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anchorhold
27th Feb 2018, 13:57
It has recently been a debate on assumed consent regard the donations of organs, with the option of opting out. This is the current situation in Wales is assumed consent.

The interesting thing is that my understanding is in law upon death the body belongs to the state, so you could argue that the deceased belongs to the state.

While I think assumed consent is the way forward, I still wonder if the family could object to donation. The other problem is problem of people opting out for a variety of reasons. According to the NHS website, the official standpoint of the major faith groups is that organ donation is acceptable, my difficulty is that there may be some people who still want to opt out.

So if I was to donate my organs I would prefere to donate to someone who had not opted out of the organ register. In saying that surely the waiting list should give priority to those who have not opted out, that might sharpen a few minds!

I would be interested what the situation is in other countries.

charliegolf
27th Feb 2018, 14:13
In Wales, the relatives can, and too often do, refuse to have the organs harvested, and their wishes are always upheld (maybe simply to avoid the bad press?). To me that significantly undermines the law change and its intent. I'd make the law explicit- no optout from the donor, no veto by the family. I'm not bothered about it upsetting anyone.

CG

ShyTorque
27th Feb 2018, 14:22
I'd make the law explicit- no optout from the donor, no veto by the family. I'm not bothered about it upsetting anyone.
CG

Let's just hope that they allow the present owner to die first...

To save any future argument, I shall continue in my quest to completely wear out all my best bits before the state gets to exercise its option.

Super VC-10
27th Feb 2018, 16:58
I'll be opting out. Nobody wants me while I'm alive, so I'll not allow them to want me when I'm dead. My body parts are part of my estate. I should be allowed to sell them if I so desire.

11277m
27th Feb 2018, 17:12
My body parts are part of my estate. I should be allowed to sell them if I so desire.

Perhaps you could sell them in advance with collection "at the appropriate time"

ethicalconundrum
27th Feb 2018, 17:44
"Get the crash cart! Charge paddles to 250! Everyone CLEAR!"

"NO Doctor! Wait says here 'organ donor'."

"OK, hold up. We've got a donor. I'm going to call it. TOD - 15:58, lets get him into the OR and get busy, lot of stuff we can save here."

lolz.....

ShyTorque
27th Feb 2018, 18:20
CG, a new vocation in life for your consideration...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lDnS4pkmzis

Edit: Was it Jeremy Corbyn going on the cart?

4mastacker
27th Feb 2018, 18:26
Next thing you know is the government will be nicking your money after you've croaked it.........er, hang on....... they do. That's the taxman's job isn't it?

Fareastdriver
27th Feb 2018, 19:37
I live in Scotland so my organs are banned.

MG23
27th Feb 2018, 21:29
Considering we'll be 3D-printing replacement organs in a few years (using the recipient's stem cells, so no need to worry about rejection), this seems to matter about as much as figuring out how many angels can dance on the head of a pin.

krismiler
27th Feb 2018, 21:35
In Singapore there is assumed consent but you may opt out if you wish. If you do opt out you are at the back of the waiting list behind everyone who didn’t opt out if you ever need a transplant.

Seems fair and reasonable.

charliegolf
27th Feb 2018, 22:52
Considering we'll be 3D-printing replacement organs in a few years (using the recipient's stem cells, so no need to worry about rejection), this seems to matter about as much as figuring out how many angels can dance on the head of a pin.

That's great news. Unless you need an organ in the intervening 'few' (40) years.

CG

racedo
27th Feb 2018, 23:20
In Singapore there is assumed consent but you may opt out if you wish. If you do opt out you are at the back of the waiting list behind everyone who didnít opt out if you ever need a transplant.

Seems fair and reasonable.

If need then just opt back in :E

MG23
27th Feb 2018, 23:36
That's great news. Unless you need an organ in the intervening 'few' (40) years.

True, this is the NHS we're talking about.

But, in the rest of the world, it won't be anything like 40 years. Medicine is about to become another branch of technology.

Tankertrashnav
28th Feb 2018, 00:14
In my will there is a small bequest to the local donkey sanctuary just down the road. I assume that my Nok would not be able to alter this to the local cats' home after I die. Why then should any family member have the right to go against my wish to donate organs? I've told my family that if there is any of this nonsense after I shuffle off then I will come back and haunt them!

visibility3miles
28th Feb 2018, 19:24
Often, a person already said they wanted to donate their organs before they died, but this information gets lost or their relatives weren't told.

Given that organ donation IS the gift of life to someone else, the wishes of the donor should outweigh others desires to cling to the past.

You can't bring back the dead by insisting that their remains remain intact and can't be used to help others live.

visibility3miles
28th Feb 2018, 19:32
You do age out of the donor system, so perhaps those who opt out aren't actually on the donor list anyway

RAT 5
28th Feb 2018, 19:32
If the contents of a will are reasonable are they not incontestable? except in very exceptional circumstances. Is not organ donation, even by not opting out, a form a declaration included in the will? Therefore how can relatives over-ride what is a reasonable wish?

CloudHound
28th Feb 2018, 21:55
I struggled with the concept of signing up to organ donation for years. Turned out I had an irrational fear that it would hasten my death.

Silly or what?

A relative had a transplant in the nick of time which kinda brought it home. He's now leading a much better life.

I like the question "if you'd take an organ why not gift an organ?"

Cremating viable tissue is morally wrong and I'd ask you to look someone in the eye on the transplant list and tell them you will deny them their chance of life.

419
28th Feb 2018, 22:30
I like the question "if you'd take an organ why not gift an organ?"

Personally, I think it should go a bit further than that.
If you are not willing to allow your organs to be used after your death, why should you be able to avail yourself of blood or blood products should you need it after an accident, emergency or routine operation?

After all, hasn't that blood also been donated by people who willingly gave it free of charge so that it could be used by others?

G-CPTN
28th Feb 2018, 23:35
I received a significant amount of blood during and following a major surgical operation.
As I had been a regular blood donor for 30 years previously, I was aware of the need to replenish stocks, however, having been a major recipient, I am now disqualified from doning (because of the risk that I might have received contaminated blood).

Gertrude the Wombat
1st Mar 2018, 09:54
In saying that surely the waiting list should give priority to those who have not opted out, that might sharpen a few minds!
I'm happy to listen to evidence. But the last evidence that was brought to my attention was that Panorama programme, to which I've never seen a response.

krismiler
1st Mar 2018, 12:49
Back in the old days before the internet, you could carry an “Organ Donor” card around with you which gave consent in the event you were involved in an accident. Checking would have been much more difficult in those days especially with the time sensitive nature of a transplant so the card was the best solution.

These days you could simply register yes or no online and it could be easily checked if needed in a hospital.

G-CPTN
1st Mar 2018, 13:03
What folks need to realise, is that to be an organ donor, 'death' is not enough - you must be on a life-support system with no chance of recovery - usually 'brain dead' with your vital functions provided by machinery.

Of course this rules out most fatalities - which is why we need so many potential organ donors to meet the demand of those in need.

Riding a motorcycle is a good way to encourage the right circumstances.

Planemike
1st Mar 2018, 13:11
I shall certainly be opting out..... Mind you at 72 I wonder how much of me would be of any use.

Fareastdriver
1st Mar 2018, 15:29
Mind you at 72 I wonder how much of me would be of any use.

keep a 75 year old going for a few years.