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ORAC
20th Dec 2017, 05:06
BBC job advert for head of change is beyond satire (https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/bbc-job-advert-for-head-of-change-is-beyond-satire-d6z8g9b8k)

The BBC comedy W1A has been praised for skewering the impenetrable jargon and management speak so popular with the corporation’s executives. However, even the show’s scriptwriters would have drawn the line at a real job advertised on the BBC website.

The corporation is looking for a head of change earning up to £78,000 a year, but applicants could be forgiven for wondering what, exactly, their duties would be. The introduction gives a sense of the jargon that follows, stating that the successful candidate will be expected to “influence the success of the Terms & Conditions programme with far-reaching impacts” while also “leveraging opportunities for benefits”. The full job description, which runs to four A4 pages, only serves to cloud the issue further. The head of change must “engage senior stakeholders to understand change impacts” and ensure that the “change environment is understood”, while simultaneously acting as a role model for “good practice change management competences and behaviours”.

The word “change” appears 77 times in the job description. “Oversee and gain senior stakeholder buy-in for the design and planning of the required change management interventions required to successfully embed the change,” reads one task. Strong interpersonal and communication skills are deemed essential for the role — presumably to improve the clarity of future job specifications.

The advert has been circulated among BBC journalists infuriated by the jargon adopted by senior executives and human resources staff. Many noted that the job title appeared to have drawn inspiration from the satirical “head of values” and “director of better” posts filled by Hugh Bonneville and Sarah Parish’s characters in W1A.

Previously the BBC has been criticised for using opaque and exotic job titles such as identity architect, controller of knowledge and controller of vision. Other vacancies on the BBC website include Doctor Who digital marketing manager, localisation senior executive and senior tester, content discovery.

In October external consultants commissioned by the BBC urged managers to whittle down the corporation’s estimated 5,000 job titles to improve pay transparency. The corporation is said to have been working on a review for more than a year and hopes to reduce the number of titles to 575. “We understand that this has not yet been implemented and we would recommend that it be completed as soon as possible to provide more clarity in relation to job titles,” the report by Eversheds, a law firm, said......

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/imageserver/image/methode%2Ftimes%2Fprod%2Fweb%2Fbin%2Ff2a57196-e4eb-11e7-a07e-b2db9e9d66b2.jpg?crop=2025%2C1139%2C474%2C45&resize=2400

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According to its advert the BBC’s head of change will:

•Ensure that there is a defined and agreed vision, a clear picture of the future state, a fit for purpose Target Operating Model, and that the change environment is understood.

•Lead and manage stakeholder engagement and communications, set up advocacy and ensure ‘change agents’ are mobilised.

•Provide thought leadership and leadership for the change management profession — inspiring others and applying knowledge and experience to grow CM maturity.

•Identify overt and covert organisation culture and its influence on the change.

•‘Flex’ to changes in focus.

ImageGear
20th Dec 2017, 05:21
More than a wind of change needs to blow through that place, I'm thinking hurricane. The institution needs to be levelled and covered in a deep layer of sea sand. :}

meadowrun
20th Dec 2017, 05:22
What a pile of steaming horse manure.
First change I'd make would be to lose the entire department that wrote that.


But not for "up to £78,000 a year". That's the real joke. Pocket change that makes you completely ineffectual in making any kind of change. You might be able to get the regular scones changed to raisin.

Andy_S
20th Dec 2017, 07:09
And yet my TV Licence has just gone up.

The BBC shouldn't be getting a penny more while they're creating meaningless jobs like this.

treadigraph
20th Dec 2017, 07:13
Those last bullet points just prove that every HR department is armed with a Bullshit dictionary.

UniFoxOs
20th Dec 2017, 07:41
I worked for the BBC 50 years ago. The most common phrase I remember hearing amongst the staff was "too many chiefs and not enough indians". It has only gone downhill from there.

ETOPS
20th Dec 2017, 07:47
An acquaintance of mine does exactly this job for our local council - he does, however, get nearly double that amount per year!!

Job description is identical.

yellowtriumph
20th Dec 2017, 09:29
Why didn't the advert simply say "Wanted, Jobsworth"?

Mariner9
20th Dec 2017, 09:41
BBC Executive 1 " We need to change Top Gear from a popular to an unpopular show"
BBC Executive 2 "Don't be daft, its our most popular program and best export"
BBC Board "We clearly need a Change Manager to stop unhelpful attitudes like Executive 2's from prevailing"

PDR1
20th Dec 2017, 09:47
Hmmm....I understand what they are looking for in almost all of those bullet points. The only bit I don't get is the last one (I'm guessing it means "you will need to be prepared to go along with complete charges of direction when the senior leadership team react to the next daily wail tantrum").

Of all of it the only part I have difficulty with is where they refer to the "change management profession". As far as I am aware no charter has ever been granted to an Institute of Change Management (there is a Change Management Institute, but it has no accreditation and cannot bestow professional registrations).

But while the language of the rest is rather flowery I don't thing anyone who has been involved in senior roles would really have much difficulty understanding what the successful candidate would be expected to actually do or why the role was actually needed.

PDR

VP959
20th Dec 2017, 09:51
The ability for HR people to come up with BS like this seems uncontrollable. Before I retired, I had two projects that were within a big programme I was managing, both being delivered by project managers within HR. I repeatedly failed to get either of them, or their boss, the HR director, to grasp the concept that every project MUST have specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time-defined objectives. No matter how hard I pushed (and I pushed hard enough to end up having several rows with the HR director) I could not get the HR project managers to understand these really fundamental principles.

At project reviews I'd ask how they were going to, for example, measure an outcome and determine whether or it complied with any set target. Not once did I ever get an answer that made sense, they would always answer along the lines of "how the culture had evolved" or "the feeling of well-being amongst the staff".

In the end I saw my boss, the Chief Exec, and requested that the two HR projects be removed from my programme as they had no deliverable outcomes, and were just soaking up resource with no benefit. My real reason for getting these project excluded was that I knew they would both fail to deliver at the end of the programme and there wasn't a thing I could do about it, plus I wanted the HR director to take the blame, not me. Thankfully this happened and the HR Director resigned.

UniFoxOs
20th Dec 2017, 11:31
Hmmm....I understand what they are looking for in almost all of those bullet points.

So do I, but I fail to understand why they can't put the same meaning into a sentence of no more than seven words, each one of no more than seven letters. That's my description of clarity. I wonder if any of the applicants understand what the selectors want, or whether they think they (the candidates) can take it to mean whatever they like and do a crap job.

VP959
20th Dec 2017, 11:38
I remember once enquiring about a job and being told in glowing terms about the responsibilities, the desired outcomes, etc, etc. When I asked the simple question "What authority do I have to ensure these outcomes are delivered?", I was met with a blank look. I had a chat with some other people in that department and all became clear. They had been set some objectives by central government, had failed to do anything to meet them and wanted to employ someone for as little money as possible in order to be the fall guy when the departmental targets were reviewed a few months later..............

G0ULI
20th Dec 2017, 11:43
The BBC are going commercial. More and more programming will be shifted to on-line streaming that will be individually targeted at their audience. You will eventually be persuaded to pay through the nose for content that should be available for free. Then there is the advertising revenue, again targeted to your individual tastes from the details you are forced to provide before they let you watch anything.

All for your personal convenience, of course!

FakePilot
20th Dec 2017, 13:19
Sounds like a position created with the applicant already picked.

Sallyann1234
20th Dec 2017, 15:08
Sounds like a position created with the applicant already picked.
Wouldn't be the first time, and probably to an inside candidate. They have to advertise externally anyway. I know someone who wanted to apply for a BBC post. They made some discrete enquiries to get background information and soon realised that it was a waste of time to apply.

ImageGear
20th Dec 2017, 15:09
Sounds like a position created with the applicant already picked.

Yup, and the prospective incumbent, at the request of his recruiters, wrote his own spec and which is why he, and his recruiter are able to perpetuate the same ridiculous charade.

As usual the rot starts at the top.

Imagegear

G-CPTN
20th Dec 2017, 15:31
Stakeholder management intervention = talk to people . . .

Andy_S
20th Dec 2017, 15:44
Wouldn't be the first time, and probably to an inside candidate.

Yes, that makes perfect sense. Appointing, as a champion for ‘change’, an insider who is steeped in the culture of the BBC.

Do you think the Beeb would get the irony?

Ancient Observer
20th Dec 2017, 16:02
Trots and Pinkoes do not do irony.
They just shoot disbelievers.

Krystal n chips
20th Dec 2017, 16:53
.

Yup, and the prospective incumbent, at the request of his recruiters, wrote his own spec and which is why he, and his recruiter are able to perpetuate the same ridiculous charade.

As usual the rot starts at the top.

Imagegear

Some bad news for the chaps now currently participating in that regular staple when it comes to the BBC "disgusted of JB ! ".

The BBC are far from alone when it comes to writing " yuckspeak library of one million " ( with due acknowledgement to "Uncle Roger " ) job specs.

HM Gov't are pretty good as well. One notable example being when I applied for an engineering job and received the immortal reply " the paper sifting team have now completed their formal candidate evaluation analysis "...and no, I'm not making this up....which in English meant you can't have the interview despite being qualified, because, as I later found out, the job was earmarked for some about to retire senile, dribbling S.N.C.O.

Another listed some very detailed experience requirements for something to do with nuclear engineering which, strangely, there was only ever likely to be one candidate for ( and it weren't me or anybody else who read the internal / external... because they had to ) job spec.

And I've seen plenty of others all in the same incestuous style.

andytug
20th Dec 2017, 17:02
Change management is what they shift people they can't get rid of or downgrade into when they turn out to be [email protected] at managing people.
Thus you get changes delivered badly, and the change teams disappear off to the next project leaving the business-as-usual people in a heap of you know what and no guidance to get them out of it.
Then the senior managers wring their hands when the staff survey says for the nth year running that change is handled badly in the organisation....... Reap what you sow...

reynoldsno1
20th Dec 2017, 19:31
I have recently notified my 'manager' that I am going to retire - by letter. I copied it to Payroll (most important) and HR (they call themselves the "People Team")
Two days later I received an email from HR "approving" my retirement. I resisted responding...

Slow Biker
21st Dec 2017, 21:18
'some about to retire senile, dribbling S.N.C.O' Oo er, do I detect a whiff of the Green Monster here?

kkbuk
21st Dec 2017, 22:13
I think that you may, Slow Biker.

longer ron
21st Dec 2017, 22:53
One notable example being when I applied for an engineering job and received the immortal reply " the paper sifting team have now completed their formal candidate evaluation analysis ''

Yes I got this reply once - but the guy on the phone said ' but you sound like a well qualified candidate' so if you get your cv in to us really quickly we will have a look LOL
So they did and I did not screw up the interview too badly :) - got the job :ok:

Then again I am an easy going guy with no chips on my shoulders and I am not bitter and twisted - just like yourself KnC :)

Jet II
22nd Dec 2017, 00:11
£78k sounds like quite a low salary for the Beeb, is this just a fancy job description for the tea boy?