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james ozzie
4th Mar 2018, 20:48
Passing of a fine man. From Wiki:

Bannister went on to become a distinguished neurologist and Master of Pembroke College, Oxford, before retiring in 1993. When asked whether the 4-minute mile was his proudest achievement, he said he felt prouder of his contribution to academic medicine through research into the responses of the nervous system. Bannister was patron of the MSA Trust. He was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease in 2011.[2]

treadigraph
4th Mar 2018, 20:59
A fine man indeed...

Uncle Fred
4th Mar 2018, 21:36
One of my heroes. We have lost a fine man.

Lonewolf_50
4th Mar 2018, 21:38
Well done, and a life well lived.
When asked whether the 4-minute mile was his proudest achievement, he said he felt prouder of his contribution to academic medicine through research into the responses of the nervous system. *tips cap*

Hydromet
4th Mar 2018, 21:51
As a child I enjoyed the rivalry between Bannister & Landy, although I always barracked for Landy, of course.

In later years, both had illustrious careers and were always gentlemen.

Well done, sir.

racedo
4th Mar 2018, 23:10
I doubt he was the first 4 minute mile, think that was likely achieved centuries before when someone running from a big animal intent on eating them or someone seeking to kill them.

He was the 1st recorded 4 minute mile and what I liked about him was he never saw it as a reason to use it to live the life of a celebrity, rather he went back to what he loved doing.

Hats off to a gent.

Thomas coupling
5th Mar 2018, 12:34
How times have changed in sport:

Bannister had just come off a previous shift in the hospital to do this race.
His training consisted of 30-45 minutes per day (too busy during the weekend) for a couple of months before the race.

A fantastic achievement, he put Britain well and trully on the sporting map.

Fitter2
5th Mar 2018, 12:46
P.s. Request some help for the video about his run a famous bbc commentator describing the moment as announcing of time and how many records he has broken.

According to an interview done on the 50th anniversary of the record, and replayed on R4 this morning, said commentator was one Norris McWhirter (Guinness Book of Records chap)

McWhirter came to public attention while working for the BBC as a sports commentator. On 6 May 1954, he kept the time when Roger Bannister ran the first sub four-minute mile.[4] After the race, he began his announcement:

As a result of Event Four, the one mile, the winner was R. G. Bannister of Exeter and Merton colleges, in a time which, subject to ratification, is a track record, an English native record, a United Kingdom record, a European record, in a time of three minutes...

at which the rest of McWhirter's announcement was drowned out in the enthusiastic uproar. (Courtesy of Wiki...)

teeteringhead
5th Mar 2018, 13:11
He was the 1st recorded 4 minute mile [PEDANT MODE] Of course it was the first SUB 4 minute mile [/PEDANT MODE]

ISTR the first (exactly) 4 minute mile was later, and was (?) Derek Ibbotson. Always a good pub quiz question that!!

Wingswinger
5th Mar 2018, 18:24
I have fond memories of being transfixed to our TV as a three-year-old watching that famous mile several times. Bumped into him (not literally) in Oxford once several years ago - A gentleman and a scholar. There are few like him these days. A life well-lived.

NRU74
5th Mar 2018, 19:11
One must wonder, Teeters, the identity and future of the Oxford athletes in the race

The guy who came third, and who received little or no credit, was a miner from Tibshelf in Derbyshire, called Tom Hulatt. He made his own way to the AAA events, often sleeping on Railway Stations etc, no funding and apparently after the race went home with his brother to Derbyshire.

Barksdale Boy
6th Mar 2018, 02:31
The two main pace setters were Christopher Brasher - a founder of the London Marathon; and Christopher Chataway - a future Conservative MP. The latter's epic victory against Vladimir Kucs over 5,000 metres at the White City later in 1954 lives long in the memory - he broke the world record by about five seconds.

Jetex_Jim
6th Mar 2018, 07:51
The guy who came third, and who received little or no credit, was a miner from Tibshelf in Derbyshire, called Tom Hulatt. He made his own way to the AAA events, often sleeping on Railway Stations etc, no funding and apparently after the race went home with his brother to Derbyshire.
I thought he might be a real life prototype for Alf Tupper, the Tough of the Track in the Victor https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alf_Tupper. But it turns out that Alf precedes Tom Hulatt. Alf Tupper is a British comic strip, created by Bill Blaine (probably a pseudonym for William Blaine, head of DC Thomson comics), written by Gilbert Lawford Dalton (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilbert_Lawford_Dalton). It stars a working class, "hard as nails" runner, whose adventures appeared in The Rover (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Rover_(comics)) from 1949 and then The Victor (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Victor_(comics)), British boys' comics (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comics) from D. C. Thomson & Co. Ltd (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D._C._Thomson_%26_Co._Ltd). His adventures appeared over almost a 40-year period, until 1992, under the title The Tough of the Track. Many artists have written and drawn his stories, including Pete Sutherland, during his run in The Victor.
...Alf's last published appearance came in the Scottish newspaper, The Sunday Post (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sunday_Post) in 1992 and featured Alf in training for the Barcelona Olympic games (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barcelona_Olympic_games).

Tankertrashnav
6th Mar 2018, 11:25
The BBC dug a great item out of the archives that I had never heard before. Harold Abrahams recorded a "live" commentary on the race - actually done after the event as there was no radio commentary of the actual event. Played on Radio 4 yesterday.

Seem to remember Alf Tupper trained on fish and ships - no dieticians around in those days!

Planemike
6th Mar 2018, 11:32
The guy who came third, and who received little or no credit, was a miner from Tibshelf in Derbyshire, called Tom Hulatt. He made his own way to the AAA events, often sleeping on Railway Stations etc, no funding and apparently after the race went home with his brother to Derbyshire.

They built them tough in those days.......!!! No use of drugs more normally used to treat asthma .....!!!

teeteringhead
6th Mar 2018, 12:23
Cyfaill da bore da JENKINS

Pub quiz, Derek Ibbotson and RAF Netheravon?

I know Ibbo did his National Service in the RAF, was that at Netheravon? I believe it was while serving he began serious running.

Alternatively, there is a Dave Ibbotson (a son perhaps?) on the Council of the British Parachute Association; could this be the Netheravon connection?

NB: Never take me on in a Quiz!!