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Kelly Hopper
8th Feb 2018, 14:35
I have had a lifetime playing and dealing with classic sports cars so am no novice but I came across a situation at the weekend that is somewhat puzzling to me:

A lot of cars have increased hugely in value recently (I wish I had kept some of them) but I found one on eday at about 20% of it's true value! This was an accept price not an auction start price. Fantastic condition, long ownership and so low mileage you cannot imagine.

I emailed the vendor offering his price if it was as he says. 10 minutes later I notice two more cars being offered in similar condition at the same incredibly low price. Now at this point I knew something was wrong so regretted my email, although all he would have got from me was my name and email address.

Within minutes eday removed all 3 adverts so they also smelled a rat.

But this morning a received a nice email from the recipient of my email stating that the car is available, registered in his name, even gave me the reg. and welcomed me to view it. He even offered to deliver it as his cost!

Now I know this is an attempted scam but how? Are they stolen? Do they even exist? I am really puzzled. Any ideas?

UniFoxOs
8th Feb 2018, 14:49
Most likely he will deliver it, you pay him, his "mate" comes to pick him up who turns out to be three heavies, they take away the seller and the classic car with its cloned untraceable numberplate, and your wedge.

Rather be Gardening
8th Feb 2018, 15:32
Ask him to deliver it to you outside your local police station and see what he says.

NutLoose
8th Feb 2018, 15:41
Run it through links as well, also tell him you are bringing the RAC etc to inspect the vehicle

https://www.gov.uk/check-mot-status

https://www.rac.co.uk/buying-a-car/car-passport

https://www.rac.co.uk/buying-a-car/vehicle-inspections/advanced-inspection

Remember if it has finance on it, it is not his to sell, so he gets your wad and the car is repossessed.

But if ebay smell a rat I would too.

MG23
8th Feb 2018, 15:46
I haven't looked recently, but a couple of years ago, there were tons of cars on ebay for $2500 that were worth ten times as much. From what I read at the time, they were scams of some kind, but I don't remember what the scam was. I think it was something along the lines of 'I'm out of the country right now, but send me the money, and I'll get the car delivered to you.'

RedhillPhil
8th Feb 2018, 16:40
If something looks too good to be true it is.

ORAC
8th Feb 2018, 17:21
There is also an awful lot of money laundering going on.

Lots of dirty money you can’t put directly into the bank? Buy items such as cars from private buyers for cash. Resell within a week at a discount for a quick but with a receipt and the money paid legitimately so it goes through the banking system without a flag. Repeat multiple times.

That’s what you also see often in the courts, mone6 laundering shops. No observable business on the high street, but lots of “sales” deposits into the bank.

ethicalconundrum
8th Feb 2018, 17:24
The car will never be avail for some obscure reason. Just tell him you want to take a drive. Don't bring cash, but tell him you'll bring some. The only thing that matters is to see and drive the car.

Above The Clouds
8th Feb 2018, 17:32
Its a complete scam, I replied to one their adverts for an Austin Healey priced at £9500 the picture of the car they used belonged to a friend so I knew it wasn't for sale.

They will not let you come and view the car but insist on delivering it first and if you don't like the car they will take it away, yea right.

I probed them to find out where the car was coming from and then pretended to actually live close to its location so popping round to view was no issue, their messages stopped fairly quickly after that.

They use lots of different user names and eBay accounts all claiming to be business accounts with dozens of cars and motorbikes massively under priced, so what I do now if I see their adverts is report each advert to eBay as fraud then eBay close all their auctions.

Effluent Man
8th Feb 2018, 18:46
Another scam is to ask for a "Holding Deposit" maybe ten per cent. Then of course they flit with that.

Kelly Hopper
9th Feb 2018, 04:29
Thanks for the replies.
I have been checking the comms again and it's not 20% of the true value, it's <10%!
It is portrayed as a 51 year old car 6800 miles!
So if you are going to try to pull a scam like this why not make it a bit more believable?

krismiler
9th Feb 2018, 04:34
Small deposit required perhaps ? Minor issue with shipping requiring money to be sent.

If it sounds good to be true, it is too good to be true.

Scams which are too believable get too many responses which need to be gone through. Only mugs fall for obvious ones and these are what they are trying to find as it's less work.

MungoP
9th Feb 2018, 05:44
I experienced a similar situation a while back with boats being adv at way below market value. When contacted the seller had some convoluted story that might just have been plausible if it wasn't for the fact that two other boats offered were using the same reasons for the sale albeit from 'different' sellers and it quickly became clear that it was a group scam using different e mail addresses. I reported it to the police fraud line as the total sums involved were well into six figures....they were totally uninterested other than for collecting the info for statistical reasons.

blind pew
9th Feb 2018, 07:30
I viewed it but the paperwork wasn’t right..had account details in Belfast to pay the money into after paying a deposit.
The seller said he was an immigration officer but didn’t believe his racist stories. Eventually traced the previous owner who was cagey as yacht had been bought with cash through a broker - five times the legal amount for a cash transaction. Pulled out and then got a message with an image of my house “ we know where you live”.
Went to the PSNI..we have bigger problems than money laundering and “threats”.
Judging by the politicians, their scams and not voting Lord mcnally deformation act into law I can understand the coppers point of view.

Effluent Man
9th Feb 2018, 09:29
In the Motor Trade I knew a chap who regularly used what he referred to as a "Call bird" Scam. He would advertise a car at a low but believable price. When he got enquiries for the car he would tell the respondent that it was sold but he had another coming. He would offer this one at the going rate. It was surprising how often they fell for it.

blind pew
9th Feb 2018, 10:37
Dont get me started..nearly as bad as insurers but the worst was an Opel mantra on Canvey Island that had a new MOT and the seller had owned it for two years.
Opened the bonnet and there was no way it had passed an MOT in the last six months. In the glove compartment was a receipt from Chelmsford auctions dated the previous week. My son went up to the house door, returned and put a screwdriver in his pocket “get out of here dad”.
Drove to Canvey nick where a woman had just been forced off the road by a car driver wearing a crash helmet around the corner from where we had been looking at the car.
Presented the paperwork to the desk officer who phoned the garage that issued the MOT..on Christian names with the bloke whose employee was the boy racer.
Was threatened with theft of the paperwork.

krismiler
9th Feb 2018, 13:13
Couple of scams doing the rounds in Australia at the moment regarding used vehicles:

1. Buyer turns up with a couple of mates to check the car, during the test drive the seller is threatened and forced out on a quiet stretch of road.

2. Buyer turns up for a motorbike sale, leaves his car and fake set of keys with the seller, goes for test ride. Fifteen minutes later seller gets a phone call from buyer claiming he’s been caught speeding and the police want to speak to the registered owner, could he come to a certain location. Buyers mate turns up with real keys and drives car away.

NutLoose
9th Feb 2018, 14:51
Mate many moons ago was selling his MG roadster and decided to clock off a few thousand miles, after much struggling he got the guage out and pulling the back off a little piece of paper fell out with "Ohh No, Not again!" written on it. :E

MG23
9th Feb 2018, 20:14
So if you are going to try to pull a scam like this why not make it a bit more believable?

Because people will fall for it anyway, and the more gullible the mark is, the more likely they are to get away with it?

Thomas coupling
9th Feb 2018, 21:15
Professional scammers carefully place their bait.
By pitching it on the limits of absurdity they attract certain types of victims:
The greedy.
The mentally challenged (to put it politely).
If successful with a bite, the actual transaction becomes relatively easy to complete.
Common car scams:
Buyer turns up with a shortfall of cash and plays the hard up buyer with no more money.
Buyer turns up with bankers cheque for correct amount. Takes car and V5. Weeks later your cashed cheque is debited from your account because it won't clear as it is a counterfeit.
Prospective buyer asks for test drive. Once you hand over the keys you lose control of the transaction: No insurance if car is damaged or stolen.
Car costs: £10000. Purchaser sends you cheque for £12000. Making the excuse they misunderstood the deal. They view car and ask for a cheque for £2000 when they take car.
Cheque for 10k bounces.
NEVER allow any buyer to touch your keys or drive vehicle.
Either take cash or electronic transfer (chaps - which is instant).
Never walk into a bank with more than 5k in cash. They wont accept due to money laundering laws.

Alsacienne
9th Feb 2018, 21:25
You might consider posting on www.scamwarners.com to help others not fall for these scammers ... particularly the 'over-payment' scam.

Effluent Man
9th Feb 2018, 21:56
Would anybody accept a cheque from somebody they did not know?

G-CPTN
9th Feb 2018, 22:01
When I sold my last car I was afraid that I might be given counterfeit cash, and I took advice from my bank as to what to look for - they even gave me a special pen to check the notes.
In the event, the buyer took me to my own bank and drew out the money which I passed straight to my friendly (who knew me) cashier and paid it straight into my account.
Even had it have been counterfeit it was the bank's problem!

feueraxt
10th Feb 2018, 05:22
It's not uncommon for scammers to find a photo of an attractive car on the internet and use that photo in their ebay advert.

It may be an idea to use the image search function at images[dot]google[dot]com and see if the photo has been lifted from another site.

Effluent Man
10th Feb 2018, 07:46
A chap I know in the trade took a banker's draft for fifteen grand in payment for a Porsche 911. When he presented it they told him that it was a genuine draft but had been stolen and they would nae pay out. The car had meanwhile been sold on to a third party down in that there London. Police said it wasn't stolen as he handed cover the keys, insurers said the same.

Pontius Navigator
10th Feb 2018, 09:02
SiL sold a car, cant remember the process, price agreed etc. To his surprise 3 boyos drove over from Belfast. Paid for car and off to pick up a second.

To say he was sh1tting bricks is to put it mildly. All military tell ta!es were hidden. In the event is was a very smooth transaction.

Blues&twos
10th Feb 2018, 09:10
Thomas coupling - you advise against allowing a buyer to touch keys or drive your car.
I'm pretty sure most genuine buyers in a private sale wouldn't buy a used car unless they had test driven it. I certainly wouldn't.

419
10th Feb 2018, 09:17
Never walk into a bank with more than 5k in cash. They wont accept due to money laundering laws.

Where did you get this from?
I recently paid in slightly over £11,000 in cash to at my local Natwest bank with no problem at all.

All that money laundering regulations require is that when dealing with cash sums above €10k, the bank is required to satisfy themselves that the money came from a legal source.

VP959
10th Feb 2018, 10:10
Where did you get this from?
I recently paid in slightly over £11,000 in cash to at my local Natwest bank with no problem at all.

All that money laundering regulations require is that when dealing with cash sums above €10k, the bank is required to satisfy themselves that the money came from a legal source.

Spot on. I paid in around £30k in cash a year or so ago and there was no problem, other than the cashier having to fill in a form with a fair few questions on it. IIRC, they also wanted to see some independent ID, other than the card, but my driving licence was OK. Took a few minutes longer than a normal transaction, but that was all.

The same thing applies when drawing out large sums. I had to pay one or two contractors who were helping build our new house in cash, and the process was similar to that when I paid in a lot of cash.

Pontius Navigator
10th Feb 2018, 10:52
When I retired, to save days lost transferring my gratuity to a high interest account I withdrew it in cash and walked it to the building society next door.

I had warned the bank but they didn't believe me. Instead of having it all ready in used notes, properly sealed in bank bags, they had to raid the safe and count it all there.

Next door was one of those joint estate agent/savings offices. They didnt believe us either when we asked for a private office, until we started unloading. Apart from them now having too much cash on the premises, it worked, but what fun.

VP959
10th Feb 2018, 11:21
When I retired, to save days lost transferring my gratuity to a high interest account I withdrew it in cash and walked it to the building society next door.

I had warned the bank but they didn't believe me. Instead of having it all ready in used notes, properly sealed in bank bags, they had to raid the safe and count it all there.

Next door was one of those joint estate agent/savings offices. They didnt believe us either when we asked for a private office, until we started unloading. Apart from them now having too much cash on the premises, it worked, but what fun.

Reminds me of the first house we bought. We were pretty tight for money, and I'd spotted a book in Smiths called something like "do it yourself conveyancing". The book had a pack of all the forms needed, with full instructions, so I decided I'd make the purchase myself. Part of the money for the new house was a mortgage cheque from the building society and part of it was from our savings (we weren't allowed to do a bank transfer at that time - that was strictly for professionals only).

The vendors solicitor I was dealing with was a PITA, right from the start, as he just didn't like the idea of a "normal" person doing what he saw as a solicitors job. The final hassle from him was on completion day, when I had to wait for him to get the keys from the vendor after they had moved out, then go in to his office to pay him, and he would only accept the building society cheque and cash, he wouldn't even take a bankers draft.

So, I drew out all of our savings in cash, carried it across the street to his office in one of those canvas bags the banks used to use and went through the completion process with him. At the point where I was about to hand him the bag of cash and the cheque I paused, waiting for him to speak. He looked at me a little curiously, until I prompted him that there was a form of words that we needed to exchange in order to make the completion legally binding. He asked what these words were, I told him that he was the professional, as he had pointed out to me repeatedly over the few weeks previously, so he should know better than I.

He went off and looked through some book on law, found the phrase, said it to me, I gave the correct reply and we exchanged the money for the keys.

I will add that he had the good grace to say afterwards that he had been wrong to be so awkward in dealing with me previously.

G-CPTN
10th Feb 2018, 11:31
In 1988 I bought a new car (as in brand new, no previous owner).
I withdrew the cash for it from my account (and was surprised how small the resulting package of notes was - I had arrived with an empty briefcase - remembering the films).
The car salesman was taken aback and panicked - having never previously been faced with the situation - and really didn't know what to do.

VP959
10th Feb 2018, 12:39
The last three new cars I've bought I've paid for by debit card. The first time I did this, putting the card in the machine and typing in my PIN, I didn't believe it would work, but the car salesman said that it would, but that we might have to wait for a phone call. Sure enough my bank rang the dealer within a minute, asking to speak with me. I answered a couple of questions and they authorised the payment. The two other times I bought new cars from the same dealer (and each was an outright purchase, not a part-ex) my bank didn't even bother with the phone call, but authorised the payment immediately. I assume they must keep records of "trusted transactions" or something.

M.Mouse
10th Feb 2018, 13:12
My partner used to work in accounts at a BMW dealership which was part of a nationwide group. They were not allowed to accept more than £10,000 in cash under any circumstances. Something to do with money laundering legislation. It may have been a company restriction to avoid necessary paperwork if accepting more.

This resulted in some unpleasant scenes with members of the fine upstanding 'traveller' community who only ever wanted to pay in cash for some reason.

Effluent Man
10th Feb 2018, 13:52
Around ten years ago I bought a Mercedes SLK from a Geordie property developer who had run short of funds. He drove down the Great North Road, I drove up it. We met at a roadside diner near Grantham and I handed over 23 grand in a a Tesco carrier bag. Got a few odd looks as we drank our coffee with him counting it.

Tashengurt
10th Feb 2018, 13:58
Police said it wasn't stolen as he handed cover the keys, insurers said the same.

Utter bollox. Of course it was stolen. A person steals if they dishonestly appropriate property, belonging to another with the intention of permanently depriving that person of it.
If you're paying with a stolen bankers cheque you're dishonestly appropriating.

Effluent Man
10th Feb 2018, 15:04
That would have been my view too, the car sat on a forecourt in West London but he could not get it back. They said the garage had title too it.

MungoP
10th Feb 2018, 15:31
The mentally challenged (to put it politely).

Amazing what some people will fall for.. Darwin effect ?

VP959
10th Feb 2018, 15:32
That would have been my view too, the car sat on a forecourt in West London but he could not get it back. They said the garage had title too it.

I had a different situation where the police told me categorically that I could not get my stolen car back, even though they had found where it was and who had it.

Some months after splitting up with my ex, we bumped into each other in a club. It was not a happy encounter, so I left, with a girl I had met a week or so earlier. My ex saw us leave and must have followed us in her car. I was going to drop my new girlfriend home, but she suggested going back to my place, the first time she'd been there.

I'm guessing that my ex followed us as far as my place (which wasn't our old marital home) and realised that there was a strong probability that my new girlfriend was going to stay the night.

I woke up the next morning, looked out of the window and saw that my car had gone. I rang the police, who came around pretty quickly and took down the details. About an hour or so later they rang me to say the car was parked outside my ex's parents house, and having spoken to my ex they were taking no further action, as my ex still had a set of keys for the car. I argued that it was registered in my name, that I had a receipt in my name and even had insurance for it that was only in my name, but they refused to act.

As it happened the car (a highly tweaked Mini) was due for an MOT in a few weeks and I knew that it needed a lot of work to the body shell (new cills, probably a repair, or even replacement rear subframe and a few other bits). A friend and I hatched a plot to recover all the parts that were of value on the car, like the wheels and tyres, the Corbeau seats, the extra instrument panel and the newly rebuilt engine and gearbox.

We did this at night, by going over to where the car was parked, pushing it up a track some way from the ex-in-laws house, and very quietly stripping virtually everything off the car, leaving it as a pretty much empty shell.

Apparently my ex reported this to the police, as an officer came around to see me to ask if I knew anything about it. I denied all knowledge, and he just smiled.

There was a finale to this, as the empty shell was blocking the access to a field and the farmer complained and the complaint came back to me, as the registered owner. I told him the car had been stolen and told him the police knew the identity of the thief, so he should talk to them. I never heard a thing about it, but assume my ex was lumbered with having to get the shell shifted to a scrapyard.

G-CPTN
10th Feb 2018, 15:41
Did you claim on the insurance? :E

VP959
10th Feb 2018, 16:33
Did you claim on the insurance? :E

I was so hard up (young, marriage break up, divorce costs, you name it) that the car was only insured on a cheap, third party, Road Traffic Act, policy, with no fire or theft cover. Not sure you can still get insurance like this, but back then it was the very cheapest insurance you could get.

I ended up buying another Mini, with major engine and transmission damage (centre main bearing had let go, and the bits fell into the gearbox, as they do). IIRC I paid about £100 for it, and spent a few days putting all the bits I'd taken off my old car in it, so ended up with a car with a sound shell, nearly new wheels and tyres and a newly refurbished engine and gearbox, plus the bucket seats etc inside. It was probably worth a lot more when it was finished than the old car that was stolen.

Checkboard
10th Feb 2018, 17:56
So if you are going to try to pull a scam like this why not make it a bit more believable?
So that only the gullible apply.

Car prices are simple to check online. Anyone with the savvy to put up an eBay account with a car has the knowlegde to Google the current market value. 10% off for a quick sale is believable, any more and it's a scam.

How these scams work:

https://www.pistonheads.com/sales/fraudwarnings.asp

Thomas coupling
10th Feb 2018, 21:32
If you hand over your car to a stranger who takes it for a test drive, your insurance is null and void if it never comes back. Believe me on this.
If he crashes it with you sitting next to him you are covered for TP only if you admit to the insurance company that you approved of him driving it. Otherwise they treat it as a: TWOC. Taken without consent. In other words - stolen. Not insured because you handed over the keys. I know many do this to seal the deal but if it turns awkward, you really are stuffed.
Same goes for leaving your keys in the ignition whilst the car is unattended.

Thomas coupling
10th Feb 2018, 21:39
I sold my M3 a couple of years ago for cash: 13k.
Took it to HSBC and staff said sorry can't accept this. I kicked off and the manager was called.
She took me to a quiet office and told me about the money laundering issue.
I asked what is the max you'll accept. She said she wasn't prepared to answer that!
So i offered half. She said no! So i offered 5k. She said yes! So i came back into the bank twice more and left empty handed! Pathetic!

Effluent Man
10th Feb 2018, 22:44
Thirty years ago I had a Ford Sierra stolen from my forecourt. There was no break in and we kept the keys in a separate room that was locked. I successfully claimed on the insurance with a little jiggery pokery. Three years later a cop on night patrol flagged down a Sierra. The car had stock car racing stickers on all the windows. He became suspicious and lifted one. It had engraved glass with the original registration numbers. It turned out that the driver was the friend of a chap who came in the garage regularly. No proof but highly likely I thought.

ExSp33db1rd
10th Feb 2018, 23:57
I'm pretty sure most genuine buyers in a private sale wouldn't buy a used car unless they had test driven it. I certainly wouldn't.

I did, with the owner accompanying me when we first arrived in NZ and bought a quick, cheap car in preference to renting until we got settled and decided on permanent transport.

The mechanical condition seemed OK, but something was niggling away regarding the very low mileage for the model year, only 79,000, however the story for the low useage was, just, believable so I handed over the cash and drove the owner back to his home.

I realised what had been bothering me when we reached 100,000 km - the speedo changed to 200,000 ! I then realised that new cars don't come with 6 blank digits, but 6 000,000's, the "blank"79000 that I had seen included the first 1 painted out !

I confronted the last owner, but he hadn't been the first and claimed that he must have been cheated too. Yeah ! Right !

In fact the car served our purpose for much longer than I had first envisaged, and when I sold it it had the correct sort of mileage for its age, so was a reasonable prospect and I got the then market value for it as a trade in. Not too much pain, but one lives and learns.

Above The Clouds
15th Feb 2018, 20:09
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Beautiful-Austin-Healey-3000/232666884786?hash=item362c06eab2:g:KNAAAOSwaC9aherW

An Austin Healey with a starting bid of £0.99 come on really.

With a whole pile of adverts selling cars and bikes for £0.99 !!!

Place a bid and ask some questions, see how long it takes for them all to be deleted. The one above has been deleted already within 5 mins of posting on here. :D:D:D

Ebay name paul.peg

Business address

peg

Address:
37a the cresent
stapleford
nottingham
Nottinghamshire
ng98ja
United Kingdom

Based in United Kingdom, paul.peg has been an eBay member since 01 Apr, 2010

Items for sale.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/paul.peg/m.html?_nkw=&_armrs=1&_ipg=&_from=

Effluent Man
15th Feb 2018, 21:43
I had always assumed that the starting price was because nobody had yet put a bid in.

charliegolf
15th Feb 2018, 21:59
Professional scammers carefully place their bait.
By pitching it on the limits of absurdity they attract certain types of victims:
The greedy.
The mentally challenged (to put it politely).
If successful with a bite, the actual transaction becomes relatively easy to complete.
Common car scams:
Buyer turns up with a shortfall of cash and plays the hard up buyer with no more money.
Buyer turns up with bankers cheque for correct amount. Takes car and V5. Weeks later your cashed cheque is debited from your account because it won't clear as it is a counterfeit.
Prospective buyer asks for test drive. Once you hand over the keys you lose control of the transaction: No insurance if car is damaged or stolen.
Car costs: £10000. Purchaser sends you cheque for £12000. Making the excuse they misunderstood the deal. They view car and ask for a cheque for £2000 when they take car.
Cheque for 10k bounces.
NEVER allow any buyer to touch your keys or drive vehicle.
Either take cash or electronic transfer (chaps - which is instant).
Never walk into a bank with more than 5k in cash. They wont accept due to money laundering laws.

They accepted my £9500 ok.

CG

M.Mouse
15th Feb 2018, 22:10
An Austin Healey with a starting bid of £0.99 come on really.

I have sold two legitimate classic motorcycles on ebay both with a starting bid of 0.99p and no reserve.

It is how I sell anything on ebay.

Both motorcycles reached very healthy final selling prices.

From experience if you place a reserve or a high starting price the sale will generally attract less interest.

Ex Maintainer
15th Feb 2018, 23:32
A few years ago we saw a beautiful caravan at a show in Brisbane. Decided to buy and paid a small deposit.

I Just couldn't shake the feeling something was wrong, so we went to the dealership on the south side and they were very pleasant and showed us around, no problems. They were quite busy as i recall moving stuff and doing general dealer ship things in the yard.

After we returned home we paid the balance of the deposit.

Some weeks later we received a letter informing us that the company had gone bust and we lost our deposit, $5000.

Moral of the story? ALWAYS listen to that feeling that will not go away. If it ain't right, then it ain't right!

Fortunately, in our case it had a happy ending and a year later, we brought home our caravan. :)

krismiler
16th Feb 2018, 00:34
Risky if you make a mistake in the listing and the advert only shows up to people who know how to look for errors.

Effluent Man
16th Feb 2018, 07:06
No it's not risky. You are not selling without a reserve price, it's just a way of encouraging an opening bid. The biggest risk on E bay is that the high bidder is a no show. I had that happen a couple of times so stopped using e bay.

M.Mouse
16th Feb 2018, 08:29
Risky if you make a mistake in the listing and the advert only shows up to people who know how to look for errors.

What?

You mean like I might get run over if I cross the road without looking?

Ever heard of proof reading?

UniFoxOs
16th Feb 2018, 09:34
From experience if you place a reserve or a high starting price the sale will generally attract less interest.

Too true, I've sold half a dozen vehicles starting at 0.99, all sold for good prices. It also keeps your ebay fees down.

krismiler
17th Feb 2018, 00:47
What if someone is using a sniping program ? Everyone is holding back their bids till the last second so as not to push the price up, someone jumps in at the last half second with a £10 increment to the current bid and wins.

Fareastdriver
17th Feb 2018, 09:24
When you bid you also put in your highest bid. That means that if something is at £150 and you bid £160 with your highest bid at £200 those following with highest bids below £200 will still be outbid by you.

Should something be sitting at £80 and you are prepared to pay £200 then you put in a bid for £90 with a top bid of £200. The bidding figure will advance with other peoples highest bid but if that is only £150 then you will get it for about £155.

VP959
17th Feb 2018, 11:24
You can also put a reserve price on, as already mentioned. That means it won't sell unless the price reaches or exceeds the reserve, and bidders can't see the reserve price.

All told I think that if you know what you're doing, Ebay seems to work reasonably well. Like any auction you do need to be pretty aware of all the risks and how best to mitigate them, though.

Effluent Man
17th Feb 2018, 12:17
The problem I found with E bay was this: I had a reasonably modern Citroen C5 estate car with a running problem. I listed it specifying what was wrong and received bids to a figure that was acceptable. In the last few hours of the listing a bidder who lived 300 miles away ran the car up much higher. He won the bidding but just disappeared. I've not used it again since.

Above The Clouds
17th Feb 2018, 20:04
Well here is another £0.99 starting bid for an Austin Healey, guess what its already been sold for over £65-000, ask me how I know :oh:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/1962-AUSTIN-HEALEY-3000-MK2-RALLY-SPEC-25000-KM/202231918074?hash=item2f15f62dfa:g:dJYAAOSwlxRaiI5-

Same MO everything on their website starts at £0.99 or selling for a family member, quick sale for £7000.00 !!!!

E-mail the seller directly at - [email protected]

Business seller information
http://www.ebay.co.uk/usr/harty662?_trksid=p2047675.l2559

Harty662 (533)

13 Kennedy Green
Beadnell
Northumberland
NE675DD
United Kingdom

krismiler
18th Feb 2018, 04:18
A sniping program works by putting in a higher bid seconds before the auction finishes. If the current bid is £100 pounds it will offer £101 a couple of seconds before the sale ends and the other bidders higher offers have a chance to be applied. Even though their maximum bids may be considerably higher there isn’t time for the system to register a snipe bid and counter with a higher offer.

No one wants to bid the price up at the beginning so the higher offers come later.

gruntie
18th Feb 2018, 07:51
Even though their maximum bids may be considerably higher there isn’t time for the system to register a snipe bid and counter with a higher offer.

Sorry, disagree. A sniping program works by giving insufficient time for HUMANS to react and put in a higher bid in an effort to win an auction. If someone has already entered a higher maximum bid - higher than the maximum bid entered on the snipe - or, they are also using a sniping program, and have entered a higher maximum - it will simply raise the price to the other bidder, who will still win.

The rules seem fairly simple. Decide the maximum value to you of the item concerned, above which you wouldn’t mind being outbid - and enter that as your maximum, and then leave it alone. Using a snipe program hopefully negates the numpties who sit at a keyboard trying to outbid each other - and you - at the last second, so you might get it a bit cheaper. Or you might not: if someone really wants it, and has put in an outlandish maximum to ensure success, then they will win. So let them.

Wriggly Monkey
18th Feb 2018, 08:15
I've always thought that Ebay got the website wrong in the first place. In a normal auction a lot stays current until bidding ceases. It would have been better (from the sellers point of view) for Ebay to replicate that. The auction remains live until there have been no further bids for a period - e.g 5 minutes. That would ensure the highest bidder gets it and maximise the price for the seller.

BSD
18th Feb 2018, 12:26
I have a couple of old classics. Last year, someone emailed me out of the blue, alerting me to an eBay sale item: the original log book of one of my cars, issued in 1959. For £1500!

I emailed the seller pointing out that I owned the car, it was still roadworthy (used regularly) and I had the present V5c document (which has superseded the original logbook fo non-uk readers) and that I also had an original logbook.

Whilst I'm convinced the logbook seller wasn't a scammer, after our emails, the item was repriced at £149.

I haven't read through all 4 pages of this thread, so forgive me if this has been said before, but I wouldn't put pictures of your old limos on t'internet, particularly if you show reg plates. Too easy for them to be copied and then used in a false sale attempt.

Similarly, 2 years ago, I was looking for a more modern car. One came up on pistonheads which seemed too good to be true in terms of price, mileage etc. Pistonheads website actually has a guidance page on how to spot scammers. This ad ticked several of their boxes. Once reported to pistonheads, the ad was instantly removed.

Buyer beware has never been more relevant in this scammers paradise world!

M.Mouse
19th Feb 2018, 09:11
No one wants to bid the price up at the beginning so the higher offers come later.

Not my experience with over 400 sales on ebay. You have to remember the majority of people are not deep or strategic thinkers. I guarantee that any item worth bidding for that has a starting price of 99p WILL attract bids in no time at all. The price will quickly rise. The fact that someone using a sniping program might win the item is irrelevant because generally more thyan one person will be doing so. What happens is the price quickly rises with the less savvy bidders then in the last seconds the sniping programs do their stuff and the highest sniper wins.

I've always thought that Ebay got the website wrong in the first place. In a normal auction a lot stays current until bidding ceases. It would have been better (from the sellers point of view) for Ebay to replicate that. The auction remains live until there have been no further bids for a period - e.g 5 minutes. That would ensure the highest bidder gets it and maximise the price for the seller.

Impossible without holding a sale at a specific time and all potential bidders being available at that time. Ebay may be misnamed as an 'auction' site but its model works even though it cannot possibly replicate a real auction.

There are, of course, real online auctions anyway.

Wriggly Monkey
19th Feb 2018, 09:38
Impossible without holding a sale at a specific time and all potential bidders being available at that time. Ebay may be misnamed as an 'auction' site but its model works even though it cannot possibly replicate a real auction.
Why so? It would be no different to the Ebay model as it currently is, except the end time of the auction would be predicated on the time of the last bid. It would not stop someone, as is currently the case, putting in the maximum that are prepared to pay some time in advance. Perhaps the clever solution would have been an option to have either "fixed term" or "open until after some fixed time after last bid". As a seller I want the best price I can get. If there are two people using sniping S/W that potentially means the auction still has some legs in it and the fixed end puts an artificial constraint that potentially restricts the final price.

Fareastdriver
19th Feb 2018, 11:20
You can say what you like. Ebay isn't going to change.

goofer3
19th Feb 2018, 12:42
WM. If you want the best price then the best way is to have it on for 7 - 10 days, not 5 minutes after the first bid.