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Flash2001
23rd Jan 2018, 18:38
All

I think I remember that the late, great C N Parkinson postulated that the most efficient size for a nation (democracy?) was about 20 million or so. If any of the erudite posters on JB can direct me to the article, paper, or whatever, I would be most grateful.

Flash

After an excellent landing etc...

ORAC
23rd Jan 2018, 18:48
Well Rousseau thought the ideal size was a nation about the size of Corsica.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constitutional_Project_for_Corsica

Lonewolf_50
23rd Jan 2018, 18:50
I'd suggest you head to Hollywood and see a cosmetic surgeon.
Oh, wait, I thought you said mammary assistance. :E
Sorry, carry on. (This text to voice feature from Windows has its shortfalls ...)

Pontius Navigator
23rd Jan 2018, 21:20
This doesn't answer the OP but is diverting never the less

Parkinson's Law | The Economist (http://www.economist.com/node/14116121)

Trossie
23rd Jan 2018, 21:32
Well Rousseau thought the ideal size was a nation about the size of Corsica.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constitutional_Project_for_CorsicaAnd a Corsican once thought that the ideal size of a nation was Europe. Fortunately the Brits were there to put a stop to his foolish ideas. (Europe has had to rely on the Brits to stop people with such foolish ideas so frequently in history; maybe history will show that having happened yet again now?)

vapilot2004
24th Jan 2018, 02:57
Parkinson's book, "East and West" may be the source as it focuses on nations, relations and their history.

ExXB
24th Jan 2018, 12:56
Switzerland’s direct democracy, has just over 8 million residents. But only 80% (Swiss nationals) get to vote, and half of those can’t be bothered.

sitigeltfel
24th Jan 2018, 13:29
Well Rousseau thought the ideal size was a nation about the size of Corsica.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constitutional_Project_for_Corsica

Corsica, being mostly mountainous, is largely uninhabitable.

cavortingcheetah
25th Jan 2018, 00:30
Actually, the little Corsican emperor, the antithetical Napoleon, was stopped, not by the British at all, for they were rapidly losing their Wellingtons at Waterloo, but rather by the arrival of the jolly old Germans in the form of a Prussian army of fifty thousand men who arrived on the scene at tea time.
In total, some 45% of the men supporting the Sepoy General were German speakers. Waterloo was a German victory with the British troops providing a useful supporting role.