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robertbuenos
5th Feb 2018, 09:11
Hi,

I'd like to know the translation of the french word "rotation" = the set of legs between you leave home and you come back home.

Longhaul exemple : LHR-JFK(nightstop)-LHR.
Shorthaul exemple : LHR-EDI-LHR-FRA(nightstop)-LHR-CDG-LHR-MXP(nightstop)-LHR.

If anybody can help, thanks !

lidal
5th Feb 2018, 09:36
Hi
From what i read i would mean the all job legs until you get back to departure base airport.
otherwise it is days on days off type of working job.
Hope it helps
Cheers

wiggy
5th Feb 2018, 09:45
Hi,

I'd like to know the translation of the french word "rotation" = the set of legs between you leave home and you come back home.

Longhaul exemple : LHR-JFK(nightstop)-LHR.
Shorthaul exemple : LHR-EDI-LHR-FRA(nightstop)-LHR-CDG-LHR-MXP(nightstop)-LHR.

If anybody can help, thanks !

In our company that would be a “Trip”.

ExXB
5th Feb 2018, 10:16
Journey?


x

beeg0d
5th Feb 2018, 10:25
Concidering the word rotation implys something circulair i would suggest "round trip" would be the closest english usage. Alough simply "trip" and "journey" would work too.

wiggy
5th Feb 2018, 10:35
Might depend on the airlines format.

On our paperwork and electronic rostering stuff we have “trip” reports or “trip descriptions” that match the sort of format the OP uses in the original post, and having done a few French tax returns over the years and looked at supporting documents and websites what looks like a French “rotation” looks very much like one of our “trips”...

Then again as you say “journey” might be just as valid, which word to use might depend on the context of the translation.

Takan Inchovit
5th Feb 2018, 10:43
Le voyage?

wiggy
5th Feb 2018, 11:32
Le voyage?
Have I got it wrong? I thought the Op wanted translation from French into English...?

Certainly the French “fisc” and other officials use and understand “rotation” as the term to describe a sequence of connected flights on a roster.....in U.K. English I’d still stick with “trip” when dealing with U.K. civil servants/officials to describe the same..

For us (UK airline) something like a shorthaul LHR-CDG-LHR-GLA-LHR or longhaul LHR-JFK-LHR would each be a single "trip", and would be given a unique "trip number", and all these trips would be laid out in a "trip description" section of the bidding pack or software of our bidding/rostering system. You would then talk about having "trip 8062" or perhaps just a "JFK trip"....

Dealing with the general public I guess the use of "trip" might not quite work, hence perhaps the need for knowing the context of the OP's question.

Pontius Navigator
5th Feb 2018, 11:49
Rotation was used in annual troop movements such as the Group of Soviet Forces Germany. In the UK, to be perverse, we call our Rotation Roulement.

DaveReidUK
5th Feb 2018, 11:51
I always though a rotation was a reference to an aircraft turning round between outbound and inbound sectors. :O

In recent years, I've also seen the term "tour" applied to the sequence of sectors that a short-haul aircraft operates in a single day, typically including a number of rotations.

Pontius Navigator
5th Feb 2018, 17:30
Sounds like an in-house or company thing rather than a national definition.

RatherBeFlying
5th Feb 2018, 18:04
Out here in North America, workers on a remote jobsite will be on a rotation of say, two weeks on, one week off.

Looks like the grenouilles use the word the same way in the sense of rotation on and off shift.

Jack D
5th Feb 2018, 20:45
It means, in the aviation duty sense, departure from home base until return/arrival at home base e.g a 5 day rotation. Closest equivalent in English might be, for example, a 5 day round trip, or simply a ... insert no. of days .. trip, as has been suggested.For departure and return on the same day a “turn around” might be appropriate.

sitigeltfel
6th Feb 2018, 08:36
Trajet, itinéraire ?

robertbuenos
6th Feb 2018, 13:26
thanks you !

Chronus
6th Feb 2018, 19:52
I`d stick with the French version. Transalting it back to French: Les jambes entre en quittant et en revenir a votre maison.