coverage and performance in the UK.

Pontius Navigator
16th Mar 2018, 08:38
GTW, it is a balance of affordability and performance.

I use TalkTalk and rated the 24/7 inclusive charges at a low cost as the most important with a reliable broadband second. Mind you, when our phone and BB were off for 3 hours while it was being repaired I am not so sure :)

Pontius Navigator
16th Mar 2018, 08:44
On range extension I used the Devolo plugs. Worked well but pug ugly.
They also tended to fail: one dropped out of the network. The link speed also halves.

Got a small Netgear plug in wireless booster. Fraction of the cost and much neater. Although my DSL router provided by TalkTalk has a strong signal bought a second for far end of house, easy set up too. Only a small speed hit.

scr1
16th Mar 2018, 08:47
There's always EE 4G as an alternative

Who are also owned by BT

UniFoxOs
16th Mar 2018, 08:53
There's always EE 4G as an alternative. I use them in the garden office instead of running a cable from the house. Their network has the best coverage and performance in the UK.

And who can't even provide reliable 2G here in the centre of the country, let alone 3G or 4G. I'm sticking with copper.

RedhillPhil
16th Mar 2018, 10:32
Phil,

Can you log into the router and see if there is sync?. If you can tell me how and what to do I'll give it a go.:)

B Fraser
16th Mar 2018, 10:43
Who are also owned by BT



02 are owned by Telefonica, 3 are owned by Hutchison Whampoa.


EE have the best network as described here......


Best UK Mobile Network 2018: The best phone networks in January 2018 (http://www.trustedreviews.com/news/best-uk-mobile-network-2018-3379142)

chevvron
16th Mar 2018, 11:39
Switch to Virgin. The cable modems last for years, but when they die they're replaced without charge (I'm on I think my third, but I'm not sure whether that's counting the one that got destroyed in a lightning strike).

You can't switch to Virgin around here unless you pay to have a new fibre cable laid from the cabinet to the house which would mean digging a trench in my tarmac drive.
Openreach are useless. I was with Plusnet and wanted a new socket installed which had to be connected outside. They made an appointment for Openreach to visit. I sat in almost all day waiting for them before phoning to find out what was happening.
'Oh the engineer called but there was no reply' they said.
Bloody liars; I was sitting next to the front door all the time (they wouldn't have been able to access any other door from the street) looking out of the window most of the time and never saw or heard anything.
I found a independent engineer in Yellow Pages who arrived right on time; told him that I'd originally had an appointment with Openreach; 'don't tell me' he said' they didn't turn up but claimed they had'.
He then went on 'they do that all the time; I used to work for them but got so fed up with their attitude I set up on my own'.

Pontius Navigator
16th Mar 2018, 11:59
Redhillphil, log in to your router. Enter 192.168.1.1 in your browser.

Your user name is probably Admin. Your router password, not your WiFi password, is probably on the back of the router or router card.

Have a look at all the settings but don't change any!

Sallyann1234
16th Mar 2018, 12:01
You can't switch to Virgin around here unless you pay to have a new fibre cable laid from the cabinet to the house which would mean digging a trench in my tarmac drive.
It would have been coaxial cable from the cabinet, not fibre. They would have laid the cable on the surface in flexible trunking, without charge. But of course that would quite rightly have been unacceptable to you.

G-CPTN
16th Mar 2018, 12:45
It would have been coaxial cable from the cabinet, not fibre.

My 'cabinet' is at the exchange.
I am not a high-demand user (no desire to stream video other than YouTube), so no desire to pay extra for 'Superfast' when the benefit would be limited and unnecessary.

RedhillPhil
16th Mar 2018, 13:28
Redhillphil, log in to your router. Enter 192.168.1.1 in your browser.

Your user name is probably Admin. Your router password, not your WiFi password, is probably on the back of the router or router card.

Have a look at all the settings but don't change any!


Erm, that seems like I have to go on line. I cannot get on line.........I'm not very good when it comes to computers so please excuse me if I'm missing something here.:confused:

exeng
16th Mar 2018, 13:55
Erm, that seems like I have to go on line. I cannot get on line.

To access the router you do not actually have to be 'on-line' as such.

Using the address 192.168.1.1 takes you directly to the router admin pages - it is in effect a direct link between your computer and the router - it is using a 'browser page' but it is communication between your computer and the router directly.

Best to hardwire from your computer to the router using an ethernet cable.

I'm certainly no expert in these matters but I hope this helps.


Kind regards
Exeng

old,not bold
16th Mar 2018, 13:58
I have used Utility Warehouse for years; I'm sure others are equally good, maybe cheaper from time to time. But the main reason is that if something goes wrong, the support phone is picked up quickly, by someone who is not only in the UK and speaks perfect English, usually as their native tongue, but has a considerable amount of technical expertise and thus understands what the problem is and deals with it.

BT, on the other hand....................

(OK, my last contact was a few years ago when I discovered to my horror that they had been conning my very aged mother out of £80 per month for several years for a simple landline connection. She thought she could trust them and that this was the cheapest option. I had to do the usual 2-hour tour of Indian call-centres as each one denied any responsibility and connected me to the next, but only after having to once again explain the problem slowly in 1-syllable words. A written threat of publicity in the form of a draft press release, combined with legal action (case filed in the County Court) for recovery of about £3,000 brought the matter to a swift conclusion. I gather from BT victims I see occasionally that things have not improved.)

Fareastdriver
16th Mar 2018, 16:26
Should you be in a room that is some distance from the modem get a pair of powerline connectors. The ones where you can plug them in and then plug in another plug on top are the best. I'm only ten yards from the modem where a two foot granite wall slows it down but the powerline bypasses that.

RedhillPhil
16th Mar 2018, 16:42
To access the router you do not actually have to be 'on-line' as such.

Using the address 192.168.1.1 takes you directly to the router admin pages - it is in effect a direct link between your computer and the router - it is using a 'browser page' but it is communication between your computer and the router directly.

Best to hardwire from your computer to the router using an ethernet cable.

I'm certainly no expert in these matters but I hope this helps.


Kind regards
Exeng. OK, Thanks, I''ll give it a go.

RedhillPhil
16th Mar 2018, 17:50
To access the router you do not actually have to be 'on-line' as such.

Using the address 192.168.1.1 takes you directly to the router admin pages - it is in effect a direct link between your computer and the router - it is using a 'browser page' but it is communication between your computer and the router directly.

Best to hardwire from your computer to the router using an ethernet cable.

I'm certainly no expert in these matters but I hope this helps.


Kind regards
Exeng. Nope, nothing. Replacement router thingy on the way from a nice man in a computer shop.

gemma10
16th Mar 2018, 18:42
I dumped EE for Plusnet quite simply because their monthly price went up out of all proportion for a anytime phone service and fibre to the cabinet. Plusnet router is very poor, I have to keep unplugging it and rebooting to get anywhere near the 17-20 Mb I was promised. Iam considering buying a router-any suggestions? Also my phone no longer gives caller display with Plusnet. I guess the £10/month I am saving was not worth the switch.

chevvron
16th Mar 2018, 20:31
It would have been coaxial cable from the cabinet, not fibre. They would have laid the cable on the surface in flexible trunking, without charge. But of course that would quite rightly have been unacceptable to you.

The nearest above ground cabinet is about a mile away so the cable would have to run along roads and across ditches and grass verges before it even reached my drive.

chevvron
16th Mar 2018, 20:36
My 'cabinet' is at the exchange.
I am not a high-demand user (no desire to stream video other than YouTube), so no desire to pay extra for 'Superfast' when the benefit would be limited and unnecessary.

I don't stream video very much (only when I've missed a particular TV programme which is rarely) so I haven't even bothered to get FTTC, the 15 mbps I get using copper is adequate for my needs.

Gertrude the Wombat
16th Mar 2018, 20:55
Please be aware that there are a sequence of boxes between your computer and the incoming wire or fibre.

First is the modem - the thing that translates the analogue signals on the wire into the digital signals your computer needs.

Then, optionally, comes the router. This allows the signal to be distributed around multiple computers, and usually contains various bits of network infrastructure such as NAT and DHCP.

Then, optionally, comes whatever you want to actually distribute the connections, being a switch (or hub) for wired connections, and/or a wireless access point (I have both).

You can, if you wish, get them all in one box, which might be called a "broadband router" or somesuch, but you might alternatively have each function in a separate box. (In my case the modem is on its own, downstairs, then upstairs I've got the router and wireless access point combined in one box, and the switch in another.)

So you need to be careful that you know what you need - if you ask for a router when you need a modem you might get a router when you need a modem.

under_exposed
17th Mar 2018, 13:01
Gertrude, the router joins two networks together (your service providers and your home network in this case).
The hub or switch joins the computers together, or other devices. A hub just sends what comes in on one port out on all ports. A switch learns which port data needs to be sent out on.

Pontius Navigator
17th Mar 2018, 16:02
GTW, the $64k question. If my router shows a link rate of 49.9Mbps and the wifi link shows 32Mbps, is there a way to minimise that loss?

Incidentally, before my connection was improved by Openreach is was getting 21.545Mpbs and 16-20Mbps over the wifi, is a very small loss.

Gertrude the Wombat
17th Mar 2018, 16:16
Gertrude, the router joins two networks together (your service providers and your home network in this case).
The hub or switch joins the computers together, or other devices. A hub just sends what comes in on one port out on all ports. A switch learns which port data needs to be sent out on.
Yes, I know all that, and it doesn't conflict with anything I've said. You still need, in addition, a modem, to convert between the signal and protocols on the WAN wire and what you're using in the house.

Gertrude the Wombat
17th Mar 2018, 16:19
GTW, the $64k question. If my router shows a link rate of 49.9Mbps and the wifi link shows 32Mbps, is there a way to minimise that loss?
No idea. I was under the impression that Wi-Fi links could go rather higher than that, so it'll depend on the capabilities of your access point, the capabilities of your receiving machine, and the propagation between the two (the link won't go faster than both ends have the hardware and software for, and won't go faster than the bits can be shoved across the air). And radio propagation isn't really science, it's well within the realms of magic.

How many stolen porno movies do you want to watch at once anyway? - or do you have some other use for such high bandwidth?

Sallyann1234
17th Mar 2018, 16:29
GTW, the $64k question. If my router shows a link rate of 49.9Mbps and the wifi link shows 32Mbps, is there a way to minimise that loss?

Incidentally, before my connection was improved by Openreach is was getting 21.545Mpbs and 16-20Mbps over the wifi, is a very small loss.

There is always a speed loss with WiFi due to signalling and error correction overheads. You might get a little more by moving your device nearer the router, but in that case you might just as well connect with a cable. :sad:

But I doubt that you will actually notice much difference in practice.

Pontius Navigator
17th Mar 2018, 16:55
Sallyann, open to suggestions on how to connect a Kindle to a router :)

GTW, in a new build one room has two TV points and a Sat terminal but at the south end of the room. We prefer the TV at the north end and don't want to run a TV aerial over 10m or so. Our work around is very successful. An Amazon Fire Stick powered through the USB Ports gives us just one cable to the TV and works very well. 35Mbps works OK, I am just a speed freak and of course would like to get as close to what I am paying for as possible :)

Sallyann1234
17th Mar 2018, 17:03
Sallyann, open to suggestions on how to connect a Kindle to a router :)
Why do you need high speed for a Kindle? Mine can download books perfectly well on a public WiFi at 2Mb/s

jimtherev
17th Mar 2018, 18:47
GTW, the $64k question. If my router shows a link rate of 49.9Mbps and the wifi link shows 32Mbps, is there a way to minimise that loss?

Incidentally, before my connection was improved by Openreach is was getting 21.545Mpbs and 16-20Mbps over the wifi, is a very small loss.
It's also worthwhile downloading a wifi analyser & looking what's happening. Just about everyone round here (on a/b/n, anyway) is on channel 1, and that is what my router defaulted to. Now I've changed it to 7- ish, I'm away from all the clutter and speed doubled. On 5 Ghz and channel 36 there's no interference at all... but not all kit can manage that yet.

radeng
18th Mar 2018, 13:41
I have an interesting problem. Bear in mind that there is 7km of wire between me and the sub-exchange, so speed is low. On March 8, the broadband and telephopne failed - suddenly. Restored 'phone at 1430 March 13, but broadband refused to come back until 2240. Technician reported the problem as a blown fuse in the sub-exchange.

Since then, the broadband (only) goes down every day, usually in the early evening, for a short period - e.g. March 14 1810 to 1830, March 15 1830 to 1855, March 16 1940 to 2015, March 17 2030 to 2115. The Hub 5 shows no broadband connection during these periods....

Openreach are puzzled, and have a task down to change the card in the sub-exchange. Seems a peculiar type of fault to me......Anybody got any suggestions, other than someone playing silly b's in the sub-exchange?

Still, with the faults I have had so far this year, whether on the telephone or the broadband (or both), the system has been down 20% of the time. From Jan 30 to February 10, the telephone wasn't working - but the broadband was. According to BT, it was a line fault necessitating digging up the road. Now in the same multipair cable running from the sub-exchange are something like 60 or more pairs of wires, including a pair for the phone line of Mrs Radeng - which carried on working........and for the old people's home further along the lane past me, as well as the 5 pairs for the farmers, none of whom lost service.

The automatic fault location using TDR (Time Domain Reflectometry) isn't very good, either. When we first moved here, we had overhead line to the sub-exchange. A fault which the 'tests' said was 'in the house' was actually up a pole two miles away!

Sallyann1234
18th Mar 2018, 16:39
Only speculation of course, but the exchange will have LLU equipment from other service providers. The BT/Openreach guy you spoke to might not know what the other ISP staff are doing there when installing their own gear and switching lines.

G-CPTN
18th Mar 2018, 17:12
the exchange will have LLU equipment from other service providers. what the other ISP staff are doing there when installing their own gear and switching lines.

I know that LLU allows other ISPs to access BT's lines, but I am surprised if the Virgin/TalkTalk/Whatever staff gain physical access to the exchange equipment.

Right Way Up
18th Mar 2018, 17:24
BT - worst company I have ever dealt with. They always blame a fault within your property. At least three times a year had to deal with an issue with the service for over a week. In the end I had a script to read to them before they talked so we could get straight to the problem rather than waste my time with troubleshooting.

In the end I changed to Sky and for a year have had continuous and good service. The only time they had an outage I received a text before I even knew the broadband was down and they kept me regularly updated.

BT are not fit for purpose.

Pontius Navigator
18th Mar 2018, 17:31
Why do you need high speed for a Kindle? Mine can download books perfectly well on a public WiFi at 2Mb/s

Kindle Fire or Android phone.

Pontius Navigator
18th Mar 2018, 17:36
Jim, ahead of you there. I am on Ch 9 and only my neighbour on Sky, and much weaker signal on Ch 11. BT are at 1/6.

Sallyann1234
18th Mar 2018, 19:10
I know that LLU allows other ISPs to access BT's lines, but I am surprised if the Virgin/TalkTalk/Whatever staff gain physical access to the exchange equipment.
How do you think they install their own equipment?

Pontius Navigator
18th Mar 2018, 19:14
How do you think they install their own equipment?
Exactly the same way the fixed my problem of speed. Everyone contracts out these days.

G-CPTN
18th Mar 2018, 19:15
How do you think they install their own equipment?

But there are thousands of exchanges - some in remote locations.

Bob Viking
18th Mar 2018, 19:18
I can only second the comments suggesting they are utterly unfit for purpose.

I have now been waiting 3 months for them to complete the installation of our fibre broadband. How hard can it be?!

Up until now I have been paying for the ‘up to 10MBPS’ package (we live in a rural area). Through no fault of my own, I am obviously a long way from the exchange, this means I get about 4 MBPS. So why do I pay the same as someone who gets the full 10 MBPS?

More importantly why in this day and age have I had to live with 4 MBPs for this bloody long?!

Grrrrrrr...

BV

Sallyann1234
18th Mar 2018, 19:18
I'd be interested to hear whether radeng has the same problem this evening.
If it's been finger trouble by someone working in the exchange, they will probably have had a day off on Sunday.

radeng
18th Mar 2018, 19:31
I would have been a bit surprised for anyone to have been working in a village sub-exchange doing anything at 2030 on a Saturday night with heavy snow falling and warnings only to travel for dire necessity.......Plus there is currently a shortage of technicians for this area because of sickness: the guy who came and changed the fuses came from the other side of Bristol.

But Sallyann could be correct.....

I'm pretty well at the edge of the area covered by Malmesbury and its subs: ironically, across the field a quarter of a mile away I can see some houses that are on the Purton sub-exchange (that's a sub of Swindon) and they get over 5Mbps whereas I am lucky to get 1.5! On the other hand, that also limits the interference to HF radio from ADSL....

Pontius Navigator
18th Mar 2018, 21:27
I can only second the comments suggesting they are utterly unfit for purpose.

I have now been waiting 3 months for them to complete the installation of our fibre broadband. How hard can it be?!

Up until now I have been paying for the ‘up to 10MBPS’ package (we live in a rural area). Through no fault of my own, I am obviously a long way from the exchange, this means I get about 4 MBPS. So why do I pay the same as someone who gets the full 10 MBPS?

More importantly why in this day and age have I had to live with 4 MBPs for this bloody long?!

Grrrrrrr...

BV

Do you have a guaranteed minimum speed?

BirdmanBerry
18th Mar 2018, 21:44
On wireless, always try and use channels 1, 6 or 11 in the UK. This gives enough spacing to prevent interference, but bear in mind microwave overs and DECT phones will cause this also.

If you have any american kit, don't use channel 13 on your wifi as their kit won't see it.

Sallyann1234
18th Mar 2018, 21:50
On wireless, always try and use channels 1, 6 or 11 in the UK. This gives enough spacing to prevent interference, but bear in mind microwave overs and DECT phones will cause this also.
DECT phones do not interfere with WiFi. There is a separate EU frequency band for DECT.

Pontius Navigator
19th Mar 2018, 09:12
Less than 10, ouch. After pressing TalkTalk we jumped ahead on the LLU programme and our village noticeboard had a plaque "This is a TalkTalk village". I used to get around 18-20 on a 38 connection.

Now, in a sleepy little rural hamlet I get 50. Must admit we are just out of earshot of the A1.

Have you done an availability check? BT, amongst others, have a tool that will say what is available on your post code and what minimum service you can expect.

One reason for me wanting more speed is when I update my satnav mapping with a download of over 2Gb.

radeng
19th Mar 2018, 11:37
Good job Mrs radeng has a separate internet connection.

Sallyann, the broadband went down at 2330 Sunday night, and is still down. Technician (they call them engineers, but I doubt if they are members of a professional institution) visit confirmed for Thursday pm.

At 0950, Mrs radeng's line went down: the hub showed a blue light and even when reset did so. But one could not access any internet page....called BT and they ran tests and at 1025, without doing anything, all of a sudden web pages could be accessed!

It's a pity that once it's all working, it isn't in a locked cabinet that nobody can bu***r about with it!

Sallyann1234
19th Mar 2018, 12:11
Good job Mrs radeng has a separate internet connection.

Sallyann, the broadband went down at 2330 Sunday night, and is still down. Technician (they call them engineers, but I doubt if they are members of a professional institution) visit confirmed for Thursday pm.

At 0950, Mrs radeng's line went down: the hub showed a blue light and even when reset did so. But one could not access any internet page....called BT and they ran tests and at 1025, without doing anything, all of a sudden web pages could be accessed!

It's a pity that once it's all working, it isn't in a locked cabinet that nobody can bu***r about with it!

Even when the modem is synched with the DSLAM, there will be no internet service if the pipe is broken further upstream, so the 'blue light' by itself is no guarantee of service.

I suppose if you live in a remote location to get away from urban ambient RF levels, you will also be far from the other 'benefits' of civilisation like fast internet. :*

radeng
19th Mar 2018, 20:02
I suppose if you live in a remote location to get away from urban ambient RF levels, you will also be far from the other 'benefits' of civilisation like fast internet.

True. Except that when it is working, it is quite fast enough for me for most of the time, so hardly a 'benefit'!

The downside of living out here are the night time noises of owls hunting and foxes mating - which sounds like a multiple rape murder is in progress, plus the Muncjack deer having a go at the plum tree. But seeing the Great Tits, Treecreepers, Chaffinches, Blackbirds, Robins, Wrens, Mistle Thrushes etc on occasion and even Jays sort of makes up for it.

Gertrude the Wombat
19th Mar 2018, 20:28
I suppose if you live in a remote location to get away from urban ambient RF levels
I worked for a radio tech company for a while. Their office was in the middle of nowhere, the location having been chosen by driving around looking for low RF.

The internet service was crap. As were the power cuts.

radeng
19th Mar 2018, 20:35
We chose to get somewhere out in the wilds to minimise problems of radio noise and RFI. Plus the ability to get planning permission for a tower and HF beam antennas at 60 feet and another for VHF antennas at 40 feet. It was North Wilts District Council then, and the officials were very helpful - it may have helped that one of their senior staff at the time was a radio amateur!