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magpienja
6th Jan 2018, 17:30
Hi guys...I drive a large heavy industrial 32ton bin type truck with auto transmission...(changes gear unexpectedly)

Been doing this work for many years...I dont often come into contact with horses and riders but over the years and a few days ago I have found my self in a scary situations where I was not quite sure not being a rider myself what to do.

Would love to hear a rider view of how they would like me to pass.

All the hi-way code say approach slowly...be prepared to stop.

A few days ago I was driving down an A road thats not busy but quite wide for a single carriageway type road.

Unrestricted speed limit but I was only driving about 30mph as I had only just joined the road.

I noticed about 100mts away on the other side of the road riding on the pavement going same direction as me so with there backs to me 2 young girls with horses...the one on front was riding the other leading her horse.

As I got nearer...75mts I started to slow down...I notice the lead horse twitching a bit I thought I need to watch out here aware on the noise my truck makes...

The nearer I got the worse the horse was...I was gently slowing as I got nearer...just before I came alongside now doing around 10mph the horse started to rear up...then moving backwards onto the road...in my mirror I could see the other girl had left her horse and was running up the road toward the other horse...

I considered stopping but also thought this may make matters worse...so I kept going being ready to stop if the hours got anywhere near the truck.

As I passed in my mirror I saw the horse settle.

As I drove on I was thinking what would the best way to pass them would have been...and did my slowing down to much make matters worse...would I have been better keeping a steady slightly faster speed up????

I found it quite unnerving...as no doubt the young rider did.

dogsridewith
6th Jan 2018, 18:54
Wouldn't want to pass that rearing-up horse w/ much speed because it might get loose at just the wrong time and run into the front or side of your motor vehicle.
I think I'd punch the hazard lights while braking to a full stop, or slow down enough to maintain substantial following distance. Then wait for gestures from riders to proceed.


Not a horse rider/driver perspective. Rather an operator of various types of motor and pedal vehicles (some w/ a dog or two towing) on roads with many Amish buggies and some Amish ("Dutch") or "English" riding on saddle or bareback.

G-CPTN
6th Jan 2018, 19:04
I would have peeped the horn as soon as you saw the horses and riders (with their backs to you) and be prepared to stop (as, you were).
Mature riders would have signalled to you to pass when they were 'in control' - though it seems that these youngsters were not fully in control.

Under the circumstances you seem to have dealt with the situation to the best of your ability.

treadigraph
6th Jan 2018, 19:27
I often encounter horse riders while out cycling; I find slow, quiet and cautious works perfectly and gets a smile and a wave - the rider is often quite grateful too. :)

Years ago I was taking part in a charity bike ride. On a leafy lane somewhere north of Fairoaks, a riderless horse galloped towards us - he slowed down as he approached us and then stopped in a gated field entrance. I leaned my bike against tree and moved slowly towards him, making soothing noises and he visibly calmed down. I was going to take the reins and hitch him to the gate. Before I could, the unseated rider came blundering up the road, a large red faced bloke, panting, sweating, waving his arms and swearing - the horse looked at the :mad:wit and quite naturally scarpered...

ZeBedie
6th Jan 2018, 20:25
You sound like a good driver magpienja.

If you think having a horse rear up at you whilst you're in a lorry is bad, I can assure you that when you're on a bike and that happens, it's not nice at all.

Gertrude the Wombat
6th Jan 2018, 20:26
Once Upon A Time an instructor gave me a PFL, and it was only as I put on full throttle to climb away that I realised that the field I'd chosen belonged to the local stables where my wife would from time to time rent horses.

So I got her to enquire of the owner whether it upset the horses having aircraft approach silently and then suddenly go to full throttle just over their heads.

"Nah, doesn't bother them at all, happens all the time, they've got used to it long since" was the reply.

G-CPTN
6th Jan 2018, 20:43
There was a time when low-flying Chinooks were know to have spooked horses.
A 'code of practice' was adopted to minimise extremely low flying in areas where there were known to be horses.

Tankertrashnav
6th Jan 2018, 22:40
Agreed that you seem to have behaved considerately and handled the situation well Magpienja

The thread takes me back to the time when I was commuting from Newmarket to Stradishall when I was going through nav school. I frequently passed strings of racehorses on the road being taken out to the gallops in the mornings, and I learned then that thoroughbred racehorses are remarkably stupid animals. They seemed to spend most of their time going sideways and rearing up, with these tiny blokes in the saddle evidently barely in control I used to live in fear of one of these highly strung but extremely expensive animals colliding with my car. I figured that in Newmarket, where the horse rules, even if I was stationary, handbrake on and in neutral I'd still get the blame!

PLovett
6th Jan 2018, 22:52
Having owned horses and ridden them for many years there is no single answer that can suffice but be aware that anything can happen. They have survived on a fright and flight trigger. They don't wait around to work out what is happening before they take to their heels. Horses also have very good nearly all-round vision (except their 6 o'clock but by tilting their head slightly they can include that) so they are very aware of what is happening around them. However, depth perception is somewhat lacking.

Normally if they can see something they won't get upset, what can set them off is strong contrast. For example, a very strong shadow across a road and they can hesitate to cross from light to dark, other things that can upset them is a flapping cover over a load on a truck. I was riding a mare along the wide verge of a highway when a truck went past with a plastic sheet flapping, that did produce an interesting reaction.

A horse being ridden will respond to the rider's behaviour. Horses communicate by body language and if a rider is getting worried by something then the horse will pick up on the inevitable body language of the rider and get worried also.

Horses are also herd animals, in the paddock there is a hierarchy at work from alpha mare on down to the bottom most rung. Humans need to understand that and be the alpha or the horse will disrespect them. Now, most riders, and especially young females, are appalling when it comes to horses. They are soppy about them and think that because they bring the horse treats then their horse will love them deeply. Absolute equine rear-end product.

The horse that started rearing may not have been reacting to the truck at all but something on the side of the road, for example, I used to ride a mare that spooked at dogs who would come out at her barking. We cured that by galloping at the dogs. She quickly learnt. The best advice is to approach any horse on the road cautiously, don't suddenly flash your headlights or sound horns, avoid air brakes and give as wide a berth as possible. Just be aware that a horse can develop 2.5 tonnes per square inch of power with their rear hooves.

fltlt
6th Jan 2018, 23:38
I am not a horse rider, however a very good friend of mine used to be the Gunny in charge of the Marine Corps Mounted Color Guard.
Their horses all come from the wild horse roundup, so not exactly a stable (pun) group.
These horses are in all manner of parades, in front of, behind, alongside of any number and manner of loud noises, visual distractions, yet rarely react.
I found this part quite interesting, on a guided tour of their stables after a rodeo held there, it sounded as if we had literally walked into WW III, the sound of machineguns, bombs going off, engines revving, and all manner of loud noises piped directly into the stables.
The horses just stood around, completely ignoring the din. It was explained that this is how they train the horses to not react to anything they may encounter on the parade routes.
Not suggesting everyone should do this, however I found it fascinating.

aerobelly
7th Jan 2018, 00:37
You sound like a good driver magpienja.

If you think having a horse rear up at you whilst you're in a lorry is bad, I can assure you that when you're on a bike and that happens, it's not nice at all.

Absolutely! Two horses were spooked by an idiot with a shotgun as I rode past (slowly and talking to the riders, apparently it helps persuade the horse that you are a human). When the world came to a halt I was upside down in a ditch, still firmly attached to the bike. The two riders' language used to the shotgunner was most unladylike.

TTN: a Range Rover or large Mercedes-Benz doesn't bother the current generation of misshaped camels, those are what the head trainers drive so they are used to them. A bicycle is considered a horse eater that hasn't fed for weeks, slavering at the jaws.


'a

radeng
7th Jan 2018, 10:16
My worst experience was driving up the A429 north of Northleach in Gloucestershire when over the hedge at the side of the road came a damn great horse ridden by a hunts man in a red coat. He JUST managed to pull the horse up on the verge before I hit them both - I hadn't a hope in hell of stopping in the short distance involved.

Mallan
7th Jan 2018, 11:08
Many experiences over the years as a horse rider. Leading my horse a paint called Mallan back to his field on the main road from the stables, as I got to the gate a bin lorry came by and one of its tyres burst. Next thing I know is that I'm laying the other side of the gate holding the lead rope and Mallan is looking at me over the gate with a "What the F*$k is wrong with you" another time a bird flying out of the hedge and he throws double six. Horses like most animals are very unpredictable.

Blues&twos
7th Jan 2018, 13:03
My daughter was learning to ride and had a 'regular' horse. They got on well until one winter, during which the horse became wary of her and very skittish when she was riding him. After a while we figured out he didn't like the rustling sound her new coat was making. Changed coats, immediately back to normal!

pulse1
7th Jan 2018, 14:14
The way a horse reacts to external stimuli is much to do with the human in charge than with anything else. My daughter helps people deal with stress and anxiety and sometimes uses horses as an aid. She once gave me a go and, although I do not really like horses, I found the experience totally fascinating.

I had to go into an arena with this huge horse and, without saying a word, I had to get the horse to follow me wherever I went. Eventually I worked out what it was within myself that made the horse respond and then spent an amazing few minutes walking around in the arena, this massive animal following me with his head right up against my shoulder. I twisted and turned, reversed direction, and it followed every step. It was one of life's amazing experiences.

M.Mouse
7th Jan 2018, 16:25
How did you do that pulse1? I like horses but they make me nervous with their unpredictability.

pulse1
7th Jan 2018, 17:14
MM. Because horses have many natural predators they are very sensitive to body language and energy. In order to get their co-operation therefore you have to adopt a completely non threatening posture and mental attitude. My wife tried the same thing and, initially, the horse followed her quite well but suddenly left her and walked over to the fence. When asked what she was thinking at that moment, she confessed that she had started to think more negatively.

My daughter had a client whose business and family life were failing. When he entered the arena, he started shouting at the horse, trying to get it to cooperate. The horse just kept running off. Eventually this guy got the message that his main problem in life was that he was too controlling. He didn't trust his staff and he didn't trust his family. He calmed down, took a more relaxed view of life and , immediately, the horse started to trust him. I understand that everything in his life is now going much better.

I believe that dogs are also very sensitive to body language and energy in determining their place within the pack (family).

Blues&twos
7th Jan 2018, 17:43
Cats are sensitive to body language too.
If you're holding food, they like you.
Everything else, they ignore you.

alicopter
7th Jan 2018, 18:40
Hi. @pulse1 What you describe is known as "follow up" in "horse whispering"... it is easy, every body can do it, with the most fierce or the daftest horse... it comes after the "join up" and is just adopting, speaking horse language... they all understand it. As a lifelong horse rider, breeder, whisperer, dealing with "problem horses", having trekked thousand of miles with horses, mules or donkeys all over Europe, I have seen many "delicate situations" and I can say that, all of the times, the problem is with the rider and NEVER with the equine... like flying, it is more a question of "feeling" and "anticipating"... if the animal trusts you, there is no limit to what you can do together. I longe my horses without a longe (on a perfect cercle, in an open field, on all allures and changing hands)... ride without bits or saddle and can walk for miles with my friends behind without anything between us but trust and love...... the only time I have been in trouble was five years ago when Justin, my donkey, fully harnessed with 65 kgs of gear in the cross trees broke that strong and endless Love between us for the love of an old donkey lady in a field on the other side of the Route Nationale we were travelling on. He betrayed me for the beautiful eyes of this horny lady. The Gendarmerie and five strong gendarmes intervened after having called them to the rescue and we took him Manu Military to a by road were he could mend his broken heart... the time for me to get a lift to the nearest town to buy a quite severe bit that he would chew on in dangerous spots like roads or town centres when shopping..... just in case Cupidon striked again.

Chronus
7th Jan 2018, 18:45
I wish Krystal N Chips was on this thread, I am sure he would enjoy it greatly. He does not like negative vibes also.
My question is, why is it that the female gender of the human species are so keen on horses. Every time I am stuck behind a horse box, behind the wheel sits inveriably a female driver.

Tankertrashnav
7th Jan 2018, 23:52
why is it that the female gender of the human species are so keen on horses.

I might just mention tight riding breeches and leather saddles and leave you to join up the dots Chronus ;)

Ascend Charlie
8th Jan 2018, 03:10
Race horses is just stoopid people. Piece of paper, jockey farts, they go berserk. They are only trained to do one thing, run in the same direction as the rest of the mob.

Get a polo pony. They are not scared by running head-on at another nag, or getting a wallop from a mallet, or even being overflown by the boss's helicopter.

Carry0nLuggage
8th Jan 2018, 09:28
I might just mention tight riding breeches and leather saddles and leave you to join up the dots Chronus ;)

Is anyone else getting an ad illustrating just this fashion at the endo of the posts? :E

treadigraph
8th Jan 2018, 09:31
I'm getting one for hoof trimming - my toe nails aren't that bad!

UpaCreak
8th Jan 2018, 09:33
I'm getting one for "Attractive Sights", but unfortunately is for castles in Germany

ShyTorque
8th Jan 2018, 09:52
The advice given to classic triallers (two and four wheeled motor vehicles) when encountering horses is to be prepared to stop and switch off the engine. They are indeed silly creatures - I still have a damaged neck to remind me of the fact. I was thrown and trampled on by a spooked pony almost fifty years ago, in my teens.

Motor vehicles are much easier - you can switch the engine off and put the brakes on. Horses are more "fly by wire".

cargosales
8th Jan 2018, 11:19
I am not a horse rider, however a very good friend of mine used to be the Gunny in charge of the Marine Corps Mounted Color Guard.
Their horses all come from the wild horse roundup, so not exactly a stable (pun) group.
These horses are in all manner of parades, in front of, behind, alongside of any number and manner of loud noises, visual distractions, yet rarely react.
I found this part quite interesting, on a guided tour of their stables after a rodeo held there, it sounded as if we had literally walked into WW III, the sound of machineguns, bombs going off, engines revving, and all manner of loud noises piped directly into the stables.
The horses just stood around, completely ignoring the din. It was explained that this is how they train the horses to not react to anything they may encounter on the parade routes.
Not suggesting everyone should do this, however I found it fascinating.


I've got nothing to do with horses but do dog training and that's exactly one of the things that we recommend to accustom them to things like fireworks etc

One of the easiest ways is to dust off your old collection of war movies and play them. Repeatedly. Quietly to begin with, building up gradually to LOUD. The missus might not be impressed at the time but the results speak for themselves.

On Bonfire Night, my dog didn't bat an eyelid at all the whooshes, explosions, bangs, crashes and general mayhem... because exactly the same was on the TV inside.

His favourite is Kelly's Heroes, so much so that he insists on watching twice in a row ;)

CS