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Tankertrashnav
6th Feb 2018, 00:22
The High Court has rejected the US request for the extradition of computer hacker Lauri Love to stand trial in that country. In rejecting the request the High Court has nevertheless recommended that the CPS proceed with a prosecution in the English courts. The US authorities have 14 days to appeal, although the general feeling is that such an appeal would be unlikely to be successful

Lauri Love case: Hacking suspect wins extradition appeal - BBC News (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-42946540)

Mr Love is alleged to have stolen huge amounts of data from US agencies, including the Federal Reserve, the US army, the defence department, Nasa and the FBI in a spate of online attacks in 2012 and 2013.

Personally I feel that if they haven't already done so the US authorities should be going after those who were responsible for cyber security in the Federal Reserve etc, and should also be considering a large ex gratia payment to Mr Love for demonstrating that these large and important organisations could have their systems hacked by one individual working on a PC in his bedroom!

Any thoughts?

Super VC-10
6th Feb 2018, 06:28
People like this should not be treated as criminals. Governments would do well to employ them either to try and hack into their own systems and reveal where their own security is lacking, or to try and hack into the systems of foreign governments of interest. Far more efficient use of taxpayers money than long drawn out extradition hearings, appeals and prosecution.

Krystal n chips
6th Feb 2018, 06:52
Here's the C4 News report ( interested readers can also find an interview with Mr Love immediately after this report ) on why the much maligned ( on here ) UK judicial system does have its merits.

https://www.channel4.com/news/alleged-hacker-avoids-extradition-to-us

There's a suitably aggrieved cousin, a cyber security expert no less, making the expected noises, but seemingly missing the somewhat closer to home reality that these organisations appear to have holes the size of the Mersey and Channel tunnels in the cyber security.

And, as already been suggested, if he has this capability, which he clearly has, as did Gary McKinnon, then a quiet talk and some, well quite a lot actually, remuneration would be a logical path to follow.

It also begs the question of course, given these organisations were allegedly hacked by an amateur, how vulnerable are they to professional and state supported hackers.

VP959
6th Feb 2018, 08:28
It's all about politics, I think. Those who provided those systems will undoubtedly be in a position of influence and they don't want the story to be about their failings in not making secure systems.

If a lone hacker working from his home here in the UK can get in, then I suspect that it's a near-certainty that the real bad actors (and we can guess at least two or three nation states that might have those) will have also hacked into those systems.

Keeping the media focussed on one loner with Asbergers and making him out to be the only one with the knowledge to do this is probably a deflection tactic, to avoid them having to admit that far more dangerous hackers may well have been able to do as he has done.

The fact that they identified him was probably more down to him working alone from his home and making himself trackable in some way. Probably not the obvious ways of tracking people, but there are subtle ways of working out the machine, browser etc that a single hacker is using. The professionals know this, and avoid it, making them really hard to pin down, but my guess is that this chap was probably doing it for the challenge of trying to crack their systems and didn't care about the data. He may not even have thought he was doing anything really criminal - once focussed on the intellectual challenge of gaining access that may well be all he was thinking about.

As I understand it he didn't pass any data to anyone else, wasn't a part of a network and was working alone, for his own amusement. As above, they would be better off using his talents to show them where the weaknesses in the systems are, rather than prosecute him.

Had he been part of an organised network out to profit in some way from hacking these systems then I think things would have been very different, and extradition may well have been granted. That might imply that he was working in league with other "enemies of the state", but clearly that doesn't seem to be the case here at all.

charliegolf
6th Feb 2018, 08:28
Had he stolen the secrets of Israel or Russia, an extradition warrant may not have been needed!

CG

Golf-Sierra
6th Feb 2018, 13:05
It also begs the question of course, given these organisations were allegedly hacked by an amateur, how vulnerable are they to professional and state supported hackers.

Perhaps the whole exercise is undertaken in order to make credible the existence of such security vulnerabilities?

West Coast
7th Feb 2018, 06:56
People like this should not be treated as criminals.

By “like this”, are you referring to his medical condition or what he’s done with the computer?

Super VC-10
7th Feb 2018, 09:53
By “like this”, are you referring to his medical condition or what he’s done with the computer?

Both combined. There are people with Aspergers that won't have the capacity to do what he did. There are people with the capacity to do what he did that don't have Aspergers. Suspect the latter group would offer their expertise to the authorities instead of getting themselves into trouble, if that is where their interest lies.

charliegolf
7th Feb 2018, 10:02
I may be misleading the signals, but I sense that people are linking his Aspergers with an inability to know what he was doing was wrong; and even criminal. That's balls.

CG

Krystal n chips
7th Feb 2018, 10:32
I may be misleading the signals, but I sense that people are linking his Aspergers with an inability to know what he was doing was wrong; and even criminal. That's balls.

CG

Here you go CG....please watch this interview with him...

https://www.channel4.com/news/lauri-love-it-was-just-a-monumental-relief

Interesting to note his motivation as well.....officialdom across the globe doesn't take too kindly to having their inadequacies exposed.

Hereafter " do come in Mr Love, help yourself to tea,coffee and biscuits....we represent an organisation that feels you may have some considerable potential that would be extremely beneficial to us "

Tankertrashnav
7th Feb 2018, 11:00
With cyber warfare, both in the security and commercial sense an ever increasing threat, what would be criminal would be failing to put this man's skills to use in fighting that threat.

The phrase "poacher turned gamekeeper" springs to mind.

Nice to be in wholehearted agreement for once, K & C ;)

charliegolf
7th Feb 2018, 11:20
Should we let paedophiles out (or let them off), and pay them a good salary if they promise not to kiddie fiddle, but catch paedophiles for us?

CG

RatherBeFlying
7th Feb 2018, 18:03
The FBI and NSA could use his talents as well, especially if he could pass the drug test:p

These agencies have a serious recruiting problem as many talented hackers indulge in certain prohibited substances:=

The FSB has no such scruples:E

beeg0d
7th Feb 2018, 18:58
Should we let paedophiles out (or let them off), and pay them a good salary if they promise not to kiddie fiddle, but catch paedophiles for us?

CG
Funny you mention that....

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/crime/operation-sanctuary-paedophile-police-pay-child-sex-gang-ring-paid-money-10000-northumbria-a7885711.html

Tankertrashnav
9th Feb 2018, 00:15
No I dont think we should let paedophiles out, in their case demonstrable harm has been done as a result of their actions. In Love's case I have yet to see that he actually did anything with the information he obtained - he seemed to be gaining access to these sites not for any other reason than just to prove to himself that he could. Therein lies the difference