PDA

View Full Version : Acid sales banned for under-18s


ShotOne
7th Jan 2018, 22:33
WTF? What was the case for permitting youngsters to buy acid previously?

Mechta
7th Jan 2018, 23:21
A sixteen year old mail ordering a new battery for their moped would get supplied with the electrolyte pack to add to the battery. That electrolyte pack is largely sulphuric acid.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Battery-12v-4Ah-YB4L-B-Honda-Mini-Melody-YB4LB-YTX4L-BS-Peugeot-Speedfight-YTZ5S/192389739724?hash=item2ccb5274cc:g:mFAAAOSwRZRZcfYD

MG23
7th Jan 2018, 23:22
That we used to be able to trust kids not to throw it in people's faces?

I remember doing chemistry experiments at home when I was a kid, there was probably acid in there, though I doubt it was as concentrated as what we used at school. That would presumably get me arrested as a 'potential terrorist' these days.

Just another example of the British government's long tradition of punishing the decent people because they're unwilling or unable to deal with the scumbags.

meadowrun
7th Jan 2018, 23:36
Bangs forehead gently on keyboard...... Any kids you know who know any 19 year old kids?

Tankertrashnav
7th Jan 2018, 23:48
More to the point - more stop and search, and sod the protesters. An automatic jail sentence for anyone carrying acid in public, unless packaged for transit and accompanied by a shop receipt dated the day of purchase. The bloke who got 10 years for that night club attack a while back was 29 as I recall - the new law wouldnt have stopped him.

419
8th Jan 2018, 01:07
Acid sales banned for under-18s

The title is incorrect.
There isn't a ban on under 18's buying acids or other corrosive substances, simply a voluntary plan for retailers put out by the government.

The big retailers will be enforcing this ban but what about the small corner shops, hardware shops, ebay sellers etc?
I doubt very much if all of them will turn customers away who look under 18 if they are ready to pay cash for their purchases.

The government should have introduced a full ban the same as they do for alcohol, knives etc. I know that there are still plenty of places that do sell these items to under 18's but if caught doing so, they can and often are prosecuted.

maggot
8th Jan 2018, 01:30
Gees

A 16 to sold me acid for my pool the other day

Fark'n'ell
8th Jan 2018, 03:52
A 16 to sold me acid for my pool the other day

You sure it was an acid?

Effluent Man
8th Jan 2018, 08:30
Generation thing I suppose. I thought this thread was about LSD.

VP959
8th Jan 2018, 08:38
WTF? What was the case for permitting youngsters to buy acid previously?

Anyone can go into a builders merchant or one of the DIY sheds and buy a 5 litre container of hydrochloric acid off the shelf. I bought a couple from one of the DIY sheds only a few weeks ago. It's sold as brick cleaner.

As already pointed out, lead acid batteries are often sold with the sulphuric acid in a separate bottle, to be added just before the battery is fitted.

TBH, even if this was a ban on under 18s buying corrosive substances (bearing in mind that it's not just acid, but a very wide range of household substances that could be used in attacks, with the same sort of result) then it would be pointless. There was a ban on selling cigarettes to under 16's when I was a kid. Didn't stop me from becoming a regular smoker from the age of 14.

If under 18s want to get hold of corrosive substances to attack people they will - either they will ask a mate who's over 18 to buy it, or, more likely, they will just steal it.

Sallyann1234
8th Jan 2018, 09:37
Is the ban only on acids? Strong alkalis are just as harmful.

meadowrun
8th Jan 2018, 09:42
It's reactionary, ineffective, not even half measures.
Like covering Britain's city streets with bollards.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41LxioV0DIL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

Tankertrashnav
8th Jan 2018, 10:16
Precisely meadowrun. Our kitchen has a number of lethal knives in the drawer, and our sink has a cupboard with several products like the one you illustrate. All entirely legal but if I took them out on the street Id expect to be prosecuted for having them in public. That's where the action should be taken, but as soon as "stop and search" is mentioned, the race card gets played and the idea is shelved again.

Pinky the pilot
8th Jan 2018, 10:53
Generation thing I suppose. I thought this thread was about LSD

Must admit that was my initial reaction as well, to reading the thread title.:E

A slight digression;

In 1982 I was working on a Seismic Survey Crew in the South Aussie Outback. All the Seismic lines had a three letter identification, starting with the letter L.

When they finally got around to surveying, dozing and eventually shooting line LSD, just about everyone on the Crew called it 'Acid line.':E:D

maggot
8th Jan 2018, 11:03
You sure it was an acid?

Well, it does say hydroclauric acid on the side and it adjusts the pH about right so I'm assuming that yes, it is acid.
Am I missing something?

VP959
8th Jan 2018, 11:13
Well, it does say hydroclauric acid on the side and it adjusts the pH about right so I'm assuming that yes, it is acid.
Am I missing something?

Sounds right, You usually use hydrochloric acid to bring the pH back down after adding calcium hypochlorite to chlorinate the pool. The calcium hypochlorite increases the pool pH, which then prevents chlorine from being dissolved in the water, so you add hydrochloric acid to bring the pH down and release more free chlorine to disinfect the pool properly.

I have to do the same to my borehole well every time I do anything that might introduce contamination, like pull the pipe and pump out. I use the same stuff, pool shock granules and hydrochloric acid, mixed in a bucket with water until the pH is right then chucked down the well and pumped around a bit, then flushed clear.

skydiver69
8th Jan 2018, 17:38
What does this voluntary ban do to stop the majority of attacks which were carried out by over 18 year olds such as Arthur Collins or Katie Leong?

I've seen the aftermath of an acid attack first hand and it is a horrible thing to have seen. Given that background I find the government's response to be half hearted and on the face of it very ineffective.

MG23
8th Jan 2018, 18:06
What does this voluntary ban do to stop the majority of attacks which were carried out by over 18 year olds such as Arthur Collins or Katie Leong?

Nothing.

It's the typical knee-jerk 'do something' measure that we've come to know and love from the British government.

artschool
8th Jan 2018, 18:41
I think that it is sad that parliament actually think this law will make one jot of difference.

deluded also comes to mind.

Gertrude the Wombat
8th Jan 2018, 19:13
WTF? What was the case for permitting youngsters to buy acid previously?
I bought acids, and various other interesting chemicals, routinely as a "youngster" - we actually did stuff in those days, like playing with chemistry sets, rather than just staring at a phone all day.

OK so we were mostly making fireworks and various other explosives, but all good clean (well, quite dirty on occasion actually) fun.

sitigeltfel
8th Jan 2018, 19:27
Boy admits London acid attacks on moped riders - BBC News (http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-london-42611019)

This is he...

https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/8255942b98d4b149a74e91da44d7ea4193b47cf38a79dad0cdc83ed53f98 29f8.jpg?w=600&h=438

tomahawk_pa38
9th Jan 2018, 14:30
So they're going to ban acids - the stuff I use to clean my oven is alkali (Caustic soda) - wouldn't want that in my face either and you can buy a big jar for just over a pound.

VP959
9th Jan 2018, 15:32
All this stupid knee-jerk type rule making does is create hassle for lots and lots of people, it does nothing at all to prevent the sort of crimes these bastards commit - they will get hold of the stuff they want without any hassle any way, they probably just steal it.

Here's another example. For years I've kept a few litres of toluene in a metal cupboard in my workshop. It's probably the best solvent going for degreasing and many other heavy-duty tasks. I used to be able to just buy 5 litre cans whenever I wanted to. Just before Christmas I noticed I was running low and went to buy a new can. Apparently this is now a restricted substance and cannot be sold to private individuals. What did I do? I went down to the place that makes agricultural trailers just down the road (I know the bloke there pretty well) with an empty can and asked if he's sell me a can full of toluene. No problem at all, 5 lighter I walked out with my can topped up from his 50 litre drum of the stuff. That was cheaper than me buying 5 litres from my normal supplier...................

KenV
9th Jan 2018, 15:40
Drano (brand name for a very common drain cleaner here in the US) contains high levels of lye (sodium/potassium hydroxide) which is very effective at dissolving animal tissue and is not an acid. Anyone, including youth, can buy it

This legislation is yet another of the many feel-good laws politicians pass to make themselves (and some of their constituents) feel like they're "doing something" when in reality the law is totally ineffective and ends up doing more harm than good.

skydiver69
9th Jan 2018, 19:17
This legislation is yet another of the many feel-good laws politicians pass to make themselves (and some of their constituents) feel like they're "doing something" when in reality the law is totally ineffective and ends up doing more harm than good.

Another piece of pointless legislation is the attempt to restrict the sale of 'zombie knives' following a successful lobbying campaign by a single Police and Crime Commissioner. The trouble is this legislation won't have any effect on knife crime as knives of every sort are really easy to get hold of, so in every possible way the new legislation was completely pointless.

funfly
10th Jan 2018, 09:02
Surely the point is that the weapon of choice will be anything they can get their hands on, if not a purchased acid product then something else

sitigeltfel
10th Jan 2018, 18:37
Another piece of pointless legislation is the attempt to restrict the sale of 'zombie knives' following a successful lobbying campaign by a single Police and Crime Commissioner. The trouble is this legislation won't have any effect on knife crime as knives of every sort are really easy to get hold of, so in every possible way the new legislation was completely pointless.

A man was shot outside a chicken shop in Stockwell, London, last night. Weapons legislation means nothing to them.

It is so prevalent that the BBC gives incidents like this little or no cover. Maybe they chose not to in order to avoid upsetting "community cohesion".

Tech Guy
11th Jan 2018, 11:43
Another piece of pointless legislation is the attempt to restrict the sale of 'zombie knives' following a successful lobbying campaign by a single Police and Crime Commissioner. The trouble is this legislation won't have any effect on knife crime as knives of every sort are really easy to get hold of, so in every possible way the new legislation was completely pointless.

Yes, green handled "zombie knives" are now outlawed.
However, red handled "vampire knives" are still perfectly legal. As are garden machetes and the scrotes favourite "kitchen devil".

Our current laws are perfectly good enough. They just need to be enforced rigorously and transgression should be dealt with by something more substantial than an ASBO.

Gertrude the Wombat
11th Jan 2018, 13:08
As are garden machetes
My lad has one. But he doesn't walk down the streets of Manchester swinging it as he did as perfectly normal practice in Jamaica (when getting from one bit of the farm to another).