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Effluent Man
4th Oct 2016, 23:07
Just eighteen days, knocks Sam's sixty seven into a cocked hat.

Seldomfitforpurpose
4th Oct 2016, 23:51
IMHO anyone whose 'team' has Jezza in the managers post ought to refrain from this sort of thing :p:p:p

Effluent Man
5th Oct 2016, 04:43
Que?......

Krystal n chips
5th Oct 2016, 06:55
I was unaware it was common practice to add "under duress", in Latin no less, when signing a contract......this being UKIP however, anything is possible....other than winning votes, gaining seats and having tangible policies that is.

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/oct/04/ukip-leader-diane-james-resigns-after-just-18-days-in-job-reports

We look forward to learning what the duress in question was...... and how it was applied.....

Will she be getting an entry in the Guiness Book of Records at all ?

Hydromet
5th Oct 2016, 07:55
Who is Diane James? Who is Big Sam? Who is Jezza?

Krystal n chips
5th Oct 2016, 08:06
Hydromet....

Diane James was the leader of an inconsequential political party known as UKIP here in the UK

Big Sam was the former, allegedly corrupt, manager of an equally inconsequential football team......called England.

Jezza refers to the current leader of the UK Labour Party, one Jeremy Corbyn, albeit not entirely the leader of choice in the eyes and minds of many. However, his tenure has been considerably longer than the first two above.

Hydromet
5th Oct 2016, 09:02
Thanks KnC.
Jeremy Corbyn I have heard of. Guess I don't need to know about the other two.

Sallyann1234
5th Oct 2016, 09:48
None of us does...

vctenderness
5th Oct 2016, 10:00
Diane James was the leader of an inconsequential political party known as UKIP here in the UK


An "inconsequential party" that won outright the EU Elections beating other consequential parties into second and third place.

Garnered over 4,000,000 votes in the last General Election even though only gained one seat. The consequential SNP got about a quarter of that and won 56 seats.

Was led by a man, Nigel Farage, who is the reason that the UK government gave the people a referendum on EU membership which was was won with around 17.4 million votes. The consequential parties were all in favour of remaining.

So:ok:

Sallyann1234
5th Oct 2016, 11:47
Garnered over 4,000,000 votes in the last General Election even though only gained one seat. The consequential SNP got about a quarter of that and won 56 seats.Democracy at work. :ok:

The 4,000,000 votes were spread over 90% of the population, so that they were a minority in all but one of the constituencies. The 'quarter of that' were concentrated in seats containing just 10% of the population.

wiggy
5th Oct 2016, 11:53
Nigel Farage, who is the reason that the UK government gave the people a referendum on EU membership which was was won with around 17.4 million votes. The consequential parties were all in favour of remaining.

So:ok:

Err .I am sure he'd like to think that but I thought the referendum was the result of "Dave" wanting to appease the Brexit wing of the Tory party....

vulcanised
5th Oct 2016, 12:26
I think Farage will be remembered long after Cameron is forgotten.
.

Groundbased
5th Oct 2016, 13:04
Err .I am sure he'd like to think that but I thought the referendum was the result of "Dave" wanting to appease the Brexit wing of the Tory party....
I think the referendum was the result of Dave wanting to attract UKIP voters in order to get a majority. Which it did, albeit a small one. He showed little appetite for appeasing the Europhobe element of the party in the past. He needed more votes and thought they had to come from UKIP. Ironically I think a lot of them actually came from Labour.

Krystal n chips
5th Oct 2016, 13:21
Phew ! that was close...however, thankfully our already overstretched A & E Dept's, and cardiologists can now relax, free from the potential sudden influx of UKIP members distraught at recent events.

Nigel Farage 'steps back in at UKIP' as Diane James quits - BBC News (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-37561065)

Temporary, interim, transitional,.....take your pick, But, the fact remains, UKIP have, and always will be, a one person centric party.

Of course, if he really was so adamant about retiring, he could simply have declined to return.....plus, it says a lot about the structure of the party that, seemingly, there are no contingency plans, such as a deputy perhaps, or a general secretary. who could fulfil the role of leader in such circumstances as now exist.

Andy_S
5th Oct 2016, 13:42
I think the referendum was the result of Dave wanting to attract UKIP voters in order to get a majority.

I partly agree with that.

I think with a closely fought election on the horizon, Cameron feared that UKIP would attract enough votes to deprive him of a number of key marginals. The promise of a referendum was to staunch the flow of votes from Conservative to UKIP candidates.

Iím not a fan of Farage, but you have to acknowledge that in the above respect his single minded determination facilitated a political movement that forced Cameronís hand.

Fairdealfrank
5th Oct 2016, 22:23
Diane James was the leader of an inconsequential political party known as UKIP here in the UKWithout any MPs till last year, UKIP has got its main policy enacted. Possibly another one will be enacted as well (grammar schools).

Hardly an "inconsequential" party.

The only other party to achieve policy implementation without parliamentary representation was .......... the Monster Raving Loony Party. In its case it was votes at 18, abolition of the 11+, and (legal) commercial radio.

Interestingly, without "Lord" David Sutch the Monster Raving Loony Party became a shadow of its former self, it would be tragic if UKIP does the same without Nigel.

Krystal n chips
6th Oct 2016, 05:43
For those who so revere UKIP, my deepest commiserations in this respect, and who feel the party is actually of some consequence, please watch the two pieces below....

http://www.channel4.com/news/catch-up/display/playlistref/051016

Michael Crick, as always, summates matters perfectly.....K.G-M likewise asking the same questions posed on here.

Nige, bless him, does a credible impression of a Dover sole floundering along with his replies.

VP959
6th Oct 2016, 08:23
For those who so revere UKIP, my deepest commiserations in this respect, and who feel the party is actually of some consequence, please watch the two pieces below....

http://www.channel4.com/news/catch-up/display/playlistref/051016

Michael Crick, as always, summates matters perfectly.....K.G-M likewise asking the same questions posed on here.

Nige, bless him, does a credible impression of a Dover sole floundering along with his replies.

I don't "revere" him, but I do have the greatest respect for the fact that he managed to coalesce the long-held anti-EU feeling amongst a large proportion of the population of the UK, and apply enough pressure to the Tories to force them to hold a referendum in order to have a chance of avoiding a major split within their ranks.

There is no doubt that he has a knack for picking up on what a lot of ordinary people feel, whether you love him or loathe him he is fairly unique in that regard. Look at the other parties. They are either fighting amongst themselves over ideals that will never, ever, make it into government, or they are back-pedalling to try and re-capture the political ground that UKIP took. Theresa May, even, seems to be aiming for the "social fairness" part of UKIPs agenda, a tactic that I suspect will win her a lot of support. Labour on the other hand, are fighting away like a bunch of Marxist rebels, and much as Jeremy Corbyn might be a nice enough bloke, with strong principles, he has absolutely none of the qualities needed for a good prime minister.

Without Nigel Farage the referendum would never have happened, and more than half the voting public would have continued to feel disenfranchised. I don't much like the bloke, but I do admire what he's managed to achieve.

Krystal n chips
6th Oct 2016, 09:13
" Without Nigel Farage the referendum would never have happened, and more than half the voting public would have continued to feel disenfranchised. I don't much like the bloke, but I do admire what he's managed to achieve"

Very true and now we await the result of his efforts to de stabilise the UK.

It's understandable however why, given your stance overall when it comes to politics and society per se, you can admire a dictator.

VP959
6th Oct 2016, 10:24
" Without Nigel Farage the referendum would never have happened, and more than half the voting public would have continued to feel disenfranchised. I don't much like the bloke, but I do admire what he's managed to achieve"

Very true and now we await the result of his efforts to de stabilise the UK.

It's understandable however why, given your stance overall when it comes to politics and society per se, you can admire a dictator.

People far wiser and more knowledgeable than I have observed that a benign dictator can provide a better and more stable form of government than a poor democracy. I lived in a state ruled by a benign dictator for a time. There was very little crime, a great deal of social freedom and excellent social and public services. I met the man twice and both times he impressed me with the genuine care and responsibility he felt towards looking after "his people".

Admittedly, benign dictators are rare, unlike poor democracies, which are very commonplace. Democracy can be over-rated as a form of government, in my view, especially when it becomes dominated by a political elite, within all parties, and so ceases to represent the people. We are seeing that happen in several Western states right now, for example.

Those countries that have wholeheartedly adopted socialism seem to have suffered the same fate, they have become one party, or virtual one party, states, where the desires and wishes of the people are not represented at all within the ruling elite.

Good government, IMHO, requires stability of leadership more than anything else in order to succeed, but that leadership has to listen to, and act for, the needs of the people. I've yet to see many governments around the world that meet this criterion.