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Ollie Onion
11th Nov 2016, 04:24
Has just been announced internally that the Jetstar Cadet programme will be open again for applications in the next week. Applications will close by 25th November 2016. Keep an eye open if you are interested.

Dangly Bits
11th Nov 2016, 04:43
Where will the training be done?

mikewil
11th Nov 2016, 05:25
Any idea if it will be ab-initio only or of they will be looking at 'advanced' cadets?

Ollie Onion
11th Nov 2016, 08:18
"Know someone who dreams of becoming a pilot? Here is their chance. From next week applications open for the Jetstar Cadet Program, an academic and flight training program for aspiring pilots. The program is run with Swinburne University of Technology and CAE Oxford Aviation Academy, giving graduates the knowledge, skills and training to become a cadet pilot. We’re looking for the most impressive candidates to apply by 25 November, so please share this news with your family and friends."

Chips n gravy
11th Nov 2016, 08:48
Can't they get enough guys/girls from the regional airlines? i thought they were never going back to cadets after recent troubles!!

wheels_down
11th Nov 2016, 23:05
You'd think they would jump at the chance to poach a bunch of Tiger pilots considering the fleet changeover starts next month.

What's the wait for a command these days? 10 years?

Ollie Onion
11th Nov 2016, 23:14
From selection to arriving on line for a Cadet is around 18months, I would think there is plenty of scope to pick up a bunch of Tiger guys in the mean time if that is the intention.

log0008
11th Nov 2016, 23:21
how is the JetStar cadetship normally funded - Vet-Free-Help or Hex?

Eaglet
12th Nov 2016, 07:54
dehg5776, are you suggesting there will be some Tiger guys looking to jump ship as wheelsdown alluded to?

notabove500
12th Nov 2016, 09:07
I believe the programme used to be funded by VET FEE HELP with the outstanding costs paid in full by the cadet. Interesting to see what happens if there is no longer VET FEE HELP available from 2017

Stretch06
12th Nov 2016, 20:42
The current SUT B of Aviation and GC of Aviation is funded by Fee-Help, slight different and therefore not affected by the changes to VET Fee-Help

Stretch06
15th Nov 2016, 23:59
If anyone is interested, here is the link Jetstar Cadet Program - CAE Oxford Aviation Academy (http://www.caeoaa.com/jetstar)

notabove500
16th Nov 2016, 10:14
Every VET school has an application fee nowadays. Yes it's expensive, all ab initio cadetships generally are. In the past I think cadets have taken from 0-18months to get their type rating.

MACH082
16th Nov 2016, 13:51
May be expensive, but you'll earn that back in less than 18 months unless you're an SO. A good investment in your future despite the cadet bashing.

We'd all do it despite our great times in GA. every airline pilot wishes they were higher up the list. This is basically an investment in that. To get higher up the list an an earlier age.

das Uber Soldat
16th Nov 2016, 22:12
Not all of us mate.

logansi
16th Nov 2016, 22:14
While the REX cadetship has it's problems, it does include Accommodation and Food, for a young person who does not living in Melbourne thats more up front cost above the 45k with Jetstar cadetship and I doubt you could work at the same time.

Brakerider
17th Nov 2016, 00:01
The best thing about the REX Cadetship is that you get some "real" flying experience. Circling approaches at night into a black hole aerodrome after plugging through the storms at FL120. Not trying to compare it with GA, but certainly no comparison to sitting at FL360 enjoying a coffee on the way to Melbourne.

downdata
17th Nov 2016, 00:41
Demand and supply. If they think they can get away with charging 1 million bucks then they would.

Lookleft
17th Nov 2016, 02:41
The latest bunch of cadets doing their line training had to wait two years from completing ab-initio to type rating. Some just went back to their old jobs and waited. They were still required to pay back the training even though they weren't flying. Typical Jetstar in that they are now training the last of the cadets and there is no one else coming through the training pipeline. It will take at least two years to have any new cadets doing their line training and in that time Jetstar will probably have trained up enough DEFO's. Interesting that the REX cadetship is being touted as "real" flying experience.

Brakerider
17th Nov 2016, 03:47
Interesting that the REX cadetship is being touted as "real" flying experience.

I at no point intended to compare the Cadetship to anything more or less "real" than GA experience. I merely wanted to draw the comparison between Regional Turboprop flying to an A320.

logansi
17th Nov 2016, 04:16
I at no point intended to compare the Cadetship to anything more or less "real" than GA experience. I merely wanted to draw the comparison between Regional Turboprop flying to an A320.
I agree, re REX cadetship, at least you get experience operating into uncontrolled airports, less automation etc. It's a middle ground, with GA obviously being the most 'real' flying experience, and Jetstar being the least.

I will admit, with sums of money like this being thrown in training I can understand why people would want to avoid GA is the can.

27/09
17th Nov 2016, 06:13
Pay to Fly program NOT a cadetship...Sad really.
A Cadetship is the following...

An employment arrangement in which an employer undertakes to subsidise an employees formal training leading to certain qualifications, and in which the employee is usually required to remain with the employer for a specified period after completion of training.

$145K with a VET FEE of $15k...You'll have to borrow $130K, Good luck with that...

The last proper cadetships were with QF mainline back in the 90's. What is happening in our industry..Geez...

Where's a Plus One button.

These schemes are not far removed from the euphemistically labelled "Indian Indentureships" that operated in British Guiana.

MACH082
17th Nov 2016, 12:05
Real flying? You've obviously never danced with a jet when you've got a big tailwind, you're held high and cut in by ATC + there's weather. She can get away from you very quickly.

There's far more flexability with a prop.

Different jobs, but for the most of us, they want you to learn your craft on a prop before they give you the keys to the jet.

Just saying :)

dr dre
17th Nov 2016, 13:56
As much as some say the value of GA flying is the "real" flying necessary before getting into a jet, the reality is most of the world outside Australia doesn't have GA, trains people straight to the right hand seat of a jet after initial training, and does so successfully. Is anyone going to say an Aussie A320 pilot flies their aircraft better than say a BA A320 pilot because the Aussie pilot had spent time in Australian GA whereas the BA guy was trained straight to the jet? I assume the management and training pilots at JQ wouldn't sign off on the cadetship unless they are confident about the program's standards.

morno
17th Nov 2016, 17:04
I don't think it's in the manipulation of the jet (few simple rules and methods will keep you out of trouble for a while until you learn from the Capitan), rather everything else that makes the job a lot easier if you have prior experience in other types of flying.

I came from GA and several years of flying turboprops in the left seat to a jet. If I was having to learn things like how to fly IFR at the same time as learning how to fly a jet, I would have found it much more difficult and picking it up would have taken some time.

Cadetships are the future, can't deny it. But Jetstar's isn't a Cadetship. It's a pay for a job program.

morno

wannabe92
17th Nov 2016, 20:02
Hi guys

Is anyone privy to where the last bunch of cadets were based once they started with Jetstar? Is there a possibility of going to Jetstar Asia, Jetstar Pacific etc.

Cheers

pacman3
18th Nov 2016, 08:16
All I'll say is "Employment with Jetstar is not guaranteed at any stage during, or post completion of the Program." enough said ....

j3pipercub
18th Nov 2016, 21:38
C'mon Flyboat, you know you want to...

Trevor the lover
18th Nov 2016, 21:57
And Compylot too, surely "you've got a mate who............"

Trevor the lover
18th Nov 2016, 22:09
And as for the prior experience before "operating" a jet...............whether it all makes you a better pilot or not, I just am so thankful for all the fantastically fun flying and all the warries that I can think back on, laugh about, and reminisce with my old flying buddies about.
The day the "Local" threw up on me out of Groote, the way too low level stuff through the Torres Strait, the day we got stuck in a bowl in PNG with a failing engine, the drunken nights around the fire in the dessert with the other charter guys, low level orbits around the horizontal waterfall, free accom at Seven Spirit Bay after doing the management a favour, making radio calls like "taxying at Bing Bong for Goomeringbang via Bring Brang" (Yes, all REAL places), playing in the once a year Wave Hill Kalkaringi cricket game and facing fast bowling after 7 green cans, flying into Dum in Mirrie Island then ripping around on the quad bikes, watching an aboriginal funeral service on Elcho (quite an experience), getting to know aviation characters like Bluey the Groote refueller (RIP), etc etc etc.


To me, this is the value of a pre airline career. All those magnificent times that give priceless memories and still bring a smile to my face, while at the same time feeling a twinge of sadness that those days are gone. It sure as hell beats the hell of looking at my little mate next to me who doesn't even shave yet and hearing his "ripper" story of his last VOR in the sim. Aaaah for the good old days. There's a book in me me somewhere of all those great warries.

Airbus A320321
18th Nov 2016, 22:28
Having sat in the Jumpseat for direct entry First Officers and Cadet First Officers, I can tell you that once in the right hand seat of the jet, both types of pilots under training make similar mistakes (descent management, flare...) and are proficient in similar areas (SOPs, aircraft systems...) The notion that spending 5000 hrs flying GA/regional before jumping in an Airbus will be a massive advantage is completely false as the operating environments are vastly different. The 100+ pilots on the seniority list who started at Jetstar as cadets and are now in a fanatic career position. Why would you not join an airline in your early 20's and earn up to $200,000 a year?

GA Driver
18th Nov 2016, 23:16
Is anyone privy to where the last bunch of cadets were based once they started with Jetstar? Is there a possibility of going to Jetstar Asia, Jetstar Pacific etc.

The majority was MEL but there is a requirement of MEL, SYD, BNE or AKL for the first 12 months (I think it's 12 months.) After that it's open slather. They'll basically put you wherever they need you.

Airbus A320321
18th Nov 2016, 23:45
^^Adelaide is now also a cadet base

Lookleft
19th Nov 2016, 00:29
The notion that spending 5000 hrs flying GA/regional before jumping in an Airbus will be a massive advantage is completely false as the operating environments are vastly different.

Thats probably a valid observation from the jumpseat but from the LHS there is quite a significant difference. Yes cadets have good knowledge of SOPs and systems and yes the same mistakes will be made during training but the massive advantage is in the area of SA and the ability to keep ahead of the game. The operating environment when going into a CTAF is the same or worse for a jet and that's the environment your DEFO from GA/Regionals is streets ahead of the cadets. Why Jetstar are opening this up again when Flight Ops were stating that it was finishing is open to all sorts of speculation. The concept of P2F was probably a winner for HR.

Why would you not join an airline in your early 20's and earn up to $200,000 a year?

Have another read of Trevor's post.

Airbus A320321
19th Nov 2016, 00:59
Regarding Trevor's post, granted it sounds like he had some fantastic life experiences in GA. I'm just trying to balance out the argument. There's a lot of cadet bashing on PPRUNE that may put off potentional candidates. This is a fantastic opportunity and the vast advantages of the program ought to be stated.

27/09
19th Nov 2016, 02:57
It sure as hell beats the hell of looking at my little mate next to me who doesn't even shave yet and hearing his "ripper" story of his last VOR in the sim

Kind of sums it up really.

How such schemes can even be accepted as a cadet scheme beats me, because they're not.

mikewil
19th Nov 2016, 03:40
How such schemes can even be accepted as a cadet scheme beats me, because they're not. These 'cadetships' are kind of like what the law firm in the below article tried to get away with. Charging graduates $20K for a foot in the door to become a registered lawyer.

It was promptly stamped out by the law society of SA a few months later. How airlines get away with it and charge $150K is beyond me...

Law firm Adlawgroup asking junior lawyers to pay $22,000 for job; Fair Work Ombudsman investigating - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) (http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-06-23/junior-lawyers-asked-to-pay-22,000-for-a-job/6568174)

das Uber Soldat
19th Nov 2016, 06:55
The notion that spending 5000 hrs flying GA/regional before jumping in an Airbus will be a massive advantage is completely false as the operating environments are vastly different.
Eh? The Cadets require more than double the training hours of a DEFO. You don't call that an advantage?

AviatoR21
19th Nov 2016, 08:51
Love how these threads attract new posters, sounds like someone is a cadet. It's got nothing to do with ability to fly, it's attitude. Most cadets are good guys trying their best, but some think they are gods gift. I guess that's why EK loves these sorts of future employees.

dr dre
20th Nov 2016, 05:55
it's attitude. Most cadets are good guys trying their best, but some think they are gods gift.
You can easily apply that to non-cadet pilots as well...

Tankengine
20th Nov 2016, 06:22
You can easily apply that to non-cadet pilots as well...

Quite true, however there is a higher chance that it has been beaten/scared out of them by the time they are in the airline. ;)

one8two
6th Dec 2016, 04:57
^^^

Still waiting here...

Ollie Onion
6th Dec 2016, 20:49
It is interesting the criticism of this scheme, but I can tell you that it is a great start to a flying career if you are able to finance it. I know loads of ex-cadets who have gone on to bigger and better things.

Most are in their early 20's once their commitment to Jetstar is completed, I know a few who are now A320 FO's at Air New Zealand and a couple who are A380 FO's at Emirates. Of the ones who stayed in Jetstar, 2 of them have been allocated A320 Commands at Jetstar (NZ), one is the A320 Technical pilot and two are now Type Rating Instructors on the 787.

So, it may not be everyone's cup of tea, but for those that commit it is the fastest way for a young guy or girl to get their career on the fast track.

Liam_fl
6th Dec 2016, 23:28
Still waiting too.. I gave them a call yesterday and the person I spoke to seemed to believe they hadn't sent out all invitations yet

Sharmanat0r
8th Dec 2016, 08:54
Yeh, havnt heard anything positive or negative yet, will give a call tomorrow!

717tech
8th Dec 2016, 08:59
How long has the "Cadetship" been running? I've got no inside knowledge, but I'm having a hard time getting my head around the idea that some are already "787 Type Rating Instructors".

maggot
8th Dec 2016, 10:06
Maybe TFOs

Ollie Onion
8th Dec 2016, 20:57
They are Training First Officers and were the first pilots to be certified by CASA for the provision of 787 type rating courses in Jetstar. They have been providing the training for quite a few Qantas pilots who are being trained at Jetstar.

27/09
8th Dec 2016, 21:03
Maybe TFOs

Oh, I see, just like in GA where the new CPL becomes the instructor. It works wonderfully well in GA, so I guess it works in the airline environment too.

maggot
8th Dec 2016, 21:30
Oh, I see, just like in GA where the new CPL becomes the instructor. It works wonderfully well in GA, so I guess it works in the airline environment too.
Yep it does ok
They mostly are teaching a scripted sim endo course and are to have in depth type knowledge to help trainees then get checked by those further up the tree. My airline is pretty selective on which sims are done by TFOs/sim instructors or check captains. Not a bad way to have efficient use of resources and expose future training captains to the system.

das Uber Soldat
8th Dec 2016, 21:55
Oh, I see, just like in GA where the new CPL becomes the instructor. It works wonderfully well in GA, so I guess it works in the airline environment too.
It works perfectly fine in the instructing world and to denigrate it in favour of 'experienced pilots' is pure ignorance.

27/09
8th Dec 2016, 22:41
das Uber Soldat: It works perfectly fine in the instructing world and to denigrate it in favour of 'experienced pilots' is pure ignorance.

Yes, It works, but to say it works perfectly?

I'm not trying to denigrate anyone. We all had to start somewhere but to suggest experienced pilots are generally not better equipped to instruct than less experienced pilots, that is pure ********e.

das Uber Soldat
9th Dec 2016, 21:55
No mate, its not. I've covered this topic before. In the interests of not clogging up this thread, you can read my reasoning's here;

http://www.pprune.org/9565804-post9.html

nightaye
20th Feb 2017, 08:38
Hi, first type posting here. I have been looking into this cadetship program and was wondering are there anymore details about what is comprised within the Physics and Aviation Knowledge Test? Thanks

Stretch06
4th Mar 2017, 04:20
The Jetstar Cadet Pilot Program applications have reopened for a mid year intake. See the CAE stand at Avalon Airshow, or CAE Oxford Avaition Academy website for more details.

Jetstarpilot
4th Mar 2017, 04:37
Good lucks to all you knew jocks coming to the J*...

Can't wait to git mentooring youse all in how to "handle the big jets" and teach youse all a thing or 3:cool:

TequilaMockingbird
15th Mar 2017, 12:15
The Jetstar Cadet Pilot Program applications have reopened for a mid year intake. See the CAE stand at Avalon Airshow, or CAE Oxford Avaition Academy website for more details.
I'll bite.

I'm a bit perplexed to see that the Phase 1 testing fee has increased from $150 to $200 since testing conducted in December. Why the noticeable increase in such a short time? I know that many people had to travel from interstate and ended up paying hundreds in flights and accomodation just to attend to testing. How many quality applicants will be deterred simply by the sheer cost ($140k for training + accomodation + living expenses) associated with this cadetship?

I went through the testing for a cadetship with a different airline a number of years ago and got through to the final round. The airline paid for flights and accommodation to a major city so candidates could be further tested.

Whilst I understand this may not be viable for all airlines, I think it important for organisations to pick quality trainees that have the right aptitude as compared to those with the deepest pockets.

Although I understand that money talks and there is no shortage of wannabe pilots, I think that ultimately airlines are only hurting themselves by precluding potential quality applicants who simply don't have the finances.

Derfred
15th Mar 2017, 12:50
I'll bite.

I'm a bit perplexed to see that the Phase 1 testing fee has increased from $150 to $200 since testing conducted in December. Why the noticeable increase in such a short time? I know that many people had to travel from interstate and ended up paying hundreds in flights and accomodation just to attend to testing. How many quality applicants will be deterred simply by the sheer cost ($140k for training + accomodation + living expenses) associated with this cadetship?

I went through the testing for a cadetship with a different airline a number of years ago and got through to the final round. The airline paid for flights and accommodation to a major city so candidates could be further tested.

Whilst I understand this may not be viable for all airlines, I think it important for organisations to pick quality trainees that have the right aptitude as compared to those with the deepest pockets.

Although I understand that money talks and there is no shortage of wannabe pilots, I think that ultimately airlines are only hurting themselves by precluding potential quality applicants who simply don't have the finances.

It is the "Jetstar way". If the above offends you, then Jetstar isn't the career for you...

TequilaMockingbird
16th Mar 2017, 16:39
It is the "Jetstar way". If the above offends you, then Jetstar isn't the career for you...

Nil offence taken.

Maybe Jetstar isn't right for me, and that's something I'm perfectly okay with. But this isn't about me - it also appears that the cadetship isn't for those who don't have considerable wealth backing them despite their abilities and affinity.

Aptitude is paramount for some career choices (emergency services, ATC, defence). I would say having the right deamour and mindset is an important trait in pilots too. The lack thereof has proven to have devastating results. The consequences can be wide reaching, having an impact on not only those involved directly, but in some circumstances the whole aviation industry comes under microscope. Aircraft disasters and incidents can result in substantial financial ramifications to the airline and the industries they feed into (tourism, etc), so it makes sense to source those most suited to the job.

Imagine if a train driver, police officer, air traffic controller, etc was chosen in the same manner. Countless people entrust their lives to these high skilled professionals, and these individuals themselves have to trust that their colleagues are proficient at their jobs (much the same that a Captain should want a decent First Officer and vice versa). As such, pilots as a collective should be concerned about the potential dilution of the standards in their industry.

CurtainTwitcher
16th Mar 2017, 20:33
"'The Jade Master' is a story in a book by Ed Seykota called 'The Trader's
Window.' It's about a young man who didn't know what to do with his life."

"He had heard about a man known as the jade master who lived about five miles
away. One day the young man said to himself, 'Even though it's winter, I'm
going to visit the jade master and learn all about jade.'"

"So he walks five miles through the snow and bitter cold. Finally he comes to
the jade master's house and knocks on the door. An old man with a broom in his
hand opens it. 'Yes? What can I do for you?'"

"The young man says, 'I've come to learn about jade. Would you take me as your
student?'"

"'Sure,' the old man says. 'Come on in.'"

"Inside the house the jade master makes the young man a cup of green tea, then
presses a green stone into his hand. 'Hold that while we talk,' he says. And
as they sip their tea on this cold winter day, the old man begins telling a
story about a green tree frog."

"The young man becomes very impatient. He doesn't want to hear about tree
frogs. 'Excuse me,' he says, 'I came here to learn about jade.'"

"'Oh, excuse me,' the old man says, 'Why don't you come back next week?'"

"Puzzled, the young man heads for home. The following week he trudges all the
way back through five miles of cold snow. The old man opens the door and lets
him in. He makes the hot tea, presses this green stone into the student's hand,
and again begins to talk about a green tree frog."

"This time the young man is able to listen a little bit longer. Finally he
says, 'Excuse me, but I came here to learn about jade.' He thinks the old man
is going senile on him."

"'Oh, excuse me,' the jade masters says, 'Maybe you'd better just go home now
and come back next week.'"

"This went on all winter long, and each time the young man returned, he would
interrupt the jade master less and less. In the meantime, he learned a few
things. He now knew how to make green tea and how to sweep the kitchen floor
with the broom. As he and the old man became friends, he began to make himself
useful and help with the things that needed to be done."

"As always, the old man would sit down and start talking about the green tree
frog. The young man just listened now, never interrupting until the old man
got tired. Then he would trudge home through five miles of snow and come back
the following week."

"One day he arrived for his weekly visit. It was spring now, much easier to
make the five-mile walk. The jade master opened the door and told him to come
in. As the student sat down, the old man pressed the green stone into his hand
and gave him a cup of green tea. Again he began to tell the story of the green
tree frog."

"Wait a minute,' the young man said. 'This isn't jade.' Suddenly he knew that
the green stone in his hand wasn't jade."

source: google is your friend

Tankengine
17th Mar 2017, 01:36
Nil offence taken.

Maybe Jetstar isn't right for me, and that's something I'm perfectly okay with. But this isn't about me - it also appears that the cadetship isn't for those who don't have considerable wealth backing them despite their abilities and affinity.

Aptitude is paramount for some career choices (emergency services, ATC, defence). I would say having the right deamour and mindset is an important trait in pilots too. The lack thereof has proven to have devastating results. The consequences can be wide reaching, having an impact on not only those involved directly, but in some circumstances the whole aviation industry comes under microscope. Aircraft disasters and incidents can result in substantial financial ramifications to the airline and the industries they feed into (tourism, etc), so it makes sense to source those most suited to the job.

Imagine if a train driver, police officer, air traffic controller, etc was chosen in the same manner. Countless people entrust their lives to these high skilled professionals, and these individuals themselves have to trust that their colleagues are proficient at their jobs (much the same that a Captain should want a decent First Officer and vice versa). As such, pilots as a collective should be concerned about the potential dilution of the standards in their industry.

No shit Sherlock!
Try going back and looking at every Jetstar thread since inception. ;)

Stretch06
17th Mar 2017, 02:40
To correct Mockingbirds comment, the cost of the assessment has has not increased. It remains at $150. It is clearly explained in the documentation, on the website and confirmed with a simple call to CAE.

Popgun
17th Mar 2017, 03:24
Maybe Jetstar isn't right for me, and that's something I'm perfectly okay with. But this isn't about me - it also appears that the cadetship isn't for those who don't have considerable wealth backing them despite their abilities and affinity.

Aptitude is paramount for some career choices (emergency services, ATC, defence). I would say having the right deamour and mindset is an important trait in pilots too. The lack thereof has proven to have devastating results. The consequences can be wide reaching, having an impact on not only those involved directly, but in some circumstances the whole aviation industry comes under microscope. Aircraft disasters and incidents can result in substantial financial ramifications to the airline and the industries they feed into (tourism, etc), so it makes sense to source those most suited to the job.

Imagine if a train driver, police officer, air traffic controller, etc was chosen in the same manner. Countless people entrust their lives to these high skilled professionals, and these individuals themselves have to trust that their colleagues are proficient at their jobs (much the same that a Captain should want a decent First Officer and vice versa). As such, pilots as a collective should be concerned about the potential dilution of the standards in their industry.

You've heard the catch cry. "Safety is our Number 1 Priority!" What an awesome slogan. Would look great on a bumper sticker or a promotional t-shirt.

Yeah. Safety Schmafety. Welcome to the organisational behaviour of the modern low-cost carrier. You are learning the REAL organisational values before even becoming an employee.

Of course Jetstar wants cadets that can perform their piloting duties adequately. (i.e.. without bending an aeroplane). But they certainly aren't willing to pay for anything extra (in ability, aptitude, skill, work ethic etc etc) beyond the minimum required. It doesn't fit their business model.

The OVERARCHING focus in the entire Jetstar business is cost. Cost containment, cost reduction, cost efficiencies and continual cost elimination.

Cost, cost, cost. This is the REAL number 1 priority at this type of business. Unless they crash one (perhaps even 2) aircraft with significant lives lost then the focus of safety will never override cost. Safety is a nebulous, unquantifiable pilot-touchstone to most modern airline managers since aircraft don't usually crash. They think that pilots talking about safety implications is like the boy who cried wolf.

Safety is talked and written about. A lot. But is it acted upon? No, not when it will incur the business additional cost.

This philosophy extends to their recruitment and cadet program. If they could legally institute a genuine pay-to-fly program at Jetstar they would. It would be a nice little ancillary revenue stream along with checked baggage, preferred seat selection and the $5 muffin & coffee combo.

I wish my humour was in jest only.

If you do manage success with the Jetstar Cadet intake then you will have gained some very accurate insight to your future employer before having pulled on the uniform.

PG

TequilaMockingbird
17th Mar 2017, 03:35
No shit Sherlock!
Try going back and looking at every Jetstar thread since inception. ;)
Tankengine, agreed. I have extensively researched threads on here (as well as forums on recreationalflying, Whirlpool, etc) regarding Jetstar's cadetships along with other Australian run cadetships. Starting to see it more and more, and finding myself nodding in agreement with some old timers who have contributed here and on other threads outlining their concerns.

Stretch06, I've checked the online application portal and it says $200. However, I concur if this is my mistake and apologise for misunderstandings. I do ask myself why is there a fee anyways? REX, VA, conduct testing without fees. However, I do think we all know the answer to this...

EDIT: Thank you Popgun for the insightful comment.

logansi
17th Mar 2017, 04:56
^^ Yes for some reason it states the normal application for an RTO of $200 but never makes you pay it.

Stretch06
17th Mar 2017, 21:43
^^ Yes for some reason it states the normal application for an RTO of $200 but never makes you pay it.

Thanks Logansi, now I can see where the confusion comes from. To clarify for all, CAE have confirmed that the cost is only $150

Cessna Jockey
18th Mar 2017, 00:24
I'll bite.

I'm a bit perplexed to see that the Phase 1 testing fee has increased from $150 to $200 since testing conducted in December. Why the noticeable increase in such a short time? I know that many people had to travel from interstate and ended up paying hundreds in flights and accomodation just to attend to testing. How many quality applicants will be deterred simply by the sheer cost ($140k for training + accomodation + living expenses) associated with this cadetship?

I went through the testing for a cadetship with a different airline a number of years ago and got through to the final round. The airline paid for flights and accommodation to a major city so candidates could be further tested.

Mate this isn't just Jetstar but the Qantas group as a whole. QantasLink used to charge $180 for their aptitude test just for direct entry jobs on their props, and recent candidates going for direct entry roles with QF mainline had to arrive at the interview with the Qantas pre-employment medical already completed (a $500+ exercise just for the chance to interview). And no flights to the interview were not included..

It's all just a culling exercise to see how badly you want the gig. I'm not saying it's right but for every bloke that says "no I won't pay it", there will be 20 who fork out the cash.

Obie
23rd Mar 2017, 09:02
I know a young pilot currently undergoing training for a PPL who has applied to Jetstar for a cadetship. Application went in prior to the end of Dec 2016 and to date he has had nothing back from Jetstar! Is this the norm? Hasn't even had acknowledgement of his application!

Aviatrix91
23rd Mar 2017, 11:55
I know a young pilot currently undergoing training for a PPL who has applied to Jetstar for a cadetship. Application went in prior to the end of Dec 2016 and to date he has had nothing back from Jetstar! Is this the norm? Hasn't even had acknowledgement of his application!

Hi Obie,

The nature of this industry is such that the applicant may or may not hear back and it could be many months or even well over a year before they do. This is considered normal. Luck of the draw! If the applicant is flying already be aware as there may be a limit as to how much flying they can have before they no longer meet requirements (too many hours)

Stretch06
23rd Mar 2017, 23:32
I know a young pilot currently undergoing training for a PPL who has applied to Jetstar for a cadetship. Application went in prior to the end of Dec 2016 and to date he has had nothing back from Jetstar! Is this the norm? Hasn't even had acknowledgement of his application!

Obie,

Tried to send you a message but it wouldnt let me. I dont know of the situation, but I would suggest that if he never heard even an acknowledgment of his application, that he did not actually complete the application in full. The system sends a confirmation of the application to the candidate upon completion.

I would suggest if he indeed is interested, to apply again and give it a go.

Stretch

Obie
24th Mar 2017, 03:18
Thanks Stretch, I'll pass that on.

scott454
20th Nov 2017, 08:45
Hi all,

Was hoping for some genuine advice.
Is there anyone with some experience that could tell me honestly, what are career prospects like for cadets? Say in the case of Jetstar, how long might you be bound solely to Jetstar before you could consider a position at Virgin, Qantas or an international? Is it the command experience that would hold you back?

If this is true, would you be better placed at say Rex or Virgin Cadetships as you are more likely to get command on a turbo prop sooner?

Would appreciate anyones thoughts!

KZ Kiwi
20th Nov 2017, 08:54
The best thing about the REX Cadetship is that you get some "real" flying experience. Circling approaches at night into a black hole aerodrome after plugging through the storms at FL120. Not trying to compare it with GA, but certainly no comparison to sitting at FL360 enjoying a coffee on the way to Melbourne.

Most ignorant post ever

dr dre
20th Nov 2017, 13:21
Hi all,

Was hoping for some genuine advice.
Is there anyone with some experience that could tell me honestly, what are career prospects like for cadets? Say in the case of Jetstar, how long might you be bound solely to Jetstar before you could consider a position at Virgin, Qantas or an international? Is it the command experience that would hold you back?

If this is true, would you be better placed at say Rex or Virgin Cadetships as you are more likely to get command on a turbo prop sooner?

Would appreciate anyones thoughts!

Youíll be bound for them as long as you desire. You pay for all your initial training via FEE HELP, and you also pay for an endorsement cost which is repaid via salary sacrifice. However if you wished to leave at any time by giving the minimum notice you legally can do so, youíll just be bound to pay back the endorsement costs to the company. But they canít legally force you to stay.

The command experience wouldnít hold you back as all those airlines donít require much beyond basic CPL command hours for their recruitment. Most overseas or contract jobs donít care for command time, theyíre looking more for time on type.

Hereís a post from further back on this thread thatís also enlightening:

Most are in their early 20's once their commitment to Jetstar is completed, I know a few who are now A320 FO's at Air New Zealand and a couple who are A380 FO's at Emirates. Of the ones who stayed in Jetstar, 2 of them have been allocated A320 Commands at Jetstar (NZ), one is the A320 Technical pilot and two are now Type Rating Instructors on the 787.

Airbus A320321
20th Nov 2017, 19:41
Type rating now being paid for by the company.

Who stole my meds
21st Nov 2017, 02:19
And if that applies to Direct Entry pilots we're back to where we started re: who bears the cost of a type rating.
Now just gotta get the wages up a bit.

GA Driver
21st Nov 2017, 02:34
And if that applies to Direct Entry pilots
It applies to all direct entry recruits.

Who stole my meds
21st Nov 2017, 03:01
Awesome.......

scott454
21st Nov 2017, 04:58
Thank for the info Dr Dre and web links you sent - that's really kind of you to help!

From reading though, it seems like having zero command time on a Jet limits you to second officer or turbo prop though with any other airline. Most FO direct entry positions seem to require min 300hrs command (e.g. Virgin) unless I'm mistaken.

rep
21st Nov 2017, 05:27
You even needed command time to apply for Qantas SO.

The Jetstar cadetship will limit you to Jetstar until you obtain command, unless you are magically transferred within the group.

brucelee
14th Dec 2017, 00:05
Anyone heard if they are successful/unsuccessful from the final cadet interview?

Westieboy
14th Dec 2017, 05:35
Also waiting from the final interviews.. assuming that both successful and unsuccessful candidates will be notified?

GA Driver
14th Dec 2017, 07:21
I know of a few internal applicants who have had the unsuccessful letter.

Westieboy
14th Dec 2017, 10:07
I know of a few internal applicants who have had the unsuccessful letter.

Internal applicants from jetstar??

GA Driver
15th Dec 2017, 01:37
Yep, from other departments

Stretch06
15th Dec 2017, 08:11
All should hear by the end of next week, successful and unsuccessful.

And remember if you don't get in, there are many ways to achieve the end result.

ftrpltern
26th Sep 2018, 14:42
Hi all,

This is my first time applying for a cadetship, so I am hoping someone sees this and answers because every time I've seen these questions asked they are ignored or not covered very well.
What does the computer-based testing include other than physics and math?
Do you have any tips?
What kind of math and physics questions are asked?
Is it basic addition and multiplication or more complex math?
Does the physics require any formula knowledge (e.g. f=ma, s=vt, etc) or is it just basic physics (e.g. "what force allows a plane to fly")?
What kind of group activities are conducted at the next stage?

Thank you to anyone who answers and good luck to anyone else who has also applied!

mattyj
26th Sep 2018, 20:10
Iíve got no idea about the particular testing you will be doing so feel free to ignore but if itís anything like all the current trends in airline HR it will be weighted heavily in favour of psychometric, reasoning and horrid spacial type questions where you have to identify patterns..nothing in your education will prepare you that well except perhaps this:https://cimg3.ibsrv.net/gimg/pprune.org-vbulletin/384x384/52444f71_24f1_4dc3_9c96_7889c296f72a_841e62f5e4f9e30a75c80e0 6062d3b54aceec097.jpeg

Steve Zissou
27th Sep 2018, 09:02
Except in the actual tests the cube above would have no holes in it :ugh:

RHSandLovingIt
28th Sep 2018, 04:00
Except in the actual tests the cube above would have no holes in it :ugh:
Cube??!? Looks a bit too spherical to be a cube ;)

In all seriousness, aside from maths and physics, it'll probably be a bunch of those "what is the next pattern in the sequence?" tests that get progressively more complex. Would expect some logic and reasoning type stuff of the "read the brief paragraph, answer a question of the 'true/false/cannot say' variety... And no doubt one of those Myers-Briggs-type "I would rather stay in and read a book than go to a party - agree/disagree" personality questionnaire

Indeed, the Jetstar cadet programme website from the training provider CAE (https://www.cae.com/civil-aviation/aviation-professionals/become-a-pilot/our-pilot-training-programmes/jetstar-cadet-pilot-program/) indicates that they use the "ADAPT online assessment"...


Maths
Physics
Aviation Knowledge
Cognitive skills
Coordination and Control
Technical aptitude
ADAPT Personality Questionnaire



A quick Google of "ADAPT online assessment" should give you a fair idea of what to expect.

mattyj
28th Sep 2018, 11:09
Cube??!? Looks a bit too spherical to be a cube https://www.pprune.org/images/smilies/wink2.gif

Steve Zissou has recently proven, once and for all, that you can fit a square peg in a round hole if you try hard enough..

Steve Zissou
28th Sep 2018, 19:25
Pot/kettle/black? :oh: