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magpienja
24th Jan 2018, 19:24
I have seen a consultant and he says my hip is worn...but he considers I wait till it gets much worse before I consider surgery.

I'm happy with that idea.

But...just wondering if my symptoms do reflect a worn out hip joint.

Almost feels like its a muscle prob to me.

If I rest my leg outstretched on a coffee table for instance which is what I like to do watching TV....when I want to lift my leg to move it, its as if the muscle in my leg has gone to sleep me not being able to lift it unless I start it going by lifting with my hand.

Does this sound like its connected to a worn out hip joint.

Lack of mobility is the main prob I have not pain.

vapilot2004
24th Jan 2018, 20:01
I have a personal theory that many of the muscular-skeletal problems we face are from things we do to ourselves. Perhaps try a reclining chair instead of the coffee table leg rest. Hip abductor exercises and stretches led by a sports injury specialist have helped a few older friends regain mobility and enjoy golfing and other sports pain-free again.

I had a serious foot problem that turned out to be caused by a pair of shoes I wore three times a week. A colleague at work was told he would need a knee replacement by two specialists. His wife and the local monk taught him some meditation stretches, and that helped, but it wasn't until he switched aircraft that the symptoms disappeared completely. An elderly aunt suffered from what the doctors diagnosed as advanced RA in her hands, but her daughter discovered aunty's reading habit had her holding books in an odd way and bought her an iPad for reading. Her pain is gone and she is also able to putter about in the garden again too.

I believe repetitive stress injuries go beyond the likes of carpal tunnel syndrome and we often do things to ourselves that over time can lead to a chronic problem that a simple change in habits can resolve. That is not to say that the body doesn't age, or there is not physical change, but if we are willing to pay attention to our posture, regular habits, and resting positions, there is often a behavior change that can cure our ills.

Good luck in finding relief!

atpcliff
24th Jan 2018, 20:09
My wife had constant joint pain, and pain moving down to her ankle. She had arthroscopic surgery and they found no cartilage and leaking sinovial fluid. She had a hip replacement about 10 years after major symptoms started.

I had pain after running about 1.5 miles almost 30 years ago. It has progressed, and I found out I have hip dysplasia, like a German Shepherd. I have intermittent pain in my hip socket, lower back, hamstrings and shin. Sometimes it is worst in my shin. Sometimes it wakes me up at night. The doc said go as long as I can and then get it replaced.

Pontius Navigator
24th Jan 2018, 20:46
Unless your GP is an orthopod he may be no expert andvusualy prescribe antiinflammatory or pain killers.

Try a chiropractor. They are experts in their field and not just backs. I staggered in with a knee problem and walked out 20 minutes later. Still need more treatment but it was good.

Prior to this I had walked too far and had severe hip pain; it was transferred pain from the knee.

funfly
24th Jan 2018, 20:53
Whatever you do don't take Statins, they can cause severe localised muscle pain.

FF

Slow Biker
24th Jan 2018, 21:54
I know it is fashionable to disregard experts, but I imagine yours has some evidence for his diagnosis. I lived on diclofenac for several years, and doubled up with co codamol on bad days. The doc said I was really too young for him to 'cut' me, but come back when I found 18 holes difficult - ha, I always did. Eventually at 53 the deed was done, and I was pain free from that day. Surgeons like to wait as long as possible to delay any future operation, but an uncemented femoral stem is supposed to make future replacement easier; the drawback is six weeks non-weight bearing. Twenty years on still pain free, but no better at golf. As an aside, the RAF paid for private treatment due to the long NHS wait; meanwhile I PVR'd, but the promise was kept.

yellowtriumph
24th Jan 2018, 22:04
I know it is fashionable to disregard experts, but I imagine yours has some evidence for his diagnosis. I lived on diclofenac for several years, and doubled up with co codamol on bad days. The doc said I was really too young for him to 'cut' me, but come back when I found 18 holes difficult - ha, I always did. Eventually at 53 the deed was done, and I was pain free from that day. Surgeons like to wait as long as possible to delay any future operation, but an uncemented femoral stem is supposed to make future replacement easier; the drawback is six weeks non-weight bearing. Twenty years on still pain free, but no better at golf. As an aside, the RAF paid for private treatment due to the long NHS wait; meanwhile I PVR'd, but the promise was kept.

Just to add. My wife suffered from back pain as she grew older caused by her having very strange hips from birth. She could not sit on a motorcycle for example and would need to be winched on and off a horse if she felt the urge to ride one. She had both hips replaced at the age of 40, eighteen years on and having had a routine x-ray and consultation only 3 months ago the surgeon said they are as good and as effective as the day they were replaced.

Pappa Smurf
24th Jan 2018, 23:27
Any leg pain,apart from knees and ankles,especially after exercise could be lack of blood flow.For years my muscles would ache,but after resting for a minute,was able to continue for a few more minutes before repeating.
Have half blocked arteries where the aorta branches off to legs.

NutLoose
24th Jan 2018, 23:38
Magpienja.. are you ex military, if you are visit the military thread and see the sticky at the top

tdracer
25th Jan 2018, 01:08
The rate of complication for joint replacements is relatively high - some of which can be very nasty and even life threating (we used to have a fellow at work that a knee replacement went horribly bad and they ended up having to fuse the joint - imagine going the rest of your life not being able to bend one knee :eek:). That's why most doctors recommend holding off as long as possible.
I've had gradually worsening knee pain for about 20 years - in part because I trashed an ankle in a racing accident 30 years ago and as a result I don't walk right. But I like to stay active, play racquetball, ultimate Frisbee, and ski (which of course just makes the knee pain worse). Last month I had an experimental stem cell procedure done (not cheap, and not covered by insurance). They extract about 60cc of fat tissue, use some process to extract the stem cells, then inject the stem cells into your knees and bloodstream. The idea is the stem cells will regenerate/repair the soft tissues in the joint. It's only been about a month, and it supposedly takes 4 to 12 weeks for noticeable results, but I'm already taking far less ibuprofen than I was a month ago.
You may want to look into stem cell therapy - my understanding is that it's use is far more common on your side of the pond than it is in the US (due to US government restrictions).

Wyler
25th Jan 2018, 09:31
I've had both hips done years ago and it is a new lease of life. No issues and back to long walks up hill and down dale.
Looking at the original question, I was convinced I had muscle problems when the first hip started playing up. It just seemed more 'electrical' than 'mechanical'. When the GP said arthritis I did not believe him.
However, diagnosis confirmed by X-Ray.
When I had it done a few months later my surgeon said it was completely knackered.

RatherBeFlying
25th Jan 2018, 16:28
This is an excellent book that offers several different exercises and stretches to mobilize your joints.

And yes, chiropractors can recommend exercises for specific joint problems.

It is a serious mistake to limit activity if a joint plays up. Gentle exercise is the key.

Use it or lose it!

Effluent Man
25th Jan 2018, 16:59
Absolutely agree. Walk, cycle, swim. Not jog, tennis or squash. I know several relatively young ex squash players with totally knackered joints.

G-CPTN
25th Jan 2018, 21:16
My mother had both hips replaced in the early 1960s when she was in her early 50s by John Charnley at Wrightington hospital (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Charnley#Wrightington_and_hip_implant).
They lasted her until her death in 1988.

oxenos
25th Jan 2018, 21:35
Symptoms of hip wear??

Read the title and assumed it would be a discussion of fashionable clothing, as in zoot suits or cool threads.

pax britanica
26th Jan 2018, 10:38
Wife had severe joint problems following fall-ankles and knees.
lot of soft tissue damage but after nearly three year of trying to sort things out a new GP says perhaps the injuries affected how your walk and that casues problems up both legs and into back.

She is sent to a 'clinical podiatrist' which on the surface looked like another NHS 'we have done something nice and cheap' cop out but he was absolutely excellent and eye opening about how simple things like your shoes may have been fine before the accident but no more. Forced to wear more protective and betetr shaped shoes much of the problems have gone away so to my mind some of these non invasive techniques can be really helpful. He reckoned every step she took damage ligaments around ankle joint and also knees , she wont ever get 100% better but she has seen a massive improvement over a year.

dogsridewith
26th Jan 2018, 13:13
I have seen a consultant and he says my hip is worn...but he considers I wait till it gets much worse before I consider surgery.

I'm happy with that idea.

But...just wondering if my symptoms do reflect a worn out hip joint.

Almost feels like its a muscle prob to me.

If I rest my leg outstretched on a coffee table for instance which is what I like to do watching TV....when I want to lift my leg to move it, its as if the muscle in my leg has gone to sleep me not being able to lift it unless I start it going by lifting with my hand.

Does this sound like its connected to a worn out hip joint.

Lack of mobility is the main prob I have not pain.
The human design doesn't make much power available for that particular motion. You are trying not to scratch the coffee table. Protect it with something. Then try lifting the knee and pulling the foot back a little before the lift. Maybe sort of an over-center linkage angle problem if your knee joint is flexed past straight?


You might try some mild exercise routine that works this lift motion to see if the ability improves. Maybe laying out flat, as well as sitting. Knees at different flexure. Not too much. (I'm not MD or in any way credentialed to give any medical advice.)

Clare Prop
26th Jan 2018, 16:07
I was doing competitive karate and developed what was known as "snapping hip". I was diagnosed with trochanteric bursitis then iliotibial band syndrome and having loads of cortisone injections and physio. Nothing worked. I was then referred to a sports doctor who as I limped into his surgery looked up and said "you have very little cartilage in your hip joint and will need a total hip replacement in two years time" just from the way I limped. He sent me off for an MRI and was absolutely correct. I only had 10% of the cartilage left and the snapping was the pain of bone on bone. I had to give up karate but kept swimming rowing and cycling and It was two years to the day I had a total hip replacement at the age of 50 and I am now back At the dojo.

Point iis other Drs had completely misdiagnosed me because they didn't think someone in their 40s could have that much damage until I saw one who knew exactly what he was looking for. Get an MRI if you doubt the diagnosis and if you need a new hip then you will save a lot of pain and walking funny which will cause problems with your other joints. Good luck!

clareprop
26th Jan 2018, 16:16
Get an MRI if you doubt the diagnosis and if you need a new hip then you will save a lot of pain and walking funny which will cause problems with your other joints.

I'm with my namesake on this ;)
Too often the doc's say 'Let's just wait until it gets worse'. The problem with that is the body is very clever at redistributing everything and you start damaging other parts - as well as shoveling drugs down your mouth.
I had a damaged top vertebra ( C3/4) and lived with it for five years. The result of the operation I eventually had was fantastic - no pain but I've been left with a stoop in my neck because it was delayed for so long.

Pontius Navigator
26th Jan 2018, 19:04
Absolutely agree. Walk, cycle, swim. Not jog, tennis or squash. I know several relatively young ex squash players with totally knackered joints.

On swimming, my chiropractor recommended against breast stroke, especially head out of water style. I found the convex back shape was painful, more so in salt water because of increased buoyancy. Crawl or back was less stressful.

Lonewolf_50
26th Jan 2018, 20:10
Ask your doctor about a hip resurfacing. (crude analogy "coating the ball and socket with something")
Have friend in his 70's who did that. Much less traumatic than hip replacement, if you are eligible, and the rehab to "back to normal" time is about a third.

cavuman1
26th Jan 2018, 22:12
In 1979 I was a resident of Paradise! (St. Simons Island, Georgia, U.S.A.) I had made enough money in the real estate business to retire at the age of 30. I had a 47' Bertram with tuna tower, a Cessna 152 Aerobat, an Oldsmobile 98 Regency, a Cadillac Coupe de Ville, an Audi 100LS, and a five bedroom three bath home fronting the Atlantic Ocean. More importantly, I had my loving high school sweetheart wife, an adoring nine-year-old son who had just won a Duke University Exceptional Scholar award, and a child (daughter) on the way. I had a full head of blond hair, sparkling powder blue eyes, and a high I.Q. I was tanned, rested and ready - for ANYTHING! Life was good - la dolce vita...

President Lyndon Baines Johnson had erected a seawall around the southern end of the island after a very destructive hurricane, Dora, had wrought considerable damage across the island in 1964. This bulwark was comprised of automobile-sized interlocking granite boulders and rose to a height of about 20 feet. Our home's front yard had sturdy wooden set of stairs which traversed this obstacle, which we and a cornucopia of "tourons" (tourist + moron = touron) utilized to get to and from the glorious, wide, shell-laden white sand beach.

One halcyon afternoon, I had fixed myself a perfect martini: a 2 oz. jigger of Stolichnaya, one of Bombay Sapphire, one drop of Chivas Regal, and a bottle of fine vermouth flown at high altitude over the concoction. After a careful shaking in ice chips of this ambrosia so as not to bruise or embarrass it and the addition of a giant green olive, I struck off toward the beach, martini in hand, and faithful Siberian Husky companion, Rasputin XXIII, by my side.

Raz, who I am certain was half mountain goat, spotted a crowd of tourons traversing the stairs and decided to avoid them and leap up and over Johnson's boulders with a coordinated alacrity that might have made Julie Andrews and her goat herd marionette show blush with abject jealousy. I thought to myself "great idea!", took a running start, and began my vertical ascent with the care and speed necessary to climb to the summit. Strides similar, in an horizontal orientation, to cross slippery algae-frosted foot stones in a fast-running stream. One slip in the continuity of fluid motion and one is wet at the best and drowned at the worst.

I made it to the wall's topmost where my forward progress came to an abrupt halt as I stepped into a gopher-sized hole and was promptly thrown sideways. My right hip impacted the sharp point of one of those damned boulders. A bolt of lightning pain shot up and down my body and exploded inside my being. I was paralyzed. I lay in exquisite suffering for nearly an half hour. Only good ol' Raz and his cold, curious, probing nose brought me back across the Styx, and, eventually, the rock wall. The tourons paid no attention whatsoever.

Good News/Bad News, Bad News first: the fall set up an inflammatory autoimmune reaction leading to a pronounced osteoarthritis of my right hip. My orthopedic surgeon told me to "take the pain as long as you can" prior to any surgical intervention. That hip hurts me continuously, as it does as I type this; as it has for 39 years. I limp and moan and groan and my young bride, two decades my junior, offers solace in the form of jocularity and hugs. I cannot seek surgical rememedy, however: I have COPD which precludes elective procedures due to fear of anesthetic apnea. I don't want to take a dirt nap quite yet.

The good news is: I didn't spill a single drop of that martini! (And Raz didn't even try for a sip.) Huskies must be teetotalers... ;)

And 'tis a wonder and a gift that I can still prepare a fine martini! :E

- Ed :O

dogsridewith
27th Jan 2018, 00:13
"...the fall set up an inflammatory autoimmune reaction leading to a pronounced osteoarthritis of my right hip."

cavuman1: Have you had the blood test for RA Factor? Any other joints in the body start to have problems after this hip injury?

The reason I ask is that Rheumatioid Arthritis is an autoimmune condition w/o clear understanding of why it occurs. One amongst many suggested causes is acute joint trauma.

(One of my dogs would leap effluvial rock ridges w/ no possible view of a landing.)

cavuman1
27th Jan 2018, 00:46
Dear Dogsridewith,

I appreciate your concern and question. I have no other arthroses, the right hip seems to be the only affected joint. I do suffer from DePuytren's Contracture of my (non-dominant) right hand and have tested negative for RA factor over the years. I have a check-up scheduled for early April and will get my quack, who is a very skilled physician and super nice gentleman, to test again. I have been taking 600 mg. ibuprofen at bedtime - difficult to sleep on my right side - but have discontinued that medication due to exfoliative dermatitis on my cheeks and forehead.

Love a dog who takes a leap of faith! Have you ever seen the "art work" depicting poker playing dogs? Yours, no doubt, was the pup who always drew to inside straights and hit 'em every time...

- Ed

Kerosene Kraut
27th Jan 2018, 18:25
If you need a hip replacement it will feel more and more painful the more your hip wears out. Unfortunately there doesn't seem to be a way around. The longer the wait the more painful or similar.
My mother just had her second hip replaced. The second one came by "micro invasive surgery" and needed only minor cuts and whatever. She recovered way faster than with No.1 hip back then, done the traditional style.

Afterwards she says it was worth it. She couldn't move in the house because her pains got more and more serious before. Now she is back to business and does walks to train her body. Planning some Bavaria alps vacation this summer. (walking not climbing but still). There is some real important reha-training phase with some expert after the surgery. You learn how to move and do specific maneuvers, like entering your car and such. (like putting a plastic bag on the drivers seat to make you glide over it more easily) Plus you can now avoid the "banked attitude" you got used to before.

All the best to your health and get well soon.