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timgill
29th Oct 2016, 16:55
Mrs timgill is getting a new hip in a few weeks' time, and the doctor says she'll be able to drive again within 4-6 weeks.

But as it's her left hip that's being replaced, and as she drives an automatic, might she be able to get behind the wheel sooner?

Thanks in advance to anyone who's had this operation/experience...

oopspff7
29th Oct 2016, 17:01
I waited for 8 weeks before I drove. I had the right hip done.I sat in the car and made sure I could press down hard on the brake pedal with out any problem.

Fareastdriver
29th Oct 2016, 17:46
When I had my left knee done I told my surgeon that I had an automatic car and he was quite happy for me to drive straightaway. I don't know what the DLVA rules are though.

Takeoff53
29th Oct 2016, 17:53
Got both hips replaced within 6 days and 6 weeks after the second replacement I started driving and 2 weeks later I was on the motorcycle (where the biggest problem was to get on and off)

cubemaster
29th Oct 2016, 18:03
It's not so much the 'DVLA rules' more rather being covered by insurance.
If your surgeon says "don't drive for x weeks" then you won't be legally covered for that period. Your insurer will reject any claim in that period.

Also be aware that any pre-op statement about being able to drive is only an estimate - the outcome of the op could give a different time frame.

Mrs cubemaster had a knee op lined up, surgeon said "you'll be driving in 4 weeks". After the op he said "damage was worse than expected - no weight bearing for 6 weeks and no driving for 3 months".

So wait until after her op .... I hope it goes well.

Harley Quinn
29th Oct 2016, 18:09
There is also the issue of the body clearing out the last dregs of the general anaesthetic which apparently takes some time.

Gertrude the Wombat
29th Oct 2016, 20:41
There is also the issue of the body clearing out the last dregs of the general anaesthetic which apparently takes some time.Which, depending on the chemicals involved, might involve getting one hell of a hangover if you drink anything at all within a week of the operation. In my family's experience they don't actually warn you about this, they just act all surprised that you didn't know this "general knowledge" when you complain later.


So a bottle of champers to celebrate the successful operation turned out to be a bad idea.

parabellum
29th Oct 2016, 23:59
I read somewhere that a patient should avoid making any major decisions or signing any contracts for at least six weeks after receiving a GA. If Mac the Knife still reads PPRuNe he will no doubt have the answers.

Chef Bruz
30th Oct 2016, 00:33
Geeze, I had a shoulder reconstruction and was told by the surgeon I was banned from driving for six weeks! Something to do with liability in the event of an accident...

UniFoxOs
30th Oct 2016, 10:04
Yes, the insurance is the thing. I had the right cruciate ligament fixed last year, real pain to be off the orad for 6 weeks. You must explain to the surgeon that your Missus drives an auto and get a clear agreement from him/her as to when she can drive. Written would be best, but as long as there is a third party present (nurse, maybe) she should be covered all right if he says she can drive sooner.

cavortingcheetah
30th Oct 2016, 16:58
Six weeks unless you prevail upon your consultant to sign you out earlier. Otherwise you're a dead duck if you're photographed, crashed dinged, stopped, ticketed by a warden or even looked at by a zebra crossing and you won't be able to get out of the car very quickly if it bursts into flames.

G-CPTN
30th Oct 2016, 17:09
I had a toenail removed surgically, and I was told that I should not drive as I would not be insured in the event of a collision.
I can't remember what was the period of suspension.

ExSp33db1rd
31st Oct 2016, 08:52
Just voluntarily undertaken a NZ AA Senior Driver assessment, free for Those of A Certain Age. Before starting I was told that more teenage drivers are now failing due to 1) signalling failures, 2) speeding, 3) scanning 4) and Lookout. This last requires drivers to physically turn the head and body to clear blind spots, and especially when pulling out of a road parking spot, and the comment was that many drivers Of A Certain Age cannot turn the body due to hip replacements, and although there is no suggestion that their licence should now be revoked, were they "new" drivers they would probably be denied a licence.

NZ dropped repeat tests for Those Of A Certain Age, but we do have to renew every two years with a medical certificate.

Had my "assessment" been a "test" I would have passed ! ( he said )

IBMJunkman
31st Oct 2016, 18:01
The chief of police in Los Angeles is an avid dirt bike rider. This weekend he fell while riding and fractured his pelvis. He drove himself home.

The man is 63. 1 Corinthians 13:11

Luckily, being the boss he has a driver for work.

LAPD Chief Charlie Beck Fractures Pelvis Falling Off Motorcycle On Mountain Trail | KTLA (http://ktla.com/2016/10/30/lapd-chief-charlie-beck-fractures-pelvis-falling-off-motorcycle-on-mountain-trail/)

good spark
31st Oct 2016, 18:51
my cousin, the same age as me has just been given the green light to drive after having her left hip replaced, the problem she had was lifting her leg to get into the car! if it was a left hand drive car she would have been away much sooner.


gs

Wyler
1st Nov 2016, 15:48
I've had both hips replaced. Was back driving after about 5 weeks. Everyone is different and my Surgeon just said to stay away until I was happy. It was actually the getting in and out of the car that was the biggest problem.
GA not a problem as Hips are done under sedation. Brilliant as you are out for the count but the recovery is instantaneous (the next 3 weeks is a different matter.....:\)

Clare Prop
1st Nov 2016, 16:55
The danger is in dislocating it with any sudden movements such as braking or even just getting in and out of the car, which is quite a mission at first. You have to sit on a wedge cushion, funky toilet seat, not bend over to pick things up, have your bed propped up on bricks etc for six weeks to ensure that your hip is always higher than your knees. I was driving and flying six weeks after my hip replacement, had to show the doc I could get in and out of a light aircraft. Mine was done with an epidural.

tell her NOT to watch hip replacements on youtube before the op :O