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Dan_Brown
25th Dec 2017, 20:51
Now this is really smart.

Help a Hungry Child: NHS doctors to pilot food prescriptions as poverty soars | The Independent (http://www.independent.co.uk/helpahungrychild/doctors-nhs-food-prescriptions-pilot-poverty-soars-a8119221.html)

More Brilliance.

I read that Tesco, Aldi and others are now going to donate leftover food to the needy, instead of binning it. Whoopee!! What I want to know is, why wasn't this carried out decades before??!!! Oh the fear of litigation. B.S, total wanten waste is what has been going on.

When you have seen people dying of starvation at first hand, it is nothing short of infuriating.

Pontius Navigator
25th Dec 2017, 21:57
There was also the commercial fear that people would wait for free or cheap food.

Trossie
25th Dec 2017, 22:35
I will echo what Dan_Brown has said. Anyone who dreams to talk about 'poverty' in Britain needs to get out there and see what real poverty is in so much of the world, and how people in such perceived poverty are often living quite well. (I am just waiting for, ahem, high-minded contributions from certain, ahem, Gruinard quoting regular posters to see their detached contributions!).

The word 'education' often needs to be replaced with the words 'kick in the bum'. That would be a lot more beneficial to so many of those in 'poverty' than any hand-outs.

But then, maybe this is something that is bordering on the 'Darwin Awards'?

Pitchpoller
25th Dec 2017, 23:12
‘We should be making sure people are properly fed, safe and have houses that aren’t damp’

If that is revolutionary, then gawd 'elp us all.

Dan Gerous
26th Dec 2017, 10:54
Why don't Tesco, et al, just drop their prices in the first place!

under_exposed
26th Dec 2017, 12:40
Because they operate on a very small margin for the majority of what they sell?

BehindBlueEyes
26th Dec 2017, 13:23
I will echo what Dan_Brown has said. Anyone who dreams to talk about 'poverty' in Britain needs to get out there and see what real poverty is in so much of the world, and how people in such perceived poverty are often living quite well. (I am just waiting for, ahem, high-minded contributions from certain, ahem, Gruinard quoting regular posters to see their detached contributions!).

The word 'education' often needs to be replaced with the words 'kick in the bum'. That would be a lot more beneficial to so many of those in 'poverty' than any hand-outs.

But then, maybe this is something that is bordering on the 'Darwin Awards'?

Quite agree. Poverty is all relative I suppose. In the UK, the ‘poor’ have access to free health care, free education, benefits etc. They would consider themselves deprived despite having a car, TV, mobile phone, X Box and clothes from JJB Sports/Sports Direct/fake Burberry. I’m afraid I won’t donate to food banks having seen first hand the abuse of generosity by many of these individuals who feel it’s their entitlement.

Someone who is poor in Syria, Africa or some South American countries, for example, would have to make a choice between feeding themselves or their children or maybe selling themselves to keep a roof over their heads. That’s true poverty, not the soft “ help me, it’s not my fault” subculture we seem to have in the West.

And I promise I’m NOT a Daily Mail reader and generally vote left of centre.

Jet II
26th Dec 2017, 14:41
Three GP practices in Lambeth, south London, will launch a pilot scheme next year to offer food vouchers on prescription, while other schemes combatting issues like loneliness, obesity and stress already offer patients referrals to gardening clubs or cooking lessons.

Cooking and Gardening lessons on the NHS - seems that it is becoming more a social services department than a system for actually treating the sick.

Pitchpoller
26th Dec 2017, 16:07
more a social services department than a system for actually treating the sick.

Is Prevention better than Cure?

Might it also be cheaper too?

Sounds like sound investment, to me.

The Nip
26th Dec 2017, 16:07
BBE,

Nothing against your post. It is just the word free. Nothing is free. Someone is paying for others to enable others to pay nothing.

When there is a system that enables some to make a comfortable living doing SFA, then more people will join in.

Pontius Navigator
26th Dec 2017, 16:19
Because they operate on a very small margin for the majority of what they sell?

But that small margin allows for the waste they dump. Of course they also persuade us to pay for some they would have to dump. I just threw out a half price pack of Spainish raspberries and a full pack of ham and loads of veg. It is often rotten by the time we get home.

Jet II
26th Dec 2017, 16:41
Is Prevention better than Cure?

Might it also be cheaper too?

Sounds like sound investment, to me.

That would depend on your personal circumstances - if you were being denied cancer treatment or were waiting in pain for an op because the NHS had spent its budget on Gardening Lessons I suggest you might possibly have a different view..

gileraguy
26th Dec 2017, 23:08
In the book Eggs or Anarchy , by William Sitwell, the results on the British population of rationing during WWII was to elevate the level of public health of the society.

The British people as a whole had never been healthier prior to that time because their diet was imposed by the rationing system. Low fat, high fibre diets meant that the population on average was surprisingly healthy.

The book is a very interesting read.

NutLoose
27th Dec 2017, 01:47
Now this is really smart.

Help a Hungry Child: NHS doctors to pilot food prescriptions as poverty soars | The Independent (http://www.independent.co.uk/helpahungrychild/doctors-nhs-food-prescriptions-pilot-poverty-soars-a8119221.html)

More Brilliance.

I read that Tesco, Aldi and others are now going to donate leftover food to the needy, instead of binning it. Whoopee!! What I want to know is, why wasn't this carried out decades before??!!! Oh the fear of litigation. B.S, total wanten waste is what has been going on.

When you have seen people dying of starvation at first hand, it is nothing short of infuriating.

Simple economics, if you give food away free then those people / charities/ organisations do not need to buy in food and hence you are cutting your own throat revenue wise, your pricing structure factors in wastage, therefore it costs you to give it away.

That said good on them, the amount that gets binned is unreal, I know a certain company used to send food to landfill that was underweight in the packaging so could not leagally be sold and to repackage would cost more than it was worth.

megan
27th Dec 2017, 13:05
They would consider themselves deprived despite having a car, TV, mobile phone, X Box and clothes from JJB Sports/Sports Direct/fake BurberryYer forgot booze and fags BBE.

Trossie
27th Dec 2017, 13:21
The really sad thing about that Sudanese photo is that there would have been many living extremely affluently in Sudan at the time. That cannot be compared with the situation in Europe where we (generally) no longer have those conflicts that blight other parts of the world.

The 'poor' in the UK are not really poor when compared with other parts of the world or even the fairly recent UK past. (That is something that the Cortwit doesn't seem to have realised, possibly because in that fairly recent past he enjoyed an affluent upbringing and a grammar school education that kept him detached from the comparative poverty that existed then; but bleating about a 'poverty' that he doesn't really comprehend ensures him an affluent parliamentary income!)

Blacksheep
27th Dec 2017, 13:37
It all makes quite a change from when my generation were deliberately starved by the Atlee government in order to pay for the nationalisation of our primary industries. At the age of sixteen I weighed eight stone and stood five feet one and a quarter inches in my stocking'd feet at my RAF induction medical. Such was not unusual for youngsters from Glasgow, Merseyside, North East England and South Wales at the time.

One of my strongest memories is of being permanently hungry. I'd eat anything I could lay my hands on and was fond of raiding the allotments for potatoes, which I'd eat raw. That's what being hungry means.

BehindBlueEyes
27th Dec 2017, 19:10
The really sad thing about that Sudanese photo is that there would have been many living extremely affluently in Sudan at the time. That cannot be compared with the situation in Europe where we (generally) no longer have those conflicts that blight other parts of the world.

The 'poor' in the UK are not really poor when compared with other parts of the world or even the fairly recent UK past. (That is something that the Cortwit doesn't seem to have realised, possibly because in that fairly recent past he enjoyed an affluent upbringing and a grammar school education that kept him detached from the comparative poverty that existed then; but bleating about a 'poverty' that he doesn't really comprehend ensures him an affluent parliamentary income!)

Re the Sudanese photo; by shocking comparison, the amount of food chucked away at my school following the ‘brilliant’ idea of free school meals for 5-7 year olds is appalling. It’s a complete waste of money. Clearly, the average child in the UK, despite good intentions, is either not that hungry or pretty fussy. The quality isn’t bad - I deliberately order a meal every so often for quality control - but the scrapings bucket overflows every lunch time. Most are unwilling to try anything remotely different and clearly very few have experienced mashed potato the way they avoid it. Use of knives and forks is alien to many and it’s obvious that few families sit down to eat as the standard of table manners is non existent. I’ve spoken to some parents as I was concerned that, because their offspring weren’t eating enough, they might prefer a packed lunch. This suggestion was rejected as, “Why should I? My kid’s getting free food.”

flash8
27th Dec 2017, 19:14
Actually in the end all I care about it whether the Child is eating adequately or not.

How the food or why the food gets to them is of secondary importance.

Blacksheep
27th Dec 2017, 23:09
So that was you making crunching and guzzling noises at the back of the Astra!3A Wing Apprentices Mess Halton was like heaven to me. All you could eat and then more. Breakfast starter of cereal then porridge followed up with a plate of sausages, bacon, egg, fried bread, stewed tomatoes and baked beans. Toast and jam and a pint mug of coffee to finish. I could hardly believe that first morning and in my first year I gained two and a half stone and five inches in height.

radeng
28th Dec 2017, 17:29
Most are unwilling to try anything remotely different and clearly very few have experienced mashed potato the way they avoid it.

If it is anything like the mashed potato of my (long ago) school dinners, avoiding it is the correct thing to do.

NRU74
28th Dec 2017, 19:26
3A Wing Apprentices Mess Halton was like heaven to me. All you could eat and then more. Breakfast starter of cereal then porridge followed up with a plate of sausages, bacon, egg, fried bread, stewed tomatoes and baked beans. Toast and jam and a pint mug of coffee to finish. I could hardly believe that first morning and in my first year I gained two and a half stone and five inches in height.

I suspect your upbringing was somewhat similar to mine.
I was in the school cadet force and we went to ‘Field Days’ at Waddington and Newton. I couldn’t believe (at the age of 13) the amount of food that was available at lunchtime.
When we went to ‘Camp’, I think the first place was Manby, I’d never ever had two eggs for breakfast before. Also being able to have a bath full to the brim, and then have another bath the following night was a completely new experience.
I went to S Cerney at 17 and the 14inch detachable collar was too big for me - but not for long!

funfly
28th Dec 2017, 22:11
I'm with Dan Brown on this, credit to Tesco for making a start, of course it should have been done a long time ago.
Two comments I hate;
"Charity begins at home"
"No good giving to charities, it all goes in admin and director's salaries anyway".
IMHO just an excuse not to give at all. Even if only 10% of what you give to a charity gets to an actual starving person then that's more than if you didn't give at all.
I sat down to a good dinner on Christmas day, as I do most days, and consider myself very lucky indeed. Even in the UK there are hundreds who get not enough to eat any day.
And please don't use "well they've all got their Sky and iPhones" as just another excuse.
It's just under zero Centigrade tonight as I write this tonight.
No, I don't go out into the streets and help but that's a poor reflection on me.

Dan_Brown
30th Dec 2017, 09:50
https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/5234049/m-and-s-food-charity-binned-christmas/

C.T.A., Cover thy A**

Trossie
30th Dec 2017, 12:02
That Sun story looks like typical tabloid bollocks to me. No mention of what M&S did give to charities. That '£10,000' (how did they actually derive that figure?) from one store targeted by 'wheelie-bin sniffling' journalists (nicely justifying that term 'gutter press'!!) was probably a tiny fraction of what M&S did contribute country-wide. And was there someone from any of those charities at hand, at that store, to take it all at such short notice? (I wonder what one would have found in the wheelie-ins of the Sun's offices on Christmas Eve??!! I suspect some good stories could be made up from what would have been found then!! I wonder what the, ahem, Guardian's wheelie-bins would reveal??!!!)

The problem these days is that food is so cheap. I just don't understand why people are 'hungry'. Now in other parts of the world I can fully understand that people would be hungry, but it usually has to do with primitive feuding gits running their countries rather than the normal modern world.

Dan_Brown
30th Dec 2017, 14:17
I take it M and S would take legal action if the story is untrue.

Yes food is cheap when you have it. There are hungry people in the UK.

The Sun, (gutter press if you prefer) speaks more sense to me, than any politician that i have heard whenever they open their trap. Some of the columist are truly awe inspiring when they put pen to paper.😁

Pontius Navigator
31st Dec 2017, 09:51
Funfly, I give to specific charities by subscription. As a 40% tax payer it used to reduce my tax bill and increase the value of my donation too.

It used to be that small cash donations missed out on gift aid. I think Osbourne changed that. Now, as long as a certain percentage of funding is raised through subscription and gift aided, cash donations can also attract gift aid. This is useful as non-tax payers can effectively add gift aid increase at no cost to them.

I still prefer to subscribe as I know where it goes. BTW, did you know Royal Palaces are also a charity?

oldpax
1st Jan 2018, 02:06
I am a little puzzled by "Blacksheeps comments,I was brought up in the same era(a little earlier than Blacksheep),I cannot say I was ever hungry or short of food and I lived in a mining village up north!Five in the house mother ,aunty,grandma and my cousin ,all on rations,all widows.Plenty of Rabbit on the menu and fish were plentiful then(1940s).Halton sounds much better than St Athans boys camp!