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View Full Version : Nice lady needs a new telly. I'm taking her to the telly shop


Loose rivets
28th Jan 2018, 23:55
But what to buy. She had a few bob and spent it on an expensive Panasonic 10 years ago. I have failed to get it going yet mostly because she's keen to get updated. But I know nothing about modern tellies.

She's got a sound system. She needed an intelligent telly - has BT fast thing.

40" would be a minimum.

Now, How to Geek says LG and Samsung lead the market. (they're both going for that mini - many of - led system. ) But for ordinary mortals, is it a 4k or less since the price diff is not too great these days.

Recording and playing back while recording. Way past my VHS set. But what to recommend in this bright new world this old telly mender needs to ask.

Impress to inflate
29th Jan 2018, 00:00
I bought an LG OLED curved 55"TV 18 months ago and WOW, what a great picture. Since I bought mine, they now do it in 4K. I have linked mine with a SONOS sound bar and the whole package is the dog's knackers. Great picture and the curve is subtle and helps give a great view of the screen. It has the magic wand remote that's easy to use.

Bull at a Gate
29th Jan 2018, 01:43
LG OLEDs come in various models for each size. The screen is the same, it’s just the sound which is different.

Very happy with ours, especially the remote control which is easy to use and makes it very simple to connect to internet TV.

Only complaint is the lack of an instruction booklet. There is a quick set up sheet in the box, but nothing else. Nor is one available online. Seems you have to go online with a specific question which is answered by some video demonstration.

rjtjrt
29th Jan 2018, 02:26
Panasonic also have a very well regarded OLED TV. all the OLED TV at present, no matter which manufacturer, use the same LG made OLED panel, but each manufacturer (LG, Panasonic, and Sony are the main ones) uses different electronics to fiddle with the picture seen. They come all have 55” and 65” versions.
If the lady is used to a Panasonic she will probably find the Panasonic version of the OLED easiest to adapt to.
OLED seem to have a much wider viewing angle available than non OLED screens.

UniFoxOs
29th Jan 2018, 08:17
I've had a fair lot of trouble with Samsung kit recently - not the engineering quality but the crappy software. I have a cheapo 40" Goodmans (also available under other brand names) bought as a stopgap when my 50" plasma packed up. It's not 4K (bet I couldn't tell the difference anyway) but it does everything that I want except the digital sound output to feed my surround system is phono (RCA) and I really wanted optical (TOSLink) to mate with the Toshiba. I had to buy a converter for that purpose as the Toshiba doesn't take digital on phono.

meadowrun
29th Jan 2018, 08:40
After my last CRT (28") crapped out, I bought a decidedly cheap 19" Toshiba LCD. And it did work (still does - 6yrs) just fine except it was very much like looking at a computer monitor from 12 feet away.
So got a Toshiba 32" on sale $222.00 all in. The legs now just very barely fit on top of the display cabinet. The worry there is that I live on the ring-of-fire. Not a smart set, don't care. It does talk when I change the volume, but that's it. Going from 19 to 32 really can light up this cave.
I know Toshiba as a company is having a bit of a hardtimelately but the stuff I've bought from them have been good quality bargains, says he typing on a Toshiba laptop getting on 7 years old (upgraded once to SolidState).

SMT Member
29th Jan 2018, 08:54
Bang & Olufsen, of course.

Well, you did say she has 'a few bob' to spend, which I translated into 'she's rather well off'.

Cirrussy
29th Jan 2018, 09:06
Look no further than LG!

JWP1938
29th Jan 2018, 09:11
Well at least I know not to come here for TV advice! Mine needs updating but I haven't a clue what you are all talking about. I just want a good 40" with a good picture and reasonable sound. I'll just go to a local "man who does" and see what he recommends.

CargoMatatu
29th Jan 2018, 09:13
It's a bit like asking GPS users for their recommendations - Garmin or Tom Tom.

Personally, when it comes to nice new smart TVs, I'm a Samsung fan. But the LGs seem to be just as outstanding.

Fareastdriver
29th Jan 2018, 09:21
Big curved screens are OK in small rooms or where there is just one viewer but in a large room anybody on the peripheral will find the picture distorted.

Just got a Samsung 4K OLED 65 flat. Super!!!!!!!!

meadowrun
29th Jan 2018, 09:21
Get thee to a big box electronics shop. Tell them what you want.
Look and listen to them in operation (although the cable has probably been split to a dozen sets).
Check them out on the net first and look for what's on sale.
Then see if the SA river has it cheaper.
Going to the guy probably won't help much.

sitigeltfel
29th Jan 2018, 09:29
Bang & Olufsen, of course.

Well, you did say she has 'a few bob' to spend, which I translated into 'she's rather well off'.


Look no further than LG!

Bang & Thump use LG technology in their TVs. Their sets are just an LG in a posh frock.

gemma10
29th Jan 2018, 12:35
My one year old 49inch LG is superb. The remote is ultra sensitive and becomes annoying, but my main grief is the set cannot be turned off apart from pulling the plug out of the wall. So in contravention to modern thinking my tv is not carbon friendly.

ian16th
29th Jan 2018, 12:44
My one year old 49inch LG is superb. The remote is ultra sensitive and becomes annoying, but my main grief is the set cannot be turned off apart from pulling the plug out of the wall. So in contravention to modern thinking my tv is not carbon friendly.
Don't you have switched sockets, wherever you reside?

gemma10
29th Jan 2018, 12:48
I could have said that but the issue remains

VP959
29th Jan 2018, 13:42
My one year old 49inch LG is superb. The remote is ultra sensitive and becomes annoying, but my main grief is the set cannot be turned off apart from pulling the plug out of the wall. So in contravention to modern thinking my tv is not carbon friendly.

The reason it doesn't have a switch is that it has an "eco" energy saving mode. The power consumption on standby is tiny, just 0.3 W maximum (and less than 0.3 W a fair bit of the time). That's probably not even enough to get your electricity meter out of anti-creep mode to register it (which usually has a 1 Wh threshold over a maximum sampling time of between 20 minutes and an hour).

0.3 W is just 0.0072 kWh over a 24 hour period, or around 0.00108 per day for an electricity unit price of 15p/kWh.

goudie
29th Jan 2018, 14:23
However good the picture/sound on a TV is, most of the programs are still rubbish! Harrumph!

John Marsh
29th Jan 2018, 15:13
Relevant thread creep!:)

Re. tellies that can't be fully turned off - are they designed to be safely left unattended and plugged in? With extra electrical resilience to mains transients, surges, that sort of thing.

If there's a failure, will it be a safe one?

ISTR many years ago, there was a special requirement that devices intended to be left plugged in, e.g. VCRs, clock radios, must be specially designed to allow that. Does this still apply? If so, have the Chinese manufacturers been informed?

Is anyone bothering to conduct random checks on TVs etc, to ensure they are built to any mandated safety standard?

However good the picture/sound on a TV is, most of the programs are still rubbish! Harrumph!

Absolutely!:D The better the (claimed) picture quality, the worse the content becomes!

treadigraph
29th Jan 2018, 17:04
However good the picture/sound on a TV is, most of the programs are still rubbish! Harrumph!

The voice of reason as ever! I bought a 20 something inch smart tv last May, I doubt I've troubled the main terrestrial channels more than once each. Repeats on free view, and have converted all DVDs to mp4 and now on USB HD. That's pretty much all I watch.

Mr Optimistic
29th Jan 2018, 20:19
Is the signal via internet, freeview or what? Does she have any ancient kit which needs scart ? Just bought my first decent TV, insisted on a scart socket which found I don't really need. Sony 40 inch good enough. Have a Roku box for nowtv too. With a 4mbs connection might be a while before 4k becomes a need :)

Looks like the monolith off 2001Space Odessy but I'm happy. Wife was mortified but is mellowing.

Gertrude the Wombat
29th Jan 2018, 20:22
The voice of reason as ever! I bought a 20 something inch smart tv last May, I doubt I've troubled the main terrestrial channels more than once each. Repeats on free view, and have converted all DVDs to mp4 and now on USB HD. That's pretty much all I watch.
None of which encourages me to either replace our existing 21" (I think) CRT telly or buy a licence.

The thing is actually broken ... but only the on-off switch, and for the once or twice a month I turn it on to watch a DVD it's not that big a deal to use the switch on the socket.

Mr Optimistic
29th Jan 2018, 20:25
Netflix and BBC4 HD. Not much else but still worth it.

Fareastdriver
29th Jan 2018, 20:36
I scan youtube on my computer because its faster. When I have found what I want to watch I flag it up on my Smart TV.

Unlimited entertainment for free.

Ancient Mariner
29th Jan 2018, 21:21
Sixty inch Samsung for the missus and 58 inch, I think, LG in my man cave.
Can't tell the difference, both connected to surround systems, might be a difference sound wise.
Per

Loose rivets
29th Jan 2018, 21:36
We went to a big shop today. Nice lady asked more intelligent questions to another nice lady who seemed to know the answers. I stood back and mulled over the advances since I was a telly-mender in 1958.

'Where's the Spot Wobble switch?' almost escaped from my lips, but thankfully the fact my jaw was hanging open only allowed unrecognisable noises which the girls ignored.

100 Hz. coo, that's twice as Hertzy as the old days. 1000 Hz. Surely, some mistake. The lady in the black shirt with red writing picked up on my pointing.

Yes, most are (somewhat less) but this is a thousand. The picture refreshes a thousand times a second? Why would it do that?

This link is more or less as I understood it, but the psychological issues are fascinating. However, the concept of 1000 Hz is something to be puzzled over.

A Beginners Guide to Frame Rates : Aframe (http://aframe.com/blog/2013/07/a-beginners-guide-to-frame-rates/)

O and Q back-lighting takes the purchase over a thousand, so, out of the picture (groan) for now.


All this aside, the prospect of receiving 4k on normal broadcasts still seems a long way off.

Impress to inflate
30th Jan 2018, 10:20
What ever you do purchase, I can highly recommend OLED as it gives the best picture, black pixel MEANS back pixel and not dark grey ohh, and a good sound bar

DroneDog
30th Jan 2018, 14:19
OLED is king by a long way for picture quality, LG (the manufacturer) are leaders in the field and if you watch Netflix or Amazon it's worth seeking an LG OLED flagship set equipped with Dolby Vision.
Paying the extra fee to Netflix for the (higher bandwidth) HDR content is worth it producing stunning breathing taking images, but these OLEDs are quite expensive.

Number two is Samsung, not quite as good or expensive as the LG OLED's but their Q range is very impressive, the Q9 being much better and more expensive than the Q7 or Q5.

OLED - Organic LED

Do not be conned by salespeople trying to sell you LED sets, LED sets only use the LED as a backlight and are nothing like an OLED set which the OLED itself actually emits the light in the display.

ORAC
30th Jan 2018, 17:50
100Hz (120 in USA). PAL - it’s in the name. 100Hz just refreshes both lines each sweep.

Ignore advertising bull***t, even when repeated by pretty ladies...

https://www.lifewire.com/video-frame-vs-screen-refresh-rate-1847855

https://www.cnet.com/news/ultra-hd-4k-tv-refresh-rates/

Mr Optimistic
30th Jan 2018, 19:28
Since getting this new TV I have developed an unhealthy interest in log periodic antenna for K band transmitters. Wish BT would just stick some fibre up the road.

vapilot2004
30th Jan 2018, 20:15
Recording and playing back while recording. Way past my VHS set. But what to recommend in this bright new world this old telly mender needs to ask.


Two HDMI DVRs would accomplish this need, although it may require the need for changing the TVs inputs from the clicker - something older folks do not seem to be very adept at. For the American market there are several full HD NTSC choices available under $200, without paying subscription fees, although PAL choices may be more limited. Some devices can do over the air (from an aerial) recordings, while others require an HDMI source.

I set up an AverMedia box for a friend that enjoys watching F1, but doesn't care to wake up in the middle of the night for the majority of the races and qualifying runs. Scheduled recordings, no subscription, and full HD quality, he's quite happy.

Loose rivets
30th Jan 2018, 23:21
ORAC, what a superb pair of links. Thanks.

I had no idea of the state of play of modern systems, but it really answered a lot of questions* and spelled out two of my observations.

One was why my monitor wouldn't display 72hz having come back to the UK, the system tied it seems to PAL, even though one is not displaying downloaded video. However, I'm not sure what switches off the 72hz option in the extended menu options.

The other is an endorsement of my brain's perceptive abilities and my choice of PLASMA for my replacement set in the US. (replacing Sony's 6m pix light engine machine) I concluded then that much of what is said in the link was beneficial, though just by making a visual comparison in the store. They do however require a low ambient lighting to offset persistence - room lighting we were committed to anyway.


*nowhere was 1000 Hz mentioned, but they did talk of 'creative' descriptions.