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dboy
3rd Nov 2016, 13:11
Hello

On the short term i have to move to the UK for a new flying position.

I have noticed that renting appartments in UK can be pretty expensive. So i was thinking to rent a room. SpareRoom for flatshare, house share, flat share & rooms for rent (http://www.spareroom.co.uk)
Question is: can i have my official domicile on a room or is this not allowed in the UK?

Tx in advance.

Peter-RB
4th Nov 2016, 15:45
Good question, If you were just renting a room, any mail would come to your name at said address of building where room was situated, or C/O (care of) Room 2 at Mrs Miggins Pie shop,... just how legal that would be for say Licence's or other such serious bits of paper, really I cannot say for sure!, you may need to clarify this with a Solicitor/Law centre..or whoever would be giving you said position ..!

Kelly Hopper
4th Nov 2016, 17:49
Not that this will help you but moving between states in OZ means changing driving licences. I was staying in a Sydney hotel and used room 204, blabla hotel, North Shore and they accepted that no problem! It's still on my licence.

racedo
4th Nov 2016, 20:55
Renting a room is a perfect way to prove domicile.
Ensure you have some bills / bank statement coming in as proof of residence.

What you need to ensure though is that when you leave you ensure all of these addresses are changed before you leave as someone grabbing your ID in shared house is common.

In relation to any banks or credit card companys I would ensure that you pick from a Bank branch rather than direct to house.

Gertrude the Wombat
4th Nov 2016, 23:02
official domicile
What is an "official domicile"? - I've lived in the UK all my life and never had one, never even heard of one. Is it something that immigrants from dodgy countries have to demonstrate they've got?

Nervous SLF
5th Nov 2016, 01:00
What is an "official domicile"? - I've lived in the UK all my life and never had one, never even heard of one. Is it something that immigrants from dodgy countries have to demonstrate they've got?


Yes especially if coming from Australia. I understand that there is a note explaining this included with their Aus passports, of course I could be incorrect.











:):):)

ExSp33db1rd
5th Nov 2016, 06:33
Not that this will help you but moving between states in OZ means changing driving licences. I was staying in a Sydney hotel and used room 204, blabla hotel, North Shore and they accepted that no problem! It's still on my licence.


First went to Singapore equipped myself with a m/bike almost before unpacking, applied for local licence with no fixed abode, gave the airline H.Q. address, no problem. Don't recall ever bothering to change it ? On another thread have recalled how I missed a turn off a busy freeway, so backed up. Resultant Cop asked me if I flew my aeroplane backwards ? So why drive car backwards, p*ss off ( or words to that effect )

dboy
5th Nov 2016, 08:14
@wombat

You are the second uk man not knowing this. Perhaps it just doenst exist in the UK??

In my country there is actual a difference between place of residence and official domicile.

A residence is a place where you stay. It can be a place where you get mail and invoices.
But an official domicile is used for tax reasons plus all the official letters coming from authorities will only be sent to this address.

So i wanted to know if a rent a room in a house if i am allowed to have my domicile down there.

UniFoxOs
5th Nov 2016, 08:44
What is an "official domicile"?

Depends what official wants to know, surely. Banks, guvmint depts, employers, CAA will all have their own requirements.

Perhaps it just doenst exist in the UK??

Lived in UK all my 70 years, never been asked for it, I guess it is a term common in other countries.

wiggy
5th Nov 2016, 08:56
I guess it is a term common in other countries.

Not sure about the term but I can understand the OPs possible confusion/problem.

In many countries you need to provide documentary evidence of residence when applying/registering for the likes of healthcare and heaven knows what else. That requirements is usually satisfied by providing the authorities with the likes of with a utility bill in your name.

Gertrude the Wombat
5th Nov 2016, 10:37
So i wanted to know if a rent a room in a house if i am allowed to have my domicile down there.The question was about the UK? - there is no such concept, you can live where you like. (With maybe still a few exceptions for corner cases - eg there used to be special rules for Russian diplomats during the cold war.)

From time to time various government and commercial agencies might want some evidence of where you live, other than you just telling them. If you're renting a room then showing them the rental agreement is likely to work; this is easier if you're on the electoral register, but you can only get onto the electoral register if you're entitled to vote (different rules for UK citizens, EU citizens, Commonwealth citizens and probably some others).

VP959
5th Nov 2016, 10:48
As above, there never has been a concept of "official domicile" in the UK, for UK residents. The first time I came across it was when asked for it when applying for a Bahraini driving licence. I just gave them the address of the flat in Manama where I was staying, showed them my UK licence, and they seemed happy enough.

oldchina
5th Nov 2016, 15:28
I decided to chip in because there's some confusing "advice" here.
Best avoid using the term Domicile because apart from tax affairs (where it means countries not addresses) it's a term never used in the UK,
unless one is trying to be terribly posh. In everyday life all that matters is where you are resident, i.e. where you live. That's the address you
would give to your friends. Any type of correspondence can be sent there. There is no notion of a Domicile being different from your everyday
address nor of different addresses for different types of communication.

P.S. at least as a UK citizen where you live is not the government's business, as long as their agents (e.g. passport office) can contact you.
This is underlined by the fact that there is no uk ID card. Long may it remain so!

dboy
5th Nov 2016, 16:29
Tx guys, you really helped a lot. Now it is clear. Wish it was also that easy in my home country.

(Y)

oldchina
5th Nov 2016, 16:47
dboy:

Don't answer if it's too nosey, but where is this place you refer to?

Gertrude the Wombat
5th Nov 2016, 17:24
This is underlined by the fact that there is no uk ID card. Long may it remain so!
Or, in other words, we're not (yet) a police state. But this takes work to maintain - the Labour government were in the process of introducing an ID card when they got kicked out and the incoming Coalition scrapped the project.

"Long may it remain so" to be sure, but this will only happen if people make it happen - politics is not a spectator sport.

G-CPTN
5th Nov 2016, 17:35
This is underlined by the fact that there is no uk ID card. Long may it remain so!
Wouldn't ID cards enable 'illegals' to be identified?
I survived living in Denmark with a 'personbevis'.
It served to ensure that you could cash a cheque for cash wherever you wanted (in the days before credit cards were accepted).

Gertrude the Wombat
5th Nov 2016, 18:06
Wouldn't ID cards enable 'illegals' to be identified?
What do you mean by "illegals"? Do you mean "people, who are doing something illegal"?

The answer is "probably not", which you can easily spot by looking at countries that do have ID cards and seeing whether or not they've got any people doing illegal things.

And even if it worked it wouldn't be worth living in a police state for.

Nervous SLF
5th Nov 2016, 20:58
Some people can and do forge documents for money so an ID card wouldn't be as ideal as some hope. Like certain other "Laws"
only the Law abiding folk would obey anyway the others wouldn't give a stuff and ignore them.

ian16th
5th Nov 2016, 21:20
As oldchina said, the UK tax man has or had a term, 'not normally domiciled' that meant you did not pay UK Income Tax.
I dunno why they do not use the term 'resident'.

The fact that the Royal Mail deliver to almost everyone's front door, is something that many foreigners find unusual.

Here in darkest Africa most of us use a P O Box and collect our mail at the Post Office. So we have a 'Postal Address', the PO Box and a 'Residential' or 'Street Address'.

In the UK having a PO Box is something used by people with something to hide and treated with suspicion.

ExSp33db1rd
6th Nov 2016, 05:38
........... by looking at countries that do have ID cards and seeing whether or not they've got any people doing illegal things.

Like the USA for instance ? Thinks .. although everyone in the USA seems to have an ID, even a "driving licence" for those who can't, and don't want, to drive which rather defeats the object, but is ownership of an ID obligatory ?

I once patronised an establishment in California advertising - quote " ID cards provided" in the days when my driving licence didn't have a photo and I couldn't be bothered carting my passport around and I wanted a beer. I gave the clerk a photo that he sort of admitted looked like me and provided me with a laminated ID card declaring an age in excess of 21 - which actually was true. Was once asked for my ID at a bar, and I replied that I didn't have one because I knew who I was - no beer. At age 81 last year I was unable to buy a beer from a supermarket because I couldn't prove I was over 21. I felt pleased and angry at the same time ! I'd popped out in beach shorts and forgotten to pick up my foreign, photo licence.

Also off thread, but I recently needed a signature witnessing on a financial document that I had to then mail. I attended a shop advertising Notary Public services, and an ethnic Indian USA citizen refused to act for me because I couldn't show him proof that I was legally in the USA, no matter that I could show him my driving licence that proved that I was the person about to make the signature that he only had to verify was the person named on the document as creating that signature before his very eyes - me. I had to return and show my passport with valid Immigration stamp. Maybe had I blacked my face, or worn a sombrero, he would have obliged, after all I had to pay him and arm and a leg as well.

Funny old World.

UniFoxOs
6th Nov 2016, 09:04
I had to return and show my passport with valid Immigration stamp.

Was he the only shop in town? I'd have gone somewhere else.

ORAC
6th Nov 2016, 09:11
UK Government advice on domicile.


https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/267933/domicile.pdf

VP959
6th Nov 2016, 09:25
At age 81 last year I was unable to buy a beer from a supermarket because I couldn't prove I was over 21. I felt pleased and angry at the same time ! I'd popped out in beach shorts and forgotten to pick up my foreign, photo licence.

Contrast that with my weekly supermarket experience here. I always use the self-service checkouts for speed, and they won't let you pay if you've bought alcohol (and there are always a few bottles of wine in my shopping) until someone has checked you're over 18.

I'm 63, and have been shopping at the same supermarket for around 15 years now. Not once have I ever been asked for ID, the girls who enter the code into the machine saying I'm over 18 usually make a joke along the lines of "well, I can see you're over 18" or similar.

oldchina
6th Nov 2016, 10:02
ORAC

"UK Government advice on domicile"

This just confirms that in a UK govt context the word domicile refers to a nation state or territory and not someone's address.

axefurabz
6th Nov 2016, 11:40
As oldchina said, the UK tax man has or had a term, 'not normally domiciled' that meant you did not pay UK Income Tax.
I dunno why they do not use the term 'resident'.

'Cos in UK tax terms, they are two different things.

ORAC
6th Nov 2016, 12:45
Good overall explanation of resident, normally resident and domicile here....

http://www.carsontrotter.co.uk/cms/filelibrary/Residence_and_domicile_and_the_taxation_of_overseas_income.p df

Domicile is a general concept with application to matters such as the validity of wills and intestacy law, as well as taxation. A person’s domicile is the country that is that person’s natural home to which that person would eventually expect to return after a stay abroad. It is a much more permanent concept than residence. Most people retain the same domicile throughout their lives and do not change it even if they live for long periods abroad........

In some countries, the term ‘domicile’ is used to mean the right of residence, or even the place of residence. This is not its meaning in the UK. Domicile is usually only relevant to UK tax liability if the individual is resident or ordinarily resident in the UK. Non-domiciled status can confer tax advantages for income tax, CGT and IHT........

ehwatezedoing
6th Nov 2016, 13:30
. At age 81 last year I was unable to buy a beer from a supermarket because I couldn't prove I was over 21.

It reminds me that apparently in Alaska, any alcohool seller is supposed to check your driver's license. It shows on it its validity and if you lost it at some point from driving impaired which is a big beer nono!



(I may have this story completely wrong though...)

ExXB
6th Nov 2016, 13:44
VP959 we have a similar system here with self-service check out. To me it makes sense, if I go through a regular check out the clerk can see I'm over 16 (for beer/wine) or 18 (everything else). But a self-service check out can't do that. A human has to intervene.

A while back, when going through the regular check out, the clerk asked me to wait a second while she called her supervisor. The problem turned out that SHE wasn't yet 18 and couldn't sell me booze without an adult checking.