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ShotOne
1st Jan 2018, 10:15
The ShotOne family trooped into an Edinburgh pub yesterday attracted by a large “Families Welcome” sign. Turns out, as it was pointed out without excessive politeness the sign actually means “Not welcome at all unless you’re ordering full main meals”. No doubt this hinges on a selective reading of licensing laws and that the corrosive effect on children of witnessing alcohol consumption is somehow cancelled if the spend-per-head is high enough

gruntie
1st Jan 2018, 10:56
Many years ago went into a pub in the Surrey Hills one lunchtime with No. 1 son in a sling on my chest: he was probably all of 3 or 4 months old. Was ordered out with the comment ‘no children allowed in the bar’.
I’ve never been back since. Their loss.

Gertrude the Wombat
1st Jan 2018, 11:40
Our local pub was basically a toddlers' tea party from 6pm or so on a Friday night (may still be for all I know, but we don't have toddlers any more). Full of families whose parents were too tired to cook after a week working. An otherwise fairly dead time for an estate pub, and the toddlers had all gone home by the time the serious Friday night drinkers arrived.

One night someone whom I barely knew by sight plonked a baby on my lap and said "can you look after that whilst I eat my dinner". A while later the baby's elder sibling wandered over and asked "can we have our baby back now?" and started getting rather upset when I said "no, I've decided to keep it". Some people just can't take being teased.

That's the way to run a pub. Separate by time or space as needed (no kids in the public in that pub, only the lounge and the garden), but cater for all the punters who want to use it.

Blues&twos
1st Jan 2018, 11:45
My wife and I went into a newly opened restaurant years ago when we lived in south London, on our local High Street. It was a Sunday afternoon, about 2pm and we ordered a cream tea (scones, cream, jam, pot of tea). We were the only customers in there. The waitress came back and told us the manager had said we could only have the cream tea if we first ordered a Sunday lunch - we had already had lunch at home, so we declined. The manager stuck to his demands so we left.
The place was open for probably 5 months before it was taken over, we didn't go back of course. It's odd that some people with the ability and drive to go it on their own and establish a business in the first place don't have the sense to see that they are alienating potential customers.

Gertrude the Wombat
1st Jan 2018, 12:10
My wife and I went into a newly opened restaurant years ago when we lived in south London, on our local High Street. It was a Sunday afternoon, about 2pm and we ordered a cream tea (scones, cream, jam, pot of tea). We were the only customers in there. The waitress came back and told us the manager had said we could only have the cream tea if we first ordered a Sunday lunch - we had already had lunch at home, so we declined. The manager stuck to his demands so we left.
We went into a pub the other day, having nothing else to do, being stuck on the island for an extra day as no planes were flying due to the weather.

We sat around for the morning drinking coffee, then we decided it was lunch time so I wandered up to the bar to ask for the lunch menu. "Not sure if we're doing lunch today" was the response ... she then made a phone call, following which she came over to our table and handed out menus.

We deduced that the pub didn't actually do lunch on Mondays, but the phone call had been to the chef saying "get your arse over here, we've got ten punters in who want lunch".

That's the way to do it.

cargosales
1st Jan 2018, 12:22
Our local (one of several in the village) has a very sensible approach to dogs, families and children:

Reasonably well behaved dogs welcome in all parts of the pub, except on the bit (1/3?) which is carpeted. Hard surfaces - fine, carpets - no. No aggressive or overly noisy dogs please. Simple rules, easily understood and easily adhered to by customers.

Free dog treats are in a tub on the bar and clean! water bowls available on request.


Reasonably well behaved children are very welcome but no charging round screaming inside the pub please - go into the garden to do that! And no children at the bar itself. Again, fair and reasonable and it keeps everyone happy.

Families - there are no rules about having to buy any food at all to bring your family in for a drink.


Guess what ... it's a popular pub :-)

Pontius Navigator
1st Jan 2018, 13:43
Asked about dogs at our new local. " I wish" said mine host. He explained that his lease forbid dogs. 3 miles down the road, dogs welcome.

boguing
1st Jan 2018, 16:30
Many years ago went into a pub in the Surrey Hills one lunchtime with No. 1 son in a sling on my chest: he was probably all of 3 or 4 months old. Was ordered out with the comment ‘no children allowed in the bar’.
I’ve never been back since. Their loss.

The Plough at Coldharbour by any chance? Once internationally renowned for unbelievably rude management it's now in new hands, and totally transformed.

G-CPTN
1st Jan 2018, 17:14
Many years ago went into a pub in the Surrey Hills one lunchtime with No. 1 son in a sling on my chest: he was probably all of 3 or 4 months old. Was ordered out with the comment ‘no children allowed in the bar’.
I’ve never been back since. Their loss.

Many pubs had a strict 'no children in the bar' rule, but would allow youngsters in the lounge (sometimes a back room with no servery).

Pontius Navigator
1st Jan 2018, 19:47
Just outside our school bounds was a pub. We were not allowed in the bar when the pub was open. We were allowed in when it was shut :)

When it was open we had to use the back room.

Gertrude the Wombat
1st Jan 2018, 21:12
Just outside our school bounds was a pub. We were not allowed in the bar when the pub was open. We were allowed in when it was shut :)

When it was open we had to use the back room.
Our local allowed underage lads (and no doubt ladesses if any had wanted to turn up) into the public bar outside licencing hours, to play darts and billiards and drink Coke and eat crisps on the way home from school. We're told they didn't sell them alcohol.

Donkey497
1st Jan 2018, 21:16
@ShotOne

Sorry folks, but the licensing laws are a little arcane up here, and some of the licensing boards like to add their own little twist onto the hoops you have to jump through here. The key thing to remember however is that the Scottish Government's aim is to eliminate the licensed trade in its entirety in their bid to drive out any traces of enjoyment, sociability and hospitality towards visitors and tourists.

Tankertrashnav
2nd Jan 2018, 01:10
The waitress came back and told us the manager had said we could only have the cream tea if we first ordered a Sunday lunch - we had already had lunch at home, so we declined. The manager stuck to his demands so we left.

Had a similar experience in a well known pub near Truro. Sunday lunchtime and Mrs TTN and I dropped in for a drink and took a couple of vacant seats at a table in the bar (not the adjoining restaurant). I went to the bar to order drinks but was told if we weren't ordering lunch we would have to stand at the bar. I told the landlord that I didn't think we were in France, but if the alternatives were order a meal or stand we'd leave.

We left - never been back.

ExSp33db1rd
2nd Jan 2018, 01:46
Yorkshire Dales, late afternoon, stopped at a pub for a drink, and left wife and children outside. Ordered 1 pint, 1 G & T and two Coca Cola's. "Can't take my glasses outside, said the landlord. Not going to, said I, just put straws in the bottles. No, he said, I mean my drink glasses, can't take them outside, lose too many. OK, said I, can I bring the children ( 9 and 11 ) inside. No, he replied, you know you can't bring children into t'pub. Well stuff your booze said I. No problem, he said, and poured beer, G&T and 2 opened Coca Cola's down the sink !

The next village had a pub with a "Childrens Garden" They got my money.

Hydromet
2nd Jan 2018, 01:51
Donkey, interesting that you should say that. One of the friendliest pubs I've ever been in was in Kyleakin, Scotland. Being from the antipodes, I wasn't used to dogs & kids in the public bar and was a bit concerned. However, all were well behaved (as were the grown-ups), the kids enjoyed the earlier part of the folk band, then left. Pleasant, informal meal, friendly staff & clientele and a reasonable band if you like that type of music.

Krystal n chips
2nd Jan 2018, 07:02
@ShotOne

Sorry folks, but the licensing laws are a little arcane up here, and some of the licensing boards like to add their own little twist onto the hoops you have to jump through here. The key thing to remember however is that the Scottish Government's aim is to eliminate the licensed trade in its entirety in their bid to drive out any traces of enjoyment, sociability and hospitality towards visitors and tourists.

I would politely ( ish ) dispute the above, based on a recent ( Nov ) trip to Arrochar, Oban, Callender, Stirling and Inveraray .

No difference at all to the many years of Scottish hospitality I have previously enjoyed anywhere else in the country in fact.

radeng
2nd Jan 2018, 16:19
There's a pub in Wootton Bassett with a sign outside 'Children and dogs welcome if accompanying well behaved parents'

goudie
2nd Jan 2018, 17:08
Went into a pub that was popular with the 'posh types' in Cambridge, many years ago.
I ordered a pint of beer and a Drambuie for Mrs G. The Drambuie came in a wine glass and could hardly be seen, let alone drunk. I asked the landlord if i could have the drink in a proper liqueur glass.
'' Certainly not'' he said in a loud voice, ''you buggers pinch them''! We left!

BizJetJock
2nd Jan 2018, 18:37
One pub near us used to have a sign " dogs are welcome, children must be on a lead at all times". Sadly changed hands now.

ShotOne
2nd Jan 2018, 21:10
I think I’m starting to see why scores of pubs close down every week

cavortingcheetah
2nd Jan 2018, 21:43
A Trip Adviser review.

Pink Puss in Boots.

Perhaps it's not surprising that the large car park was stuffed full of immaculately washed, polished and dusted Range Rovers and Jaguars when we arrived on our second visit for Hampshire is, after all, a paradigm of avaricious agricultural acquisition, where set aside and the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) benefit schemes are well understood. Entry to the restaurant is best achieved by walking around the building into the dinning room itself. Any internal excursion to the place of feasting, or indeed back from thence to the lavatories, requires a navigation through the bar. As the management apparently allows dogs into that area this means that one must steer over or around the furry beasts. It's obvious that this is a bar where canines are regarded as accoutrements, fashion symbols of country living some fifty minutes commute by train from Waterloo. I cannot say whether dogs are allowed into the restaurant itself but I wouldn't have been surprised to see a couple of slavering deer hounds among the wooden tables and chairs. Dog owners seemed oblivious to the fact that an old lady with sticks, not me incidentally but rather one of my guests, might find it difficult to negotiate the recumbent hounds and management did nothing to shoo either of the static species on its way.
Nonetheless, the restaurant is excellent with a wide ranging choice available on the menu, freshly exterminated game in season and a decent enough wine list. Noise from the doggers at the bar can waft it's way into the restaurant if you're sitting in that part of the room near to the drinking counter. Prices would seem to be quite reasonable given the affluence of the area and the staff are delightful and English, this last perhaps being more unusual than it sounds. It's definitely a good place to go for a meal and a drink outside on a fine day.
We didn't get actually there, but at the far end of the car park is what seems to be an outside eating area with its own kitchen. I seem to remember that you can't order food from the restaurant here because the area in question is far enough away to preclude doing this. Perhaps this area would suit a larger group of people? It seemed very popular on the evening occasion when we went to The Boot and we shall certainly give it a whirl next time around, providing that the reasonably warm weather continues to prevail.
Altogether an entertaining place providing good food and drink. I noticed incidentally that, the first time when we went, I had asked for a non alcohol beer only to find they had none. The second time it was available. Of course the restaurant/pub didn't order the stuff in because of me all on my little lonesome-or did it? Good show! Toodle pip!

And to be judiciously balanced, the response.

Thank you for your review of The Boot. Please be assured that there are less than immaculately polished Land Rovers in our car park, one in particular which, if it was jet-washed, would fall to pieces!
We are though, a country pub, and dogs are welcome (but not in the restaurant). I am so sorry that one of them got in your guests way, but the owners are responsible and will move them out of your way if they see a mobility problem.
But glad you enjoyed your meal, and hope to see you again.

Gertrude the Wombat
2nd Jan 2018, 23:02
To the chagrin of the owners it was recovered.
Mate of mine had that problem with a bicycle (he now claims not to remember this story, forty years later, but I do).

He left his bike outside the lab, unlocked, on the grounds that it was a clapped-out old bike and he'd much rather buy a new one with the insurance money.

Sure enough, one day he left work to find the bike gone.

So he walked round the corner to the pub to celebrate ... only to find that the thief had abandoned his bike at the pub. (Whether because the thief was only going to the pub anyway, or because he needed a drink after riding that wreck for a couple of hundred yards, is not known.)

cavortingcheetah
2nd Jan 2018, 23:17
Up by the church, heigh ho and a small world. An excellent idea, far easier to drift down into the road than to lurch into a stormy and wet darkness from the car park exit.

G-CPTN
3rd Jan 2018, 00:24
The main reason why our local pubs 'close' (and are then taken over by 'new' landlords) is that the breweries screw the tenants to the extent that they can no longer make a living wage.
It starts out with the 'brewery'(in this case Punch Taverns) offering introductory terms to get the pub up and running - maybe even financing renovations.
Once the new landlord has established themselves and attracted staff to prepares and serve food and has increased the clientèle, the terms from the brewery change (including paying back for the renovations) and, as stated, the profit margin dwindles and the landlord effectively goes 'bankrupt'.

Even with experienced landlords - a relief landlord that was used to recover and revive pubs that had remained empty for months and with several revivals under his belt, he improved and revived a pub that had become a haunt of degenerates with drug habits and the original landlord was caught cheating by buying his stock from a cash-and-carry to the extent that the relief landlord decided to stay and run the pub as his own, it wasn't long before the brewery wanted 'recompense' for the improvements that he had carried out and financed out of his own pocket, and he just could no longer make ends meet - he left the licensed trade and returned to the army (he had served with special forces so he was no shrinking violet).

Every pub in our village has 'changed hands' several times over the last few years - rarely last longer than a year.

ExSp33db1rd
4th Jan 2018, 04:03
Sure enough, one day he left work to find the bike gone.

"Donated" my old school bike to my University student son, he broke a pedal ( ?? How ?? ) but still used it to free wheel downhill to class after getting up late, and then pushed it home.

One day it was stolen. Who'd steal a one-pedal bike, he moaned. But they did.

Gertrude the Wombat
4th Jan 2018, 12:30
he broke a pedal ( ?? How ?? )
Scenarios can be imagined, but none of the ones I've come up with so far involve being sober at the time.

Mechta
4th Jan 2018, 23:53
"Donated" my old school bike to my University student son, he broke a pedal ( ?? How ?? ) but still used it to free wheel downhill to class after getting up late, and then pushed it home.

One day it was stolen. Who'd steal a one-pedal bike, he moaned. But they did.

Back in the early 1980s, my brother and I hired a couple of bicycles in Jersey. They were of rather obscure East European origin, possibly by 'Pegas' from Rumania? Anyway, having been barred from going into some night club on account of my brother's trainers (I did warn him), we were cycling up the hill out of St Helier, when the crank snapped and the pedal dropped off. It sheared across the hole where the pedal screwed in. Not something I've seen happen before or since.

WingNut60
5th Jan 2018, 03:07
When I was (much) younger, West Oz and at least parts of NZ - no single men in the lounge.

NutLoose
5th Jan 2018, 05:12
Mate in my local having a session of bowling and drinking, ( had a bowling green attached )walked in shirtless on a hot summers day to get the round in, was told he would not be served until he had a shirt on by the manager, went back out put a shirt on walked back in, manager says that's better but cannot understand why the bar is in hysterics, Mate collects the round on a tray then steps back to reveal he is now starkers from the waist down...... oddly enough he got banned LOL.




..

Tankertrashnav
5th Jan 2018, 10:55
Similar thing happened in the "Down Under" bar in the officers' mess at Tengah in 1967. A senior officer informed a group of chaps that they should not still be in shorts after 6 pm. Predictably the whole bunch promptly removed their shorts and carried on drinking in their shreddies.

Groundbased
5th Jan 2018, 13:25
A Trip Adviser review.

Noise from the doggers at the bar can waft it's way into the restaurant if you're sitting in that part of the room near to the drinking counter.

Really?!! Almost a car share moment.

glad rag
5th Jan 2018, 19:20
I would politely ( ish ) dispute the above, based on a recent ( Nov ) trip to Arrochar, Oban, Callender, Stirling and Inveraray .

No difference at all to the many years of Scottish hospitality I have previously enjoyed anywhere else in the country in fact.

What a surprising post. :hmm:

The times they are a changing, and not for the better.

Krystal n chips
6th Jan 2018, 04:48
What a surprising post. :hmm:

The times they are a changing, and not for the better.

I'm bemused as to why you feel my experiences of Scottish hospitality from the past, and more recently, are surprising. Hence another trip later this year is being planned.

In contrast to which, I couldn't say the same about London or the South East of England.

Tankertrashnav
6th Jan 2018, 23:50
Of course you couldnt. It is a fact universally acknowledged that all Southerners are unfriendly selfish snobs and all Northerners and Scots are warm hearted salt of the earth types!

Well isn't it?

goudie
7th Jan 2018, 11:32
I have a cousin who lives in a posh part of Wimbledon. His favorite joke is 'what is the name of the river one has to cross to get to Scotland' ? The river Thames is the correct answer! In his view.

Krystal n chips
7th Jan 2018, 12:31
Of course you couldnt. It is a fact universally acknowledged that all Southerners are unfriendly selfish snobs and all Northerners and Scots are warm hearted salt of the earth types!

Well isn't it?

TTN.....almost true.....there's an exclusion clause for Yorkshire in this respect..:E

goudie
7th Jan 2018, 13:20
Reminds me of the committee discussing how much to spend on a club member's leaving present.
25 suggested one chap 50 said another, no, let's make it 70 said the chairman. Up pipes a Yorkshire man and says, ' you tight sods, round it up to a pound and be done with it'

ShotOne
7th Jan 2018, 14:22
I make no point re warmth of Southerners vs Northerners but it’s only in Scotland my family has been asked to leave a pub.

G-CPTN
7th Jan 2018, 15:06
I make no point re warmth of Southerners vs Northerners but it’s only in Scotland my family has been asked to leave a pub.

and the reason was?

Eclectic
7th Jan 2018, 15:16
Public houses have always been an adult space.
Letting children in has done them far more damage than the smoking ban has.
Pubs are now treated as child playgrounds. The parents can't be bothered to supervise their children and they are saving the cost of a child minder.
Every pub I know that has some form of child ban in force is successful. No surprise there.

ShotOne
7th Jan 2018, 16:14
May I refer you to the opening post, GCPTN

Eclectic, that’ll be why pubs are closing at a rate of 23 a week then?

G-CPTN
7th Jan 2018, 16:22
May I refer you to the opening post, GCPTN

Thanks.
I sympathised with the landlord of our most popular pub/restaurant on Boxing Day when he refused a couple a table as they "only wanted soup and a roll".
He had bookings waiting for tables that extended well into the evening (and probably until closing time).
Normal weekend days are often fully booked until closing.

Gertrude the Wombat
7th Jan 2018, 16:43
that’ll be why pubs are closing at a rate of 23 a week then?
There are all sorts of reasons.

One is that in some places the land values are such that you can make money by closing a busy profitable popular pub and putting a block of flats in its place. I put a stop to that in Cambridge but I expect it's still going on in other places.