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sitigeltfel
28th Jan 2018, 12:18
Reports in yesterday’s La Provence had a story about an incident that occurred in Marseille in the early hours of Saturday morning.

A man, known to police for violence, who was refused entry to a disco in the city, went back to his car and returned with a gun and started threatening the bouncers.
An off-duty cop, who happened to be close by, turned up and a gunfight ensued which left the gunman dead. The gunman fired eight shots, the cop seven and no one else was injured.
So far, so good.

This morning a different scenario has emerged.
Instead of calling 17 for police help, the bouncers knew the off-duty cop was close by and called on him instead of the active police.
He holds the rank of Brigadier, which while sounding impressive, translates as a Lance Corporal in the reserves.

Now for the sticky bit. The gun the cop used was his own personal gun club weapon, not his service one and he is only allowed to have it while travelling between his home and the gun club, something unlikely at 4.30 in the morning!

Was the cop moonlighting as security for the disco and over-reacted to an event? If so, have his actions saved two bouncers and disco patrons from possible death?
Latest reports have the cop still in custody and investigating this will give the police and judicial authorities a major headache.

RAT 5
28th Jan 2018, 13:57
Much might depend on who fired the first shot. If it was the deceased gunman then could not self-defence be brought into the argument? Was the deceased antagonised, aggravated, provoked unfairly by the off-duty cop? Is a cop ever off duty? I can understand the carrying of duty weapons, but do they not always have the right of subdue & arrest as necessary. Does France allow citizens arrest? if so, then an off duty cop would be that at worst.
More facts, and more insight into French law needed.

sitigeltfel
28th Jan 2018, 17:11
The cop has now been charged with "voluntory homicide". Let's see how that pans out!

Fusillade quartier de l'Opéra à Marseille : le policier mis en examen pour homicide volontaire | La Provence (http://www.laprovence.com/actu/en-direct/4811670/fusillade-quartier-de-lopera-a-marseille-le-policier-mis-en-examen-pour-homicide-volontaire.html)

DaveReidUK
28th Jan 2018, 17:48
If the regular police had been called, the suspect would likely be just as dead. French police shoot first and ask questions later.

ShotOne
28th Jan 2018, 21:10
It seems the officer's inappropriate possession of his gun puts him in line for serious charges even before the rights and wrongs of the shootout are considered.

obgraham
28th Jan 2018, 21:22
Either way, the perp has been taken care of.

galaxy flyer
28th Jan 2018, 22:09
As Ambrose Bierce taught us, there are four kinds of homicide, felonious, excusable, justifiable, and praiseworthy. Where this falls is undetermined as of now. Though, I lean somewhere between the last two. Now, the officer’s legal position is still tenuous.

GF

fleigle
28th Jan 2018, 22:25
Well, it is France, presumed guilty, prove your innocence.
f

ShotOne
29th Jan 2018, 08:25
For all the unexplained circumstances of the officer's possession of his weapon, it's worth reflecting that without him this would have been a multiple murder

Animal Mother
29th Jan 2018, 09:00
Play stupid games win stupid prizes.

Pontius Navigator
29th Jan 2018, 13:46
For all the unexplained circumstances of the officer's possession of his weapon, it's worth reflecting that without him this would have been a multiple murder

You presume he would have carried out his threat. Had he shit the bouncers he would still have failed to get entry to the club.

Then as RAT said, who fired first? Maybe the gunman fired in self defence.

sitigeltfel
29th Jan 2018, 14:03
You presume he would have carried out his threat. Had he shit the bouncers he would still have failed to get entry to the club.

Then as RAT said, who fired first? Maybe the gunman fired in self defence.

The policeman's lawyer claims that when he arrived on the scene, he and the bouncers tried to calm things down. At that point the gunman drew his weapon and started shooting, then the policeman drew his and returned fire.

I'm sure the accounts of the incident given by the policeman and the bouncers will agree. ;)

FakePilot
29th Jan 2018, 14:24
Well, it is France, presumed guilty, prove your innocence.
f

I thought French civil code is where "innocent until proven guilty" came from ....

Pontius Navigator
29th Jan 2018, 14:51
Sitigeltfet.
ils diraient que ce ne serait pas

k3k3
29th Jan 2018, 16:28
As Mandy Rice-Davies said.

Gertrude the Wombat
29th Jan 2018, 18:04
I thought French civil code is where "innocent until proven guilty" came from ....
Didn't stop them arresting from arresting me for trying to buy a picnic without my passport on me ...