PDA

View Full Version : Wine fridge .. icing up all the time and water dripping out the front.


yellowtriumph
15th Dec 2017, 18:00
As per the thread title really. We have had a Baumatic BWE40 standalone wine fridge for 10 years or so. It has always had a problem pretty much right from the start. The sequence goes something like this. Turn fridge on and set the temperature to 9 degrees. Wait a few weeks and gradually notice the rear wall of the fridge icing up. Wait a couple of more weeks and notice the carpet in the utility room is wet as water is escaping from underneath the front of the fridge door. Turn wine fridge off and remove all contents. Remove ice from the back wall and particularly where it is iced up on the lower area around the slanting channel that is supposed to direct molten ice towards the drain pipe that leads down to the evaporator tray above the condenser/motor unit.


Note two things: The evaporator tray is completely dry, and secondly that the small diameter plastic drain pipe that leads from the sloping channel from the interior of the fridge is iced up and 75% blocked too - hence molten ice (caused by the de-icing cycle in the fridge?) cannot escape down to the evaporator tray, and possibly hangs around the top of the plastic tube inside the slanting tray causing further problems with icing and blocking.


Having cleared the ice off the back of the fridge using a hair dryer (yes - I know I shouldn't), double check the drain plastic pipe is clear of any ice and debris (it always is), restock the fridge and repeat every few weeks.


I really am getting fed up with this.


Naturally I have looked it up on the internet and the common answer is always that the fridge is working overtime because it is continually trying to cool down air that must be leaking past the door to cabinet seals. Of course I have looked into this. The door to cabinet seal is of the soft pleated magnetic type. I have checked all round the fridge on all four sides of the door by shutting the door with a sheet of A4 paper trapped between the door and the cabinet. I always have to apply some moderate force to pull the paper out and surely this tells me that the seal is ok. I have inspected the door seal most carefully and there is no obvious mechanical damage that I can see, I have peered at it whilst closing it with a torch light running along the edge of the seal to see any 'cracks of light' that might indicate a duff seal - but everything seems fine.


I am at my wits end with it really.


Any thoughts from the team?

NutLoose
15th Dec 2017, 18:05
Troubleshooting: Icing Up / Loud Noise BREEZAIRE (http://www.lecachewinecabinets.com/s.nl/ctype.KB/it.I/id.29/KB.1756/.f)

http://www.lecachewinecabinets.com/s.nl/ctype.KB/it.I/id.450/KB.2447/.f?category=21

VP959
15th Dec 2017, 18:07
My guess is that there is a thermostat problem, that is allowing the compressor to run on for far too long.

Have you tried putting a thermometer inside the fridge and seeing how cool it is getting?

If ice is forming then clearly that part of the fridge is getting below zero, and for a fridge designed to run at 9 deg C that seems way too cool, even if there was a leaking door seal (and from your description it seems that there isn't).

The other remote possibility is that the fridge is located too close to a heat source, perhaps something warming up one side. My money is still on a faulty thermostat, though.

NutLoose
15th Dec 2017, 18:10
Different make, but probably the same idea

Breezaire wine cooling units are not equipped with automatic defrost cycles, and if/when ice builds up inside the cooling unit, a loud clattering sound will occur as the fan blades strike the ice.
Good airflow for the cooling unit - inside and outside the wine cellar - is essential to the performance of the wine cooling unit.

Outside the wine cellar, if the coils are not cleaned periodically and/or airflow to the coils is restricted, the cooling unit will need to work extra hard to achieve the desired temperature inside the cellar, and as a result may cause ice buildup.

Inside the wine cellar, if bottles are placed directly below the cold airflow, the airflow will be restricted and may cause the cooling unit to backup, thereby causing ice buildup.

The cooling unit also may ice up if it starts losing its refrigerant (until the refrigerant is gone, at which point the ice buildup will cease.)
If your Breezaire cooling unit ices up (or starts making a loud clattering noise), follow the instructions below:

G-CPTN
15th Dec 2017, 18:16
It has always had a problem pretty much right from the start.

Which suggests the environment where the 'fridge is located might be less than ideal.

mrangryofwarlingham
15th Dec 2017, 18:17
Turn your fridge off and put your beer in your garage

NutLoose
15th Dec 2017, 18:44
Turn your fridge off and put your beer in your stomach

Octane
15th Dec 2017, 21:28
The technical term for molten ice is... water!:}

G-CPTN
15th Dec 2017, 21:38
Or slush . . .

BlankBox
15th Dec 2017, 22:49
...real men drink Beer...and its never around long enough to get warm... :cool:

FullOppositeRudder
15th Dec 2017, 22:58
As VP959 suggested, get a thermometer and monitor the internal temperature as a first priority.

That there is enough humid air being admitted to the fridge to form an increasing ice build up is also curious. Of course you may live in the tropics and drink a lot of wine - and there's nothing wrong with that whatsoever.

FOR

ExSp33db1rd
16th Dec 2017, 04:46
Have a similar problem with our fridge/feezer. Initial thoughts were that the drain tube to the evaporation tray was blocked, so when auto defrosting the resultant water seeped into the cabinet and re-froze. We get ice covered "floor" to the freezer cabinet and occasionally water on the floor.

No way I can see to inspect any of the "works"by removing panels - which I can't remove, tho' doubtless a Mitsubishi technician could - if we could locate one locally.

Assuming the drain tube was blocked with ice, we emptied the unit and applied a fan heater for sometime, then left well alone for 24 hrs. before switching on again, and ... so far ... all seems well. Only time will tell.

Ancient Mariner
16th Dec 2017, 06:27
Depending on how clean you keep the inside of the fridge, the drain will eventually clog up with all sorts of crap, fungus and whatnot.
You'll be surprised.:yuk:
Per

Pontius Navigator
16th Dec 2017, 08:13
AM, our Baumatic packed up after 7 years (thermostat and it wouldn't cool). I stripped it down and everything is as you describe.

Agree with VP, a thermometer was my first thought.

The thing you didnt mention was the cooling vanes. Ours had a think 'filter' mat aka dust and dog hair. Once removed I was able remove grunge from inside.

Then try running it freestanding out of the unit and check temperature.

yellowtriumph
16th Dec 2017, 12:44
My guess is that there is a thermostat problem, that is allowing the compressor to run on for far too long.

Have you tried putting a thermometer inside the fridge and seeing how cool it is getting?

If ice is forming then clearly that part of the fridge is getting below zero, and for a fridge designed to run at 9 deg C that seems way too cool, even if there was a leaking door seal (and from your description it seems that there isn't).

The other remote possibility is that the fridge is located too close to a heat source, perhaps something warming up one side. My money is still on a faulty thermostat, though.

I have a very accurate thermocouple instrument somewhere in the garage and I will have a measure next week. All I can say at the moment is that if I alter the temperature setting it is obvious ‘by touch’ that the temperature is changing - but of course that is subjective at the moment. Fridge is located in the utility room, under a worktop counter, plenty of room for air to circulate around it. I would say the room temeperature is pretty constant at around 20/22 degrees even though the boiler is in the same room. Will report back.

yellowtriumph
16th Dec 2017, 12:48
Different make, but probably the same idea

Breezaire wine cooling units are not equipped with automatic defrost cycles, and if/when ice builds up inside the cooling unit, a loud clattering sound will occur as the fan blades strike the ice.
Good airflow for the cooling unit - inside and outside the wine cellar - is essential to the performance of the wine cooling unit.

Outside the wine cellar, if the coils are not cleaned periodically and/or airflow to the coils is restricted, the cooling unit will need to work extra hard to achieve the desired temperature inside the cellar, and as a result may cause ice buildup.

Inside the wine cellar, if bottles are placed directly below the cold airflow, the airflow will be restricted and may cause the cooling unit to backup, thereby causing ice buildup.

The cooling unit also may ice up if it starts losing its refrigerant (until the refrigerant is gone, at which point the ice buildup will cease.)
If your Breezaire cooling unit ices up (or starts making a loud clattering noise), follow the instructions below:

Doesn’t sound like the principle my wine cooler works on - it is very much like a normal fridge like the sort you have in your average kitchen for general food use etc. Perhaps the exception would be there is no visible cold plate Marlarkey at the back of the fridge - I guess that bit would be directly behind and firmly attached to the other side of the back of the fridge. No fans or filters anywhere.

yellowtriumph
16th Dec 2017, 12:50
Which suggests the environment where the 'fridge is located might be less than ideal.

The wine fridge has been in two different locations due to house moves - in both cases I would say the fridge has been situated in a reasonable ambient temperature. Certainly never in an environment near freezing which I know can severely affect fridges.

yellowtriumph
16th Dec 2017, 12:52
As VP959 suggested, get a thermometer and monitor the internal temperature as a first priority.

That there is enough humid air being admitted to the fridge to form an increasing ice build up is also curious. Of course you may live in the tropics and drink a lot of wine - and there's nothing wrong with that whatsoever.

FOR

We live in the uk and would not describe the air as being humid other than what we might normally expect in the UK.

Ancient Mariner
16th Dec 2017, 12:54
AM, our Baumatic packed up after 7 years (thermostat and it wouldn't cool). I stripped it down and everything is as you describe.

Agree with VP, a thermometer was my first thought.

The thing you didnt mention was the cooling vanes. Ours had a think 'filter' mat aka dust and dog hair. Once removed I was able remove grunge from inside.

Then try running it freestanding out of the unit and check temperature.
You're right, but it's so easy to forget. How often do you pull the fridge out from the wall?
Bought a huge American double fridge/freezer in Manila, moved to Norway after three years and the amount of dust and crap in every nook and cranny was unbelievable.
Cleaned most of it out mechanically, then used electrical cleaner and compressed air for the rest.
Air in Makati not the best. :hmm:
Per

cattletruck
16th Dec 2017, 12:54
Sometimes white goods are just total garbage from brand new. I purchase a fridge for the holiday house and during summer when it's stressed it builds up ice, starts making all sorts of funny noises, and needs de-icing every 3 weeks.

By chance I discovered my brother had exactly the same fridge but on the other side of the planet which also exhibited the exact same issues as mine.

He had thrown his fridge out a long time ago. I'm still putting up with mine for now....

yellowtriumph
16th Dec 2017, 13:01
Depending on how clean you keep the inside of the fridge, the drain will eventually clog up with all sorts of crap, fungus and whatnot.
You'll be surprised.:yuk:
Per

The inside of the fridge is only used to house wine. The inside of the fridge is therefore always clean. Whenever I have to clean out the back of the fridge/slanting collection tray at the bottom of the back panel that is supposed to direct molten ice (water) towards the drain tube/the drain tube itself are always clogged up with ice - there is never any ‘crap’ - always just ice. And do please remember, the drain tube itself which is about 3”long is itself clogged up with ice for the first 2” inches of its length - if it is being clogged up with ice, how can any water due from the defrosting cycle get down it.

As I left it yesterday, the back of the fridge is clear of ice and is clean, the slanting water collection tray at the back of the fridge is clean, the drain tube to take defrosted water away to the evaporator tray mounted on top of the compressor underneath is clean, the temperature is set to 10 degrees - yet I know in a few weeks time I will have to repeat the whole process!

VP959
16th Dec 2017, 13:27
................. the temperature is set to 10 degrees - yet I know in a few weeks time I will have to repeat the whole process!

But is it REALLY set to 10 deg?

What if the thermostat dial/settings are telling you that it is set to 10 deg, but the thermostat itself is trying to reach a target temperature of, say, -5 deg?

How would you know, other than there being a lot of ice build up on the cooling element?

It could have been like this from new, with a faulty thermostat or defective or disconnected temperature sensor (the latter if it's an electronic thermostat).

yellowtriumph
16th Dec 2017, 13:48
But is it REALLY set to 10 deg?

What if the thermostat dial/settings are telling you that it is set to 10 deg, but the thermostat itself is trying to reach a target temperature of, say, -5 deg?

How would you know, other than there being a lot of ice build up on the cooling element?

It could have been like this from new, with a faulty thermostat or defective or disconnected temperature sensor (the latter if it's an electronic thermostat).

I agree with you. I did post above that if I varied the thermostat setting the interior of the cabinet did seem to vary accordingly although this could only be considered subjective. I will try and take some objective measurements next week if I can find the thermocouple temp kit. By hand, and of course this really is very subjective, it never feels anything like 0 degrees inside the cabinet. But yet there is ice build upon the back of the interior of the cabinet so it clearly is working hard to achieve something!

VP959
16th Dec 2017, 14:04
Wine coolers don't have a massive cooling capacity, as they aren't required to cool a great deal, no where near as much as a fridge or freezer. The chances are that the cooling system doesn't have the capacity to cool the cabinet much below about 5 or 6 deg C, but the cooling system could still be working flat out trying to get the cabinet well below it's design lowest temperature if the thermostat is constantly calling for greater cooling. The cabinet may well reach an equilibrium point, where the internal temperature is a bit lower than the set temperature, but where the heat gain through the door and insulation is equal to the maximum cooling capacity. At that point it's very likely that ice will build up, as the cooling system will be on virtually all the time.

Ancient Mariner
16th Dec 2017, 16:23
My wine fridge us set at 15C, quick to increase the temp for red, likewise reduce for white.
Don't know if it has any influence on longevity. The bottles never stay in there long enough.
It's a Samsung, 4/5 years old, never had a problem.
Per

NutLoose
16th Dec 2017, 17:18
How close is it to the wall, my fridge freezer came with little legs that kept a set distance to ensure a good airflow, if it is too close no matter how much you tweak other things the lack of airflow may be causing problems.

Pontius Navigator
17th Dec 2017, 10:30
Our wine fridge, and wine only, still filled with mould and fungi if not cleaned. The drain hole became blocked and the wooden shelving blackened.

The fungus spores are in the air.

Look at shower trays; consider legionnaires disease.

yellowtriumph
17th Dec 2017, 12:45
Wine coolers don't have a massive cooling capacity, as they aren't required to cool a great deal, no where near as much as a fridge or freezer. The chances are that the cooling system doesn't have the capacity to cool the cabinet much below about 5 or 6 deg C, but the cooling system could still be working flat out trying to get the cabinet well below it's design lowest temperature if the thermostat is constantly calling for greater cooling. The cabinet may well reach an equilibrium point, where the internal temperature is a bit lower than the set temperature, but where the heat gain through the door and insulation is equal to the maximum cooling capacity. At that point it's very likely that ice will build up, as the cooling system will be on virtually all the time.

I believe 5/6 degrees is the lowest you can set it to. I will check next week when I am back home and check the thermostat operation too.

yellowtriumph
17th Dec 2017, 12:49
How close is it to the wall, my fridge freezer came with little legs that kept a set distance to ensure a good airflow, if it is too close no matter how much you tweak other things the lack of airflow may be causing problems.

It is in a space underneath a worktop counter that is designed to normally take a tumble dryer. It is quite a few inches away from the back and side walls as it is a reasonably bit smaller than a tumble dryer. In our previous house it was completely free standing in an open space about 6” away from a wall. It has exhibited the same problem in both locations.

yellowtriumph
17th Dec 2017, 12:51
Our wine fridge, and wine only, still filled with mould and fungi if not cleaned. The drain hole became blocked and the wooden shelving blackened.

The fungus spores are in the air.

Look at shower trays; consider legionnaires disease.

I’m not sure what point you are trying to make? The inside of our wine fridge has always been immaculately clean. It is all smooth plastic sides etc with chrome plated wire racking - such as it is, it is not very large. The drain hole and tube is only ever bunged up with ice - eventually.

VP959
17th Dec 2017, 13:57
FWIW, legionnaires requires a temperature between 25 deg C and 45 deg C in which to thrive, so it isn't going to grow and multiply inside a fridge.

It also needs to be dispersed in some form of water borne aerosol in order to be inhaled and infect people, again something not likely from a fridge.

Turbine D
17th Dec 2017, 15:25
YT,
Turn fridge on and set the temperature to 9 degrees
Personally, I think 9ºC is too cool and your unit is straining to maintain that temperature over time. The ideal temperature according to most wine experts is 13ºC, a little warmer (14ºC) is better than a little cooler. We keep our unit at 14ºC.

Pontius Navigator
17th Dec 2017, 16:48
The point i was trying to make is that a clean fridge only ever used to store wine is NOT the reason it is fungus free. The spores are in the air. Legionnaires was used as an illustration and noit va suggestion that a cod fridge would incubate it.

yellowtriumph
17th Dec 2017, 17:54
YT,

Personally, I think 9ºC is too cool and your unit is straining to maintain that temperature over time. The ideal temperature according to most wine experts is 13ºC, a little warmer (14ºC) is better than a little cooler. We keep our unit at 14ºC.



There are up/down buttons so that you can manually set the temperature as you wish. Beside the up/down buttons are 3 small lamp indicators that illuminate in turn as you increase the temperature - each lamp indicates a range of temperatures for sparkling/white/red.


For example (but not accurate since I am not at home today so please don't take these figures as accurate as I am only using them as an example) - if you set the temperature anywhere between 5deg and 9deg the 'Sparkling' lamp is on. If you set it between 6deg and 10deg the 'White wine' lamp comes on. If you set it anywhere from 11deg to 12deg the 'red wine' lamp illuminates.


If the damn thing worked as it should it would suit our needs perfectly! I will be back home tomorrow and will do some measuring of temps and controls etc.


Edited to simply add that usually the wine is only filled with white wine and beer. The red wine stays in the cupboard under the stairs.

chuks
18th Dec 2017, 11:51
I would have a very close look at the door seal. If that's not right then moist and relatively warm outside air will enter and cause condensation inside the unit as it's cooled.

Of course you could always raise the temperature a bit to the point where this problem ceases, and then drink a bottle of wine to see if it's cool enough to suit your taste. (I find that after a bottle of wine most problems go away, but I'm not so very fussy as all that.)

yellowtriumph
18th Dec 2017, 15:30
I would have a very close look at the door seal. If that's not right then moist and relatively warm outside air will enter and cause condensation inside the unit as it's cooled.

Of course you could always raise the temperature a bit to the point where this problem ceases, and then drink a bottle of wine to see if it's cool enough to suit your taste. (I find that after a bottle of wine most problems go away, but I'm not so very fussy as all that.)

As you will have noted in my previous postings, I have very carefully inspected the door seals and they all look ok.

I am in the process of setting various temps and looking at the results both on the internal temp display and on a quality thermocouple meter placed in the vicinity of the thermostat. I hope to report back on my findings later today.

VP959
18th Dec 2017, 18:15
As you will have noted in my previous postings, I have very carefully inspected the door seals and they all look ok.

I am in the process of setting various temps and looking at the results both on the internal temp display and on a quality thermocouple meter placed in the vicinity of the thermostat. I hope to report back on my findings later today.

Fingers crossed that this reveals enough data to have a better stab at diagnosing the problem!

Krystal n chips
19th Dec 2017, 06:36
Fingers crossed that this reveals enough data to have a better stab at diagnosing the problem!

A solution is at hand.

Enthralling though it may be to analyse data ( other leisure pursuits are available ) given the fridge in question has seemingly never worked properly since new, then, erm, convey fridge to local recycling site.

Thereafter...... buy a new one.

Only on JB however, could such angst and concern be offered in respect of one of life's most pressing needs.......the state of a wine cooler.

Pontius Navigator
19th Dec 2017, 07:39
KnC is all heart. Ours failed right in that heatwave. We needed a very specific size. AO supplied one in 16 hours. I see larger coolers are available at a third the cost.

When we move will need to source a different size.

Avtrician
19th Dec 2017, 10:19
RIP fridge

yellowtriumph
19th Dec 2017, 10:25
A solution is at hand.

Enthralling though it may be to analyse data ( other leisure pursuits are available ) given the fridge in question has seemingly never worked properly since new, then, erm, convey fridge to local recycling site.

Thereafter...... buy a new one.

Only on JB however, could such angst and concern be offered in respect of one of life's most pressing needs.......the state of a wine cooler.

It is only because I observe the basic courtesies of life that prevent me from giving you a reply.

Uplinker
19th Dec 2017, 11:06
I admit I haven’t read the whole thread, so apologies if this has been mentioned:

An easy and effective way to clear the drain hole and tube at the back of a fridge is to use a long ‘ty-wrap’*, pointed end first.

These are flexible but strong, and ideal for the purpose - use the largest size that will fit down the tube. The pointed end will clear most crud from the tube, but will not cause any physical damage, unlike the end of a piece of wire which could dig in and go through the wall of the tube or detach it - or worse, contact something electrical.




* For any who don’t know: Ty-wraps, (aka ‘snap cuffs’), are those thin but incredibly strong plastic bands where you put the tail through a little square block at the other end, which contains a cam that clicks and locks the band. They are used to secure all manner of things to other things. You can get them at RS, Screwfix, Halfords, petrol stations etc.

yellowtriumph
19th Dec 2017, 12:05
I admit I haven’t read the whole thread, so apologies if this has been mentioned:

An easy and effective way to clear the drain hole and tube at the back of a fridge is to use a long ‘ty-wrap’*, pointed end first.

These are flexible but strong, and ideal for the purpose - use the largest size that will fit down the tube. The pointed end will clear most crud from the tube, but will not cause any physical damage, unlike the end of a piece of wire which could dig in and go through the wall of the tube or detach it - or worse, contact something electrical.




* For any who don’t know: Ty-wraps, (aka ‘snap cuffs’), are those thin but incredibly strong plastic bands where you put the tail through a little square block at the other end, which contains a cam that clicks and locks the band. They are used to secure all manner of things to other things. You can get them at RS, Screwfix, Halfords, petrol stations etc.

Thanks for your reply. I take your point, but the drain pipe shouldn't become blocked with ice in the first place - it's job being to drain water from the de-icing cycle down to the evaporator tray above the compressor. It's the fact that the top of the drain tube is becoming blocked with ice that causes the subsequent build up of ice/water around the top of the drain tube (inside the fridge) that then seeps out the front of the fridge - the water cant get away down the blocked drain tube.

yellowtriumph
19th Dec 2017, 12:15
Here are my results over the last 24 hours or so.

The set temp is the temperature I have set the fridge to be using it's up/down control buttons.

The indicated temp is the temperature the display reads inside the fridge - noted down by me after a reasonable length of time.

The actual temp is the temperature taken by a very accurate thermocouple meter placed just in front of the temperature sensing aperture (behind which I assume is the actual component). The area around the aperture is not congested by bottles etc. The room temperature varied a bit but i would say an average of 20 degrees would not be far off.

Set ___Indicated _________Actual
7__________8___________4.7 (the indicated never got down to 7 degrees)
9__________9___________7.9
11_________11__________11.3
14_________14__________11.9
18_________18__________16.3

Repeat
11_________11__________9.1

I did wonder if the higher temperature 'experiments' were entirely valid. By that I mean if the actual fridge temp was say 14C and I then changed the Set temperature to say 18C then the fridge can only achieve that by effectively sitting on it's hands and doing nothing. I wonder that if the bottles of wine were all at say 14C then would they be acting as a sort of reverse 'heat reserve' preventing the fridge from warming up to 18C - or at least very much slowing the process down? Having said that, I did leave it set to achieve 18C overnight and it didn't.

I wonder if I simply have to accept I have bought a duff product and should consider replacing it.

VP959
19th Dec 2017, 16:36
Looks to me as if the thermostat is way off, and the cooling system is trying to cool to a lot lower temperature than the set temperature. 4.7 deg C actual is really cold for a wine fridge, so at that point the cooling system was probably working at maximum all the time.

It may be possible to replace the thermostat/control unit, or perhaps just it's sensor, as it seem that the fault lies with that part of the fridge. Alternatively, if you want it to run at around 9 deg C, then you could just accept the error and have it set to 11 deg C, that may be enough to stop it icing up.

Uplinker
19th Dec 2017, 17:17
Thanks for your reply..............but the drain pipe shouldn't become blocked with ice in the first place - it's job being to drain water from the de-icing cycle down to the evaporator tray above the compressor.........

Yes in an ideal world I agree. The drain in our fridge blocks about once or twice a year with general crud, not ice. I used to use a bit of wire, but a ty-wrap is an ideal tool to clear it.

The clue ours has blocked is that there is water and ice on the bottom of the fridge, jamming up the veg box thing.

yellowtriumph
19th Dec 2017, 17:20
Looks to me as if the thermostat is way off, and the cooling system is trying to cool to a lot lower temperature than the set temperature. 4.7 deg C actual is really cold for a wine fridge, so at that point the cooling system was probably working at maximum all the time.

It may be possible to replace the thermostat/control unit, or perhaps just it's sensor, as it seem that the fault lies with that part of the fridge. Alternatively, if you want it to run at around 9 deg C, then you could just accept the error and have it set to 11 deg C, that may be enough to stop it icing up.

Thanks for the feedback VP. I mentioned a few posts back that after cleaning it all out of blocked ice and water I do set the the fridge to 10 degrees (as I have done in the past) and that it will simply go around in the same cycle as it always does.

I agree with your diagnosis but this model will be very obsolete and parts difficult to find and obtain.

I will bite the bullet and try and buy another one in the January sales. Our needs are modest, most importantly that it is a free-standing unit that fits in a space 69cm wide by say 83cm high. I will probably look for a reputable, well known make.

Thanks to all for your feedback.

yellowtriumph
19th Dec 2017, 17:22
Yes in an ideal world I agree. The drain in our fridge blocks about once or twice a year with general crud, not ice. I used to use a bit of wire, but a ty-wrap is an ideal tool to clear it.

The clue ours has blocked is that there is water and ice on the bottom of the fridge, jamming up the veg box thing.

There is no general crud. It is ice - pure and simple! We keep the inside immaculate.

Mr Optimistic
19th Dec 2017, 21:36
Despite drinking wine by the tanker load, I wasn't aware of the concept of a wine fridge, as opposed to say, a fridge. I believe restaurants rotate bottles into and out if the wine cooler as they believe it gets 'tired' if left in the cooler too long. Would seem to weigh against the idea of storing stuff long term in a fridge. Not a problem I have...

Don't think you need a quality thermometer, any old one will do for this. :)

Oh, yeah, I also think maybe 12 degrees would be cool enough for white, unless it's the sort my wife likes then maybe 0.1.

Espada III
19th Dec 2017, 21:54
There is no general crud. It is ice - pure and simple! We keep the inside immaculate.

Irrespective of how clean you keep the fridge, crud can accumulate in the drain passage; it may even be something left over from the manufacturing process. So when it happens again really clear out the drain, set the temperature at about 3 degrees more than you want and see what happens.