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troppo
14th Mar 2018, 13:27
Is there anything good about iPhone/IOS?
Android is logical.
You ever tried getting a sim card out of an iPhone with a toothpick after a couple of beers/rums? :mad:
After Eve's performance in the garden of eden I can draw some similarities...

Nige321
14th Mar 2018, 13:52
Just press the provided tool (Or a paper clip) into the provided hole. How hard can it be...??

fleigle
14th Mar 2018, 14:15
Well Troppo, just go and invent something perfect......

Espada III
14th Mar 2018, 14:17
Even Androids have gone that way also; its saves space. Horrible idea though. Sony use a different system that is superior as you don't need the paperclip.

Dont Hang Up
14th Mar 2018, 14:23
Is there anything good about iPhone/IOS?
Android is logical.
You ever tried getting a sim card out of an iPhone with a toothpick after a couple of beers/rums?
After Eve's performance in the garden of eden I can draw some similarities...
Not sure how the operating system relates to the ease of getting at the sim card :bored:

However I see that Samsung, king of the Android phone market, is sadly now following Apple down the route of sealed unit (cannot replace the battery) and fiddly pop-out sim holder.

Thomas coupling
14th Mar 2018, 14:37
Does it matter - all fones will be replaced within 5 years with AR. Google and MS already getting them ready for market.

Sallyann1234
14th Mar 2018, 14:52
Embedded SIM cards have been talked about for a loooong time now:

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/07/16/apple_samsung_sim_talks/

Highway1
14th Mar 2018, 15:07
The US CDMA cellphone system doesnt use sim cards - they are a feature of GSM only.

Sallyann1234
14th Mar 2018, 15:33
The US CDMA cellphone system doesnt use sim cards - they are a feature of GSM only.
Err no.

SIM cards were introduced with GSM, but have continued with all the subsequent developments up to and including 4G/LTE, and are now pretty well universal outside the US.

And even in the US where CDMA was/is common, SIM cards are now being introduced by e.g. Verizon so that users can access LTE networks in the US and when travelling abroad.

Dont Hang Up
14th Mar 2018, 15:46
I have no problem with them "virtualising" the SIM card provided there is no loss of the flexibility that physical SIM cards provide. For example the ability to pop in a cheap local SIM when on holiday.

I've just had to cut a mini SIM down to nano size to fit my new phone. Considering the sophistication of mobile phone technology in general, it seemed like a stone-age procedure in comparison!

So, so long as none of that flexibility is lost, I will happily do without the fiddly little things.

Sallyann1234
14th Mar 2018, 15:55
I have no problem with them "virtualising" the SIM card provided there is no loss of the flexibility that physical SIM cards provide. For example the ability to pop in a cheap local SIM when on holiday.

I've just had to cut a mini SIM down to nano size to fit my new phone. Considering the sophistication of mobile phone technology in general, it seemed like a stone-age procedure in comparison!

So, so long as none of that flexibility is lost, I will happily do without the fiddly little things.
There is the problem. Whatever form the internal SIM takes, it has to be virtually replaced when required. That requires remote access, which brings with it an inherent security risk.

There is still a lot to be said for that little bit of hardware

Jhieminga
14th Mar 2018, 16:26
I don't know if Android has followed suit by now, but for a long time iPhones were the only handsets where you could pop out the SIM card without having to power down the phone, and the software wouldn't throw a fit. I always saw that as a sign of some pretty robust programming inside.

ExXB
14th Mar 2018, 18:15
It may be a pain finding a paper clip, but the phones are waterproof. I like my apple stuff, it all just works - together.

Sallyann1234
15th Mar 2018, 10:46
Samsung phones are just the same now - a paper clip (if you have lost the provided tool) opens up the SIM slot.
As a bonus, it also allows you to insert a memory card to expand the internal memory - something not available on an iPhone where you have to pay a heavy premium for extra internal memory.
It's also worth mentioning that some android models can accept two SIM cards so that the frequent traveller can be connected to two networks at local rates.

Ogre
15th Mar 2018, 11:41
Slight thread drift, but does anyone know what the "i" in iPhone, iPod, iPad stand for?

Bull at a Gate
15th Mar 2018, 11:49
iDonít!

(Extra characters needed)

RedhillPhil
15th Mar 2018, 12:04
Intelligent ?
Information ?
It'll go wrong ?

WilliumMate
15th Mar 2018, 12:13
The daughter was given the new iphone for her wedding anniversary present and passed her old (?) iphone 7+ to her Dad, I ain't complaining as I get a new dog every year or so. It's taking a hell of a time getting used to the Apple offering though after having Samsung android phones for years but I shall persevere. Not got past the 'what's this button for' stage yet.

:ouch:

Dan Dare
15th Mar 2018, 12:18
does anyone know what the "i" in iPhone, iPod, iPad stand for?

Merely fashion. Once everything was "EZ", then "MS", then "e-", then ".com", then "i" (not just Apple, but many companies), then "2000", then "cloud". I've probably missed a few steps out too. I know what the next fashion will be, but I'm not telling in case I can make a bomb out of it (in the old-fashioned money sense, not the modern, new-fangled terrorist fashion).

G0ULI
15th Mar 2018, 12:41
The Apple iPhone was the original from which all modern phone designs have evolved or copied. The "i" stands for internet as the devices were designed to be capable of being updated or connected to the internet for downloading apps and content.

Samsung make the best rival to the iPhone, but all their models have one major flaw, they are not Apple iPhones!

ORAC
15th Mar 2018, 14:24
Why the "i" in iPhone? - iPhone J.D. (http://www.iphonejd.com/iphone_jd/2009/01/the-i-in-iphone.html)

Highway1
15th Mar 2018, 15:33
Err no.

SIM cards were introduced with GSM, but have continued with all the subsequent developments up to and including 4G/LTE, and are now pretty well universal outside the US.

And even in the US where CDMA was/is common, SIM cards are now being introduced by e.g. Verizon so that users can access LTE networks in the US and when travelling abroad.

Err yes.
Stop being so pedantic - CDMA doesn't use sim cards. If you also want to access another network you need a sim but for CDMA you dont - which is precisely what I said. :ugh:

MG23
15th Mar 2018, 18:05
Is there anything good about iPhone/IOS?

1. Apple actually support their products, rather than shipping them and then abandoning them.

2. Even when Android manufacturers do release firmware updates, they have to go through the phone carrier, so you never know if or when you'll get them.

3. They're not made by an advertising company, so they have no incentive to spy on everything you do.

As for SIM cards, my old Android phone required taking the battery out to reach it.

UniFoxOs
15th Mar 2018, 18:44
but all their models have one major flaw, they are not Apple iPhones!

That's a benefit, not a flaw.

so they have no incentive to spy on everything you do.

You may believe that.

MG23
15th Mar 2018, 19:06
You may believe that.

We know Google spy on just about everything you do to sell ads, and took years even to provide options to disable the vast numbers of permissions that the average app demands when installed.

Where's your evidence that Apple are doing anything even remotely similar?

GGR155
15th Mar 2018, 19:18
We had a speaker at our managers conference who spoke about his involvement with Apple and Mr Jobs. He designed the i and I believe part owns the patent.
He spoke of a torrid time working with the late Steve Jobs who was prone to enormous mood swings and tantrums. All in all a very interesting 45 minutes listening.
He is also credited with several other corporate strap lines such as 'The Ultimate Driving Machine' associated with BMW.

Sallyann1234
15th Mar 2018, 20:36
2. Even when Android manufacturers do release firmware updates, they have to go through the phone carrier, so you never know if or when you'll get them.
Only if you have a carrier locked phone.